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review 2017-10-24 21:04
This was surprisingly good!
Eye of the Tiger: A Paranormal Space Opera Adventure (Star Justice) (Volume 1) - Michael-Scott Earle

The title, the kitschy cover - the whole tiger-man thing.

 

But it was a good read! Not exactly totally original or beautifully worded, but the story had a fast pace and the characters were interesting enough to keep me interested in their fate.

 

I might pick up the next one in this series...

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text 2017-10-24 20:04
White Tiger By Jennifer Ashley $1.99 Great Series!
White Tiger - Jennifer Ashley

Wanted and on the run...
 
For twenty years, Kendrick, a white tiger Shifter, has been the Guardian of un-Collared Shifters who spend their lives living in secret—and in fear of being shunted into Shiftertowns. When Kendrick’s group is discovered and forced to flee, Kendrick is more desperate than ever to protect them
 
His only salvation was in a beautiful stranger.
 
In a diner in the middle of nowhere, lonely waitress Addison Price has seen a lot of unusual drifters come and go, but none has ever captivated—and intimidated—her like the imposing fugitive who wields a broadsword with incredible skill. But when he risks all to protect her, Addison’s fear turns to empathy—and empathy to desire as she learns more about her savior. Soon she’s more than willing to help the crushingly sensual white tiger and his cubs in a passionate bid for freedom. Whatever the cost.

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review 2017-10-07 12:26
Treasured by a Tiger - Felicity E. Heaton

*Disclaimer: I received an eARC of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review. This does not influence my rating or the content of my review in any way.

 

It seems I have discovered yet another great series to get hooked on. This was my first Felicity Heaton book and let me tell you, I loved it.

 

There are some really cool things happening in this book, starting with the characters, which are really awesome, not just the main ones, but the secondary ones too, and with the various plots woven together. I loved the description of Hell, so different than what I've read before, and I love the fact that it truly looks like a place no one would willingly go to. I'm curious what other realms are there, besides Heaven, Hell and Earth. I also want to know more about the various creatures in this series, some of which we read about in this book.

 

I really liked reading about Grey and Lyra. Their stories are very different, yet I liked seeing how well matched they were. Grey is a very special tiger shifter, that unfortunately has been treated like crap by his pride just because he looked differently, which made me really angry. I loved how Lyra addressed that and showed him that he wasn't a freak, that he was beautiful because he was different. I was also sad for Grey, because, judging by what he tells Lyra about himself, you can see how lost he is, now that his sister found her mate, since he no longer needs to be the one in charge of her safety. You can really tell that that's basically why he went to Hell, why he's taking the risks he's taking, because he's lost and doesn't really know what to do with himself. I wanted to hug him most of the time, to be honest.

 

Lyra was a fantastic heroine. I love the fact that she's as much of a badass as Grey, and that she doesn't play the role of damsel in distress, when she really could and no one would blame her. I also loved the fact that once she learns about Grey's heritage, and understands that he doesn't know how to deal with some of his instincts, she doesn't hold that against him, but actually understands them and accepts the fact that he's not like other males that she's known and heard about, and actually tries to help him.

 

The major subplot, that I hope will be addressed in the next book, is one involving dragons. DRAGONS! *Allow me a moment to hyperventilate in an excited puppy manner* I really loved that, and I loved what Grey did at the end for one particular dragon, I thought that was really sweet and it showed how honorable he is, and how much his pride is losing for treating him as they did.

 

The book is really fast paced, I managed to read it pretty quickly, and I loved how the ending was neatly tied for Grey and Lyra, but also left the possibility of seeing them in the future open. I also loved the little hints towards the next book or books. I will admit I felt a little bit lost in the beginning, just because I wished I had more background information that is most definitely in previous books, but that didn't keep me from fully enjoying the story.

 

Based on this book, I can tell I'll be hooked on this series forever, because it reminded me of the older paranormal series, the ones that I so love and adore. So I'll definitely go back to the beginning and read this series in order, because I don't want to miss any details. So if you love paranormal romance, definitely check this series out if you haven't already.

Source: rubys-books.blogspot.com
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text 2017-10-01 17:03
A mini-project: Capital Crimes
Murder in the Museum (British Library Crime Classics) - John Rowland
Capital Crimes: London Mysteries: A British Library Crime Classic (British Library Crime Classics) - Martin Edwards
Lord Edgware Dies - Agatha Christie
The Tiger in the Smoke - Margery Allingham

I decided to do a little mini-exploration of vintage mysteries set in London, to go along with my read of Murder in Piccadilly! I snagged this one, & also bought the "Capital Crimes" BLCC anthology edited by Martin Edwards.

 

I already own Lord Edgware Dies, which takes place in London, so I'm going to give that one a reread as well, and possibly Margery Allingham's The Tiger in the Smoke, also mentioned by Edwards in the chapter on murders set in London, to round out the group.

 

In the middle of this, I'll also still be joining in the buddy read for Murder of a Lady late this week! Can't wait!

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review 2017-09-28 21:30
Diverse Square (Spoilers)
The Tiger's Daughter - K. Arsenault Rivera
** spoiler alert **
 
 
Disclaimer: I received a free copy from Tor as part of a Librarything giveaway/first read program. Also, spoilers.

I wanted to love this book. When I first started reading the novel, it was exactly what I needed. A novel where the chosen one or ones is/are female, I so need that, especially with all the movies and shows about men doing great things. The book drew me in right away, and the first night I did not want to put it down. The second day, I still enjoyed it, but I was a little confused by a few things – one of which was the setting and character names. The setting seemed to be a fantastical China. There was a wall that the mother of one of the characters destroyed. There seems to be one society that is de facto Chinese, and another that is de facto Mongol. There are steppes on the map for crying out aloud. The strange thing was that some of the names seemed to be Japanese. But I am not an expert on Japanese or Chinese culture. To be honest, the only reason I noticed that Japanese influence was because I had read Johnson, Dalkey, and the Tale of Heike. I do know, however, that any combination of Chinese and Japanese cultures (or any Asian culture with another for that matter) is problematic for several reasons, including what happened during WW II. 

Then I read Laurelinvanyr’s review where she goes into detail about the problems with the names used in the novel as well as other cultural issues. I strongly suggest any potential reader of the book reads that review. It’s true that a counter to many of the points that Laurelinvanyr makes would be the simple “it is a fantasy setting that has been inspired by various cultures” excuse that is used for more than fantasy novels. It is also true that this is not the only book that has inaccuracies. Hell, you even get them in a book that is set in say America but written by a Brit. At the very least, there is not enough world building to account for the combination. Laurelinvanyr’s more knowledgeable review goes into far more detail about this problem (and there are other reviews that mention the same issues but in less detail. There is hardly only one review that raises the questions of bad research, cultural approbation and fetishism). Additionally, it is possible/very likely that the use of language and cultural comments by some characters was there to show racism between the Empire and Qorin. The problem is that racism is never really direct dealt with, at least on the part of the Qorin and not really very well in the Empire.

In addition to the question about the world building, there are other problems with the book, that are glaring from a structural and storytelling point of view only.

It is impossible to discuss these without spoilers, so this is your last spoiler warning.

The first problem is the conceit – the idea that whole book is one very long letter that one heroine writes to the other. This works in the beginning but makes no sense later on because why would you write such a detailed letter to someone who was there and experiencing most of what are you writing about with you? You wouldn’t. Not in such a detailed way. (There also is a section where it seems to take a character two years to make a bow, seriously). If this was an actual exchange of letters this would be different, but it isn’t.

The second problem is that because you know the letter is being written after the events described, you know the two central characters are going to be okay. This lack of tension might be replaced with the tension regarding whether they are going to get their happy ever after. Normally, it would be, but the question of whether love can overcome the forced separation is dealt with so quickly that there isn’t any. Not really.

To be honest, the second half of the book feels like little more than a set-up for the second volume. Part of the draw of the first part of the book is the idea that both heroines are somehow divine. This is important for two reasons. The first is that it explains the powers that each girl has (though one power is more developed). The second is it explains why despite the young age of both heroines (both are under eighteen for the whole book), they act so much older, for there is a long tradition in epics, regardless of culture, for such divine or semi-divine heroes to be older than their years. This semi-divine status seems forgotten when one of the characters becomes vampire like (something that most say they are frightened of but no one acts like it). It is to seek a cure for this problem that one woman journeys to what seems to be an Underworld. Sounds interesting, no? Happens entirely off page and is most likely a hook for the second novel in the series. But why would you read that when you know she succeeds? It was a total cheat of an ending.

And finally, there were two smaller things that disquieted me. The first is the relationship between an older woman and a young woman. It is unclear whether they are another lesbian couple, it is strongly suggested that they are. I don’t care that they are couple because of their gender. I have a problem with an adult, in this an aunt, sleeping with niece. I just do. Not only does violate the incest taboo that many culture, fantasy and otherwise, have, but quite frankly, there is something off putting by someone who is family member who helped raise you, taking you as a lover. I hate this when it is a man and woman relationship, and I still hate it when it is a woman/woman one. Sorry. Additionally, there is an incident of spousal abuse. One character is possessed/dealing with vampire traits when she attacks her girlfriend. That’s fine. It’s an interesting idea as is the struggle to contain the vampire cravings. Handled well it would have been a good thing to explore. But nope, everyone, even the woman who was almost struggled, seems to get over it in a few pages.

Promising start. Disappointing ending.


 
 

 

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