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review 2017-12-16 08:00
Road Kill: A Serial Killer Novella (Terror Collection) by Shawn Raiford
Road Kill: A Serial Killer Novella-Terro... Road Kill: A Serial Killer Novella-Terror Collection (Kindle Single) - Shawn Raiford Road Kill: A Serial Killer Novella (Terror Collection) by Shawn Raiford is an novella about Ana who is not a victim. She's tired and wants to sleep. It was graphically written and a difficult story to read. The subject matter was creepy and it needs editing for grammar. It left me feeling disturbed and depressed. I gave it almost four stars. "Ana had gone to psychologists to help her with her anger management problem. Her doctor always told her, 'Words are just sound traveling through the air and cannot physically harm you. It's up to you how you react to them.' Ana understood the doctor but words also had meaning to people. To her." I received a complimentary Kindle copy in an Amazon promotion. That did not change my opinion for this review. Link to purchase: https://www.amazon.com/Road-Kill-Serial-Novella-Collection-ebook/dp/B0192DPJU6
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review 2017-11-30 00:00
Against the Double Blackmail: Refugees, Terror and Other Troubles with the Neighbours
Against the Double Blackmail: Refugees, Terror and Other Troubles with the Neighbours - Slavoj Žižek Not sure what to think about this. It is a relative short polemic on the problems faced, mainly by Europe, by the refugee issue. Though short it is densely written and academic, so not an easy read. Not sure that I followed all his arguments but he certainly lays into global capitalism, colonialism and Western Liberal values, values that generally I espouse.
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review 2017-11-11 22:17
Excellent historical perspective on the genre
The Tale Of Terror: A Study Of The Gothic Fiction - Edith Birkhead

Disclosure:  I acquired a free Kindle edition of this public domain work.

 

Although a bit dry at times, Edith Birkhead's 1921 study of gothic fiction is still a valuable resource for anyone wishing to understand the evolution of the genre.  Her insights remain relevant even a century (almost) later.

 

She starts with Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto and moves forward into the novels of Mrs. Radcliffe, Matthew "Monk" Lewis, and others at the end of the eighteenth century.  The connections she makes between the authors and the books they read as well as the books they wrote was interesting.  Too often, literary analysts seem to assume the books write themselves and evolve one after the other without human intervention.

 

Many of the books and authors cited have of course been classics for a very long time, but others are less well known and less available even in this age of digitization.  It's going to be fun tracking down some of these unfamiliar titles.

 

One aspect I found particularly interesting, and again given that this was written nearly a hundred years ago, was that Ms. Birkhead recognized the integration of aspects of the gothic story into other genres of fiction, whether bringing elements of the supernatural into the mundane setting such as The Picture of Dorian Grey, or allowing natural fear and terror to heighten the reader's excitement and interest, as in The Prisoner of Zenda.

 

The edition I obtained is complete with footnotes and index, which will be very useful.

 

Recommended.

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quote 2017-10-31 04:22
¨You don´t understand at all,¨ said the wizard wearily. ¨I'm so scared of you my spine has turned to jelly, It´s just that I´m suffering from an overdose of terror right now. I mean, when I've got over that then I´ll have time to be decently frightened of you.¨

Page 6
The Color of Magic - Terry Pratchett

The Color of Magic - Terry Pratchett 

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text 2017-10-30 00:55
Reading progress update: I've read 53%. or When Technology hiccups and gives us a chuckle
The Tale Of Terror: A Study Of The Gothic Fiction - Edith Birkhead

Many of these public domain works have been republished using OCR scanners, which occasionally misread things.  There are supposed to be proofreaders, but I guess they aren't perfect, either.  I wouldn't have caught this one if I weren't simultaneously reading Northanger Abbey.

 

Nor is Catherine aided in her career by those "improbable events," so dear to romance, that serve to introduce a hero—a robber's attack, a tempest, or a carriage accident. With a sly glance at such dangerous characters as Lady Greystock in The Children of the Abbey (1798), Miss Austen creates the inert, but good-natured Mrs. Alien as Catherine's chaperone in Bath:

 

"It is now expedient to give some description of Mrs. Alien that the reader may be able to judge in what manner her actions will hereafter tend to promote the general distress of the work and how she will probably contribute to reduce poor Catherine to all the desperate wretchedness of which a last volume is capable, whether by her imprudence, vulgarity or jealousy—whether by intercepting her letters, ruining her character or turning her out of doors."

Birkhead, Edith. The Tale of Terror A Study of the Gothic Romance (p. 74). Kindle Edition.

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