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review 2017-07-24 01:02
Quick Thoughts: Burning Lamp
Burning Lamp (Arcane Society, #8) - Amanda Quick

Burning Lamp
by Amanda Quick
Book 8 of Arcane Society
-- Book 2 of Dreamlight Trilogy

 

 

The Arcane Society was born in turmoil when the friendship of its two founders evolved into a fierce rivalry.  Sylvester Jones and Nicholas Winters each sought to enhance their individual psychic talents.  Winters' efforts led to the creation of a device of unknown powers called the Burning Lamp.  Each generation the Winters man who inherits it is destined to develop multiple talents - and the curse of madness.

Plagued by hallucinations and nightmares, notorious crime lord Griffin Winters is convinced he has been struck with the Winters Curse.  And the instincts that have helped him survive the streets and rise to power are now drawing him toward Adelaide Pyne, the bothersome social reformer.  But even as he arranges a meeting with the mysterious woman, he has no idea how closely their fates are bound, for Adelaide holds the Burning Lamp in her possession.

A dreamlight reader, Adelaide should be able to manipulate the Lamp's light to save both Griffin's sanity and his life.  But their dangerous psychical experiment makes them the target of forces both inside and outside of the Arcane Society.  And though desire strengthens their power their different lives will keep them apart - if death doesn't take them together.



I hate to admit this, since I DID enjoy Burning Lamp and found it a nice, easy, breezy read, witticisms and interesting characters included, but it didn't escape my notice that Burning Lamp was just a pretty repetition of Fired Up, but in an historical setting.  Dialogue and actions and some of the scenes were very similar, and while I applaud Amanda Quick's smooth connections between contemporary and historical (as well as all that foreshadowing that we already know occurs since the contemporary time line came first), it just wasn't as memorable an experience as I would have liked given that Fired Up came first.

Not the entire book is the same, of course.  I do love the interactions between all of our characters, Adelaide and Griffin, Mrs. Trevelyan and Delbert, and even with Jed and Leggert, and the inclusion of Caleb and Lucinda Jones.

Burning Lamp is a nice bridging connection between the first book in the Dreamlight trilogy, and the last, but I can't help but realize that not much occurs in this book that we don't already know about.  Very little forward progress is made, and it makes me feel that the next and last book in this sub-trilogy will really need to step it up in order to bring the story arc of the 'Winters Curse' and the 'Burning Lamp' to a close.

Frankly, given my love for the Harmony series, obviously my hopes are pretty high; although even if things don't turn out the way I want, I'll still enjoy myself.  Seeing as how Midnight Crystal will involve not only the cursed Winters man, but also a dreamlight reader who's last name is Jones, I'm feeling that a lot of things will come full circle into a nice wrap up.  After all, the Winters and the Jones are supposed to be enemies, according to legend.

All else fails, Harmony books always play up the dust bunnies to make everyone happy--I'm not above swooning over dust bunnies if the book itself doesn't entirely entice me.


***

 

Booklikes-opoly

Roll #29:
Book takes place in England (counts as an island).

Page Count:  328
Cash Award:  +$9.00

Updated Bank Balance:  $219.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: anicheungbookabyss.blogspot.com/2017/07/quick-thoughts-burning-lamp.html
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review 2017-07-23 16:44
Audio Book Review: The Society
The Society - Lilith Saintcrow

*I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.


The story rotates from Rowan and Delgado's POV, female and male. Rayna does a nice job of giving a deeper tone when Delgado's speaking or when in his mind. It helps separate the characters for us. There is a description of Rowan's voice being a bit on the husky side, and Rayna's voice fits this for me. Rowan is a delicate person in this book. She's lived through some terrible things she's seen. This creates a vulnerable person to be voiced. Rayna voices Rowan in those moments when her hearts breaking and she sounds lost, as Rowan would. Even with Delgado, he's trying to be careful with Rowan but he's also falling for her, so there's a level of concern and thought in his voice that comes through with Rayna's tones. Very powerful emotions portrayed with talent.

From the moment he sees Rowan for the first time at that abandoned house, he's found her attractive and he's protective of her. The way he comes across as he's doing his job, watching her to find if she's with the government or maybe recruit her for her psi ability, does NOT come out stalker-ish and it very well could have. On the contrary, it comes out more protective. There is a draw there for him but it's gentle in feeling.

I found I liked Delgado and Rowan. Both are good people and do the right thing. Delgado though, he is afraid he'll scare Rowan because her psi is so sensitive and that most people are nervous of him. Why? To think so low of himself has me curious as to what he can do. And we do learn about why Delgado thinks this way.

Oh my. I'm just going to say it. I absolutely LOVE Delgado. He's that damaged character that's trying so hard. I fell in love with him more and more as the story went.

When Delgado gets to explain things to Rowan, I found I really liked how he did it. He was honest with her and didn't hold things back. But he did it with a gentle feel, trying to keep her emotions in mind.

This is more of a romance read. There is a bit of action and urgency to what the characters do. BUT this is a story told from the characters minds as they meet and get to know and even fall for each other through their actions.

Lilith gently draws us into the world of psi with Rowan and Delgado. There are things happening that make us curious, but also builds the characters as people for us, and in doing this she builds the world through them. We aren't blindly thrown into a new world, we learn it with Rowan.

Okay. All that being said. I found I slipped into their relationship and the growth of it. How they became so intimately entwined emotionally. Wow. I feel that audio really elevated this feeling for me. Lilith with the words and Rayna with the voice, together they were seductive.

Before the end of this one, I knew I needed the next book. At the end, I NEED the next one. lol.

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review 2017-07-21 13:30
The Rose Society by Marie Lu
The Rose Society - Marie Lu

I knew this series would be dark based off of the first book, but wow this series went farther with that than I originally expected it to. Honestly, I'm so glad this book went there. It stands out from the numerous young adult books that feature characters with special powers.

 

The main character, Adelina, is not the typical main character you'd expect. She fully embraces darkness and feeds off of others fear. She revels in the deaths that she causes and her ambition drivers her further to being a villain. It's incredible to read about because it's such a unique story and Marie Lu artfully depicts Adeline's ambition, as well as her madness. 

 

Adelina is not the only stand out character in this book. Due to events at the end of the last book, a new set of characters becomes the main cast of the story, aside from Raffaele and Teren. Teren is very clearly crazy and dangerous and I really liked the direction his character went in. It was believable, but also chilling, especially when it's clear that his mind isn't all there. I'm honestly not sure how I feel about Raffaele though. His chapters seemed the slowest, but honestly he seems like the only one in this series with his head screwed on right.

 

The main reason that I wasn't blown away by this book was because it didn't shock or wow me in any way. I enjoyed the characters and the story, but the plot played out almost exactly as I expected it would. I was hoping that this ending would surprise me like the last one did, but I had predicted how it would end before even picking up the book.

 

The romance in the book didn't overwhelm the plot, but there is somewhat of a love triangle. There also seems to be a bit of insta love with Magiano and Adelina. Honestly, I don't know why someone full of joy would be attracted to Adelina in any way, but somehow that happened. There wasn't really a build up to the attraction and I'm kind of confused by it. I quite like Magiano, but he deserves better than Adelina, especially because she still pines for Enzo.

 

As much as I enjoy the characters and where the story has gone, I was looking for a little more from this book. The beginning was fairly slow and consisted mainly of planning and setting up for the action at the end of the book. If you can get through the slower part, then the end definitely makes up for it with plenty of action.

 

Overall, I did enjoy this book though and I will be picking up the next book. However, my need for The Midnight Star is less than the need I had to read The Rose Society. I'm not sure if it's because I feel like I know how the series will end or if it's because this book didn't end nearly as dramatically as The Young Elites.

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review 2017-06-26 06:11
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society
The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society - Mary Ann Shaffer,Annie Barrows

I don't really remember liking this book when I first read it (I didn't dislike it either though). I do remember distinctly thinking Dawsey was a 70-year-old man. Spoilers (but not really), he's not and this time around I caught all the references to how he's not 70 years old. But his character really feels like a 70 year old man.

 

I mostly reread this one because it was available on Overdrive and I needed something easy to pick up and put down when it's slow at work. If you liked this, give 84, Charing Cross Road a try. It's like Guernsey, but better. And real.

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text 2017-06-15 06:43
Imagining Society
The Sane Society - Erich Fromm
The End of History and the Last Man - Francis Fukuyama
World Order - Henry Kissinger

The whole life of the individual is nothing but the process of giving birth to himself; indeed, we should be fully born, when we die - although it is the tragic fate of most individuals to die before they are born.

 

Eric Fromm's, the Sane Society

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