logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: t-kingfisher
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-12-08 08:06
Swordheart - T. Kingfisher

Absolutely marvelous!!! And it's the beginning of a trilogy!!! Which means hurrah for more and oh damn, I have to wait for the author to write that more. May she write fast as well as brilliantly.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-11-29 01:58
The Wonder Engine by T. Kingfisher
The Wonder Engine - T. Kingfisher

Series: Clocktaur War #2

 

This wraps up the short Clocktaur War duology. I didn't particularly enjoy the romance in this one although I appreciate the way it was done. I'm mostly giving this one three stars because it the dialogue had me giggling to myself on several occasions.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-11-24 04:12
The Reign of the Kingfisher: A Novel
The Reign of the Kingfisher: A Novel - Thomas H. Martinson

I received this book via Goodreads First Reads program in exchanged for an honest review.

 

The legacy of Chicago’s very own, mostly forgotten, superhero suddenly becomes center stage when a gunman demands the police come clean on the hero’s supposed death or innocent people will die.  T.J. Martinson’s debut novel, The Reign of the Kingfisher, follows several characters attempting to stop the gunman in their separate ways before coming together and using the information they collected to help stop the gunman.

 

Early in the morning of a soon-to-be hot Chicago summer day, a retired journalist is awakened by a call from Chicago Chief of Police and sees a video of a gunman claiming that the CPD helped the Kingfisher fake his death and demand they come clean before killing a hostage and threatening several more with the same fate.  Recognizing the victim as someone he interviewed for his book about the superhero, the journalist gets concerned about others which gets the attention of a CPD detective who has a suspended CPD officer look into the journalist’s list.  Meanwhile a hacktivist is angry that the gunman is claiming to be a part of her group and to stop him hacks the CPD database to get a medical exam of the Kingfisher case to prove he might be alive only for the gunman to kill another hostage.  After several up and downs, the four characters come together and are able bring their talents and discovers together to bring resolution to the situation.

 

This mystery with a fantasy twist begins with an intriguing premise and some interesting flashbacks, halfway through the book I came up with three possible ways it could play out or in various combinations which made me look forward to see how things would end.  However, while I correctly picked the villain and partially got the ending scenario right that doesn’t mean I was satisfied with the book.  While the three main and two (or three) secondary characters all came out of central casting, that didn’t make them bad as they started off interesting and developed well.  However they either stopped developing to become stale or began doing and saying things that was completely out of the blue from where they had been heading (or both), which undercut the quality of the storytelling.  In addition some of the minor subplots, in particular the Police Chief’s, were detrimental to the overall book once it was over.

 

The Reign of the Kingfisher has a great premise, but unfortunately it doesn’t really achieve its potential.  While T.J. Martinson might just be beginning a long career, his debut novel is a mixture of good and bad that in the end makes the reader think about how good a book it could have been.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-25 23:50
Clockwork Boys by T. Kingfisher - My Thoughts
Clockwork Boys - T. Kingfisher

This was a good, fun, intriguing read, despite how long it took me to finish it.  I was suffering from a bad cold and could not concentrate for long periods of time.

That being said, I totally enjoyed the 3 main characters and their 'misfittedness'.  There is a lot of snark back and forth which made me chuckle.  And while one of the main characters is indeed a paladin, he's not insufferably upright.  Well, not really.  Just enough to make it fun.

The one glaring downfall to this book - for me - is that it ends rather abruptly.  Not exactly a cliffhanger, but honestly?... not many questions have been answered.  The book felt more like Part One of a two or three part novel.  Even in the author's notes, reference was made to the fact that it was originally 130K + in draft form so it was split into two.  Honestly?  I'd have preferred the whole thing.  So I docked a half a point for that, because things like that matter to me and my reading enjoyment.

Anyway, it's a fun, sometimes dark, swords and sorcery adventure with great dialogue and memorable characters and I WILL be picking up the second book.  :)

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-08-04 06:31
Kat Stone — and her wonderful wigs — are back
The Blue Kingfisher - Erica Wright

So, Kat Stone, private investigator, is trying something new -- she's being herself. No disguise, no wig, no fake name (well, most of the time). There's no need, the person she was hiding from has found her. He hasn't done anything about it -- but there's no need to go to extra effort. But she's not used to just being Kat Stone anymore -- and that's going to take a little work.

 

One morning, Kat finds a body -- a body in horrible shape in the shadow of the George Washington Bridge. While waiting for the police, she recognizes the body -- the maintenance man from her apartment building, Tambo Campion. The police are quick to dismiss the death as a suicide, but Kat's unconvinced. Why would someone trying to kill themselves miss the water so completely?

 

This, of course, isn't enough. So she ignores paying customers for a bit to launch her own investigation, trying to find more evidence. She doesn't necessarily have to find the murderer, she just needs more evidence to get anyone in the NYPD to take her seriously enough to investigate his death. She plunges into Tambo's life -- partially driven by guilt that she didn't pay him enough attention in life. It turns out that Tambo is a kingfisher, someone who finds jobs for people who aren't in the country legally or who are wanting to stay off-the-radar, for a fee. This alone provides several avenues of investigation. But there are others, too, don't get me wrong. All of these take her into all sorts of corners of NYC society -- and gives her an excuse to dabble in different identities.

 

The NYPD requirement of "more evidence" is a trigger of sorts for her. It reminds her of the constant refrain from her superiors during her undercover days at the NYPD. They always wanted more evidence -- even when she becomes concerned for her own safety, they say she hasn't done enough, she needs more evidence to bring down Salvatore Magrelli. Between the Magrelli knowing where she is now, and this requirement, Kat spends a lot of time ruminating on the times she felt most threatened by Magrelli -- and the things she didn't provide enough evidence on. While she has several other things going on in her life, these are the thoughts that dominate her attention.

 

As interesting as the murder case is, obviously, it's the Magrelli (past and present) stories that provide the major emotional hook for this novel. Even while she's meeting with success at Kat Stone, even when she finds evidence of a crime -- multiple crimes, actually. She can't get out of the shadow of her past or the threat of the present.

 

I failed to get around to reading the first book in this series, after reading The Granite Moth, which really bugs me, so I can't really comment between the ties between it and this book, but I'm reasonably certain there are some. Characters from The Granite Moth show up here and events from it are discussed as well, which is always nice, too many PI novels ignore what happened before. I don't know (but I can't imagine) that too many people from The Blue Kingfisher will show up down the road, but I'll be happy to see any of them that do. But several events from this book will show up soon.

 

I remembered liking Kat Stone - I didn't remember how much or why I did, and I'm very glad I got to rediscover her. Kat is clever, very clever when she's not distracted. She's resourceful. She may not have the skills of Lori Anderson or even Charlie Fox when it comes to weapons or hand-to-hand, but she's got a mental toughness that's hard to beat. And I really hope to see how she moves forward -- because there's just no way that what comes next is going to look too much like what's come before, and I'm very curious about that. The New York she travels in isn't the one I'm used to seeing (it's not so different that I don't recognize it) in Crime Fiction, and the way she sees the world is a fresh perspective.

 

The writing in this one -- and this is not a knock on The Granite Moth -- feels more disciplined, the plot more controlled. I took it as a sign of growth, that whatever Wright intended to accomplish in this book was clear to her and she executed things to that end. I'm almost more curious about what she'll do next than what Kat will do next. Almost.

 

This isn't a criticism, this is more of a wonderment: There is a lot of time spent on Kat's affection for New York City. Do people spend a lot of time doing that, really? Thinking about how much they love/appreciate the town they live in (assuming they do)? Her leaving town was brought up once -- indirectly -- but it wasn't like anyone was really suggesting that to her -- and even after she made it clear that it wouldn't happen, there it is again, her love for NYC. I could see it fitting in if people were actively trying to get her to move, or if she'd just returned after some time away (on a job, in self-appointed exile, etc.) -- but given her situation, it felt forced. Now, I liked the way she expressed it, and I can understand her affection (theoretically, anyway, I've never been there). It just seemed out-of-place and/or unnecessary.

 

This is a good, satisfying PI novel with a protagonist that you will definitely enjoy. Like its predecessor, it's a decent jumping on point for a new reader, and a welcome return to the world for someone who's met Kat before. I'm eagerly awaiting the next book in this series already.

 

Disclaimer: I received this eARC from Polis Books via NetGalley in exchange for this post -- thanks to both for this.

Source: irresponsiblereader.com/2018/08/03/the-blue-kingfisher-by-erica-wright-kat-stone-and-her-wonderful-wigs-are-back-for-more-danger
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?