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Search tags: suzanne-collins
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url 2018-04-26 19:51
The Great American Read: America’s 100 most-loved books
Anne of Green Gables Novels #1 - L M Montgomery
I, Alex Cross - James Patterson
A Separate Peace - John Knowles
The Eye of the World - Robert Jordan
Charlotte's Web - E.B. White,Garth Williams,Rosemary Wells
Moby Dick - Herman Melville,Frank Muller
The Martian - Andy Weir
The Hobbit & The Lord of the Rings - J.R.R. Tolkien
The Hunger Games - Suzanne Collins
The Sun Also Rises - Ernest Hemingway

Voting starts May 22 and ends October 2018.  See link for more of the 100 nominees.

 

I'm about this but do wish they had done it by categories or even time periods (I.e., published before 1900, before 1950, before 2000, type of splits).  I agree that those are 100 of the most read, most popular and even most influential books.

 

I just mean it's weird seeing beloved childhood books like Charlotte's Web and Anne of Green Gables up against Carch 22, Then There Were None, and long running contemporary series like Alex Cross and Wheel of Time?

 

Then the hordes of fans for Twilight, Fifty Shades of Gray, Pride and Prejudice, Harry Potter  ...

 

(I am not at all disrespecting Harry Potter; frankly I think those books are responsible for an entire generation of readers.  It's just weird to see it up against the other nominees.)

 

How would you vote -- a childhood favorite that made you a reader or your favorite recent read?

Source: www.pbs.org/the-great-american-read/books/#
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text 2018-04-09 14:07
The Hunger Games - Suzanne Collins

The Hunger Games is a spectacular novel by Suzanne Collins. The novel is a dystopian YA novel, which is one of my favorite genres, aside from fantasy. Recent fantasy titles i have read include Eragon by Christopher Paolini, and Nimona by Noelle Stevenson. 

    The Hunger Games is about Katniss Everdeen,, who lives in District 12. The nation of Panem holds a yearly event called the Hunger Games, in which 24 children who's age range from 12 to 18 are thrown into an arena to fight to the death. Katniss's little sister, Prim, gets chosen for the games, and Katniss volunteers in her place. Several connections i have made is that Panem is North America after a war. District 12 is in present day Pennsylvania, which i have inferred from all the coal mining. The Capitol is in present day Colorado. Right now, in the book, Katniss just ended the opening ceremony. Her and her fellow District 12 tribute, Peeta, wore these outfits that had fake fire on the. These outfits were made by Cinna, one of Katniss's helpers in the Capitol, and one of the few that seems normal. Many other Capitol people, like Effie Trinket, are very gaudy and over the top. 

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text 2017-11-03 17:20
The Hunger Games - Suzanne Collins

Wofür so ne Woche krank zu Hause im Sessel lümmeln nicht alles gut ist. Man kann zum Beispiel sämtliche televisuellen Bildungslücken auffüllen. Genau das habe ich dann auch gemacht, und schwuppdiwuppdi alle Hunger-Games Filme hintereinander weggeschaut. Zurückgeblieben ist das nagenden Gefühl, dass man die Bücher doch auch noch mal lesen könnte. 

 

Gesagt, getan. Zumindest Band 1

 

Abgesehen von der wunderbaren Dystopie, die zum Zehennägeln kräuseln ist, gefällt mir hier die subkutane Liebesgeschichte ganz besonders gut. Oder man könnte sagen dieses Buch vertritt gleich zwei meiner favorisierten Genres: Negative Zukunftsvisionen und Liebesgeschichten die spannend bleiben, weil sich A und B nur in Paralleluniversen zu finden scheinen. Was will man mehr? 

Noch dazu lässt sich das Buch in einem Rutsch Weglesen und es gibt keine langweiligen Passagen. Das liegt nicht zuletzt daran, dass die Geschichte aus der Perspektive der Protagonistin erzählt wird, die einen ausnahmsweise mal nicht aufgrund nervenaufreibender Naivität in den Wahnsinn treibt (außer vielleicht was zwischenmenschliche Beziehungen angeht). Ganz im Gegenteil sie ist nüchtern, aber nicht Gefühlskalt und es bleiben uns ätzende Sprünge durch diverse Erzählstränge und Handlungszweige erspart.

 

Nichtsdestotrotz. Mal einen Moment innehalten und darüber sinnieren, was die Autorin hier für eine kranke Welt erschaffen hat. Gruselig. Und dabei gar nicht mal so abwegig.

 

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review 2017-08-31 02:47
Book 49/100: Gregor the Overlander by Suzanne Collins
Gregor the Overlander - Suzanne Collins

Usually I am not a huge fan of the "child falls into another world" sub-genre of fantasy, but this one was better than most.

It took quite a while to get going -- about 25 percent of the book is spent just on worldbuilding and introducing characters and the concept of "The Underland." I got a little lost in this part, admittedly, since I was listening to it in the first days after coming home from the hospital and giving birth, so I was sleep-deprived and had trouble keeping track of characters. But it all eventually straightened itself out enough for me to enjoy the world-building, which, while not intricate, was at least unique. I liked how Collins took real-world elements and morphed them into a sort of strange, half-dream, half-nightmare type society where cockroaches and bats are big enough to ride and rats are at war with humans. Some of the characters were more developed than others, but the character of the rat Ripred is probably what bumped this from a three to a four-star book to me. That, and the fact that it was not afraid to get dark in places, that the "rescue of the father" storyline reminded me pleasantly of "A Wrinkle in Time," and its ultimate message.

It doesn't hold a candle to "The Hunger Games" trilogy, but it's a solid middle-grade offering, especially within a sub-genre that is generally not my favorite. Probably won't read the rest in the series, but wouldn't hesitate to recommend for this age group.

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text 2017-07-31 23:57
How Early Motherhood Has Changed My Reading Life
The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding - La Leche League International,Gwen Gotsch
The Blue Jay's Dance: A Birth Year - Louise Erdrich
How to Raise a Family on Less Than Two Incomes: The Complete Guide to Managing Your Money Better So You Can Spend More Time with Your Kids - Denise Topolnicki
Gregor the Overlander - Suzanne Collins
Best Lunch Box Ever: Ideas and Recipes for School Lunches Kids Will Love - Katie Sullivan Morford
Modern Romance - Aziz Ansari,Eric Klinenberg
Good Night South Dakota - Adam Gamble,Mark Jasper,Ruth Palmer

Ten days ago, I became a mother when my son was lifted out of my abdomen behind a curtain, his cries filling the room and my heart welling up with relief. It was a long labor -- 30 hours by the time he arrived -- fraught with run-of-the-mill complications -- meconium in the amniotic fluid, a labor that failed to progress leading to a multitude of interventions I hadn't really wanted (but that I was grateful for in the end), and a baby that ultimately just wasn't in the right position or of the right size to pass through the birth canal, despite the best efforts of my husband, myself, my doula and my baby to make it happen.

 

This is my first time writing anything at all since that day, although there has been so much to say -- more to say than I can wrap my head around, and so little time in which to say it. As I write this, my son hangs off of me in a sling, sleeping in a diaper with his little chest puffing up and down. This is my first proof that I can find a way to make writing and motherhood compatible -- I failed fairly miserably at writing throughout my pregnancy, when the best I could do was book reviews and journal entries a few times a week after I soldiered through a NaNoWriMo novel while feeling like I was going to puke at any and every moment in the first trimester.

 

When my husband and I had our final meeting with our doula before labor, she reminded us that at the end of pregnancy and during early parenthood, we would have to get used to doing things on a "small" scale. Smaller meals to ward off heartburn. Small naps when the discomforts of late pregnancy made it hard to sleep through the night, and when a newborn's nursing schedule caused even more sleep disruption. Small breaks to connect with my husband, relax, watch a TV show or movie, play a game. I've noticed that my reading life has also become "smaller," although these snatches of pages that I find time for here and there somehow seem more nourishing than they ever have before.

 

Nursing and a reluctance to wake a baby who has fallen asleep on my body often confines me to the same location for hours at a time. This means I read what is within reach, and my inability to be monogamous with books has reached a whole new level.

 

At the rocking chair where I nurse my son, I have a copy of "The Blue Jay's Dance" by Louis Erdrich that I read a page or two from when I can't bear to look at my phone screen for another moment. My MP3 player is also within reach of that chair, so I listen to "Gregor the Overlander" for my book club, although I'm skeptical about whether I will finish it on time for our meeting on Thursday. Also, I listened to so much of the beginning section while sleep deprived in those first few days that I am playing catch up on who some of the major characters are. I always feel especially incompetent as a reader when I have trouble following a middle-grade novel -- and no, this is not the first time that it's happened, although I arguably have the best excuse now that I've ever had.

 

In bed, I pull "The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding" down from the parenting reference bookshelf behind the bed and read it during those long late-night feedings.

 

In the basement, where I used to do the majority of my "pleasure reading," I read "How to Raise a Family on Less Than Two Incomes" while I wait for my husband to be ready to watch TV or play a game together. My time in the basement is limited -- because of the C-section, I can only do one "stair trip" a day, and I stay down there only as long as my bladder holds out. Then the books and TV set and all the baby clothes and baby supplies on that floor are again out of my reach for the rest of the day.

 

I page through cookbooks at coffee shops while I wait for my husband to finish a political meeting. I listen to Aziz Ansari's "Modern Romance" on the car's CD system as I nurse my baby between any errands that take us away from home for more than two hours. I wonder whether my son recognizes Ansari's voice from the time I spent listening while he was still inside the womb.

 

My progress through these books is very, very slow. When my son is awake and alert on my lap, I put them all aside so I can read to him from a couple board books that are also beside the rocking chair. There is a very good chance I will not meet my goal of reading 100 books this year, but I will continue to fill my eyes with words at any chance I get -- and perhaps that more than anything keeps me feeling connected to the person I have always been as I make sense of the person I have been in the process of becoming ever since I saw that plus sign on a pregnancy test at the beginning of November.

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