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review 2018-09-23 17:05
5 STARS for this story that lives up to its amazing cover...
Contagion - Erin Bowman

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~BOOK BLURB~

Contagion

Erin Bowman

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IT GOT IN US

 

After receiving an urgent SOS from a work detail on a distant planet, a skeleton crew is dispatched to perform a standard search-and-rescue mission.

 

MOST ARE DEAD

 

But when the crew arrives, they find an abandoned site, littered with rotten food, discarded weapons…and dead bodies.

 

DON’T SET FOOT HERE AGAIN

 

As they try to piece together who—or what—could have decimated an entire operation, they discover that some things are best left buried—and some monsters are only too ready to awaken.

 

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~MY QUICKIE REVIEW~

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I wasn't sure what to expect with this…the only other books by Erin Bowman that I've read have been YA Westerns.  This is way different than those books.  I'll admit, early on, I thought she was jumping on the bandwagon, so to speak, with this deep space horror/thriller based on a crazy virus.  It felt an awful lot like Illuminae.  Within no time though, that thought was out of my head, because I was hooked on this compelling story.  With zombie-like symptoms, this mysterious virus is seriously frightening.  It does end on a total cliffhanger, but I'm not even upset about that because I cannot wait to listen to the second book which is set to come out in July of 2019.

 

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~MY RATING~

5STARS - GRADE=A+

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~BREAKDOWN OF RATINGS~

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Plot~ 5/5

Main Characters~ 5/5

Secondary Characters~ 5/5

The Feels~ 4.8/5

Pacing~ 5/5

Addictiveness~ 4.8/5

Theme or Tone~ 5/5

Flow (Writing Style)~ 5/5

Backdrop (World Building)~ 4.5/5

Originality~ 4.8/5

Ending~ 5/5  Cliffhanger~ Yeah…you could say that.

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Book Cover~ Love it…especially the colors in it.

Narration~ Amy McFadden

Series~ Contagion #1

Setting~  The Planet Achlys

Source~ Audiobook (Library)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

I used this for Dead Lands Square in Halloween Bingo 2018

 

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review 2018-09-01 23:01
Spiral by Koji Suzuki, translated by Glynne Walley
Spiral - Glynne Walley,Koji Suzuki

Spiral begins hours after Ring's ending and stars Ando, a medical examiner who was once classmates with Ryuji, one of the main characters in Ring. Ando performs Ryuji's autopsy and is intrigued by several findings. First, Ryuji died of sudden heart failure despite being otherwise very healthy. Second, he has a mysterious ulcer in his throat. Further tests eventually reveal that Ryuji may have been killed by a virus that bears an eerie resemblance to smallpox. As Ando investigates, he learns of several other victims. But how is the virus transmitted? What does it do? And why did one man who was exposed to it, Asakawa, survive? The case takes on greater urgency when Mai, Ryuji's lover, disappears. Was she exposed via Ryuji somehow, and can she still be saved?

I highly recommend that those who haven't read the first book, Ring, do so before reading this one. And then maybe just stop there. Although Spiral tied up a few of Ring's loose ends, I didn't consider it to be a worthwhile continuation.

Suzuki attempted to make Sadako's curse more scientific rather than supernatural in this book, and it really didn't work for me. I could accept that the curse was virus-like in its transmission and requirements, but Suzuki also had it behaving

both like a sperm and an egg (just because it happened to sort of look like them?). Also, Suzuki envisioned DNA producing exact replicas of people, right down to their memories up to some point before their original death ("junk DNA" is a recording of a person's memories, or some nonsense like that). This went way beyond what I was willing to accept, even in a horror series featuring a killer videotape.

And the part where Suzuki gave Ryuji a special ability to communicate with Sadako made me want to bite something. There was no sign that Ryuji had any kind of paranormal abilities - he should not have been able to form an agreement with Sadako the way he did, or use his own corpse to create codes for Ando to decipher. And Sadako, considering her history, should have hated a rapist like Ryuji too much to let him somehow use her own abilities.

(spoiler show)


There were a few nicely creepy scenes, but for the most part Ring had a better and more unnerving atmosphere than Spiral. Ando spent a lot of time trying to figure out the stuff Asakawa had already figured out in the first book, and a little more time trying to figure out what Asakawa hadn't gotten wrong. There were a couple code deciphering sections that reminded me of parts of works like Soji Shimada's The Tokyo Zodiac Murders, inviting readers to decipher the codes along with Ando, but those ended up feeling more like filler than anything particularly useful. And speaking of filler, there was a excruciating 20-page summary of everything that happened in Ring, because apparently Suzuki couldn't trust that readers of Spiral had read the book before it. Yes, this section tied in with a discovery later in the book, but Suzuki could have accomplished the same thing in a couple pages.

Spiral reminded me a great deal of Hideaki Sena's Parasite Eve in the way it tried to incorporate science into its horrific supernatural developments, and also in the way it crapped on most of its few female characters.

I was cautiously optimistic that Mai would be a main character I could actually root for, despite her unfortunate affection for Ryuji. She seemed to be reasonably intelligent and not too much of a wet washcloth. Whereas Ando developed an instant crush on Mai, she spoke to him mostly out of a wish to maintain a connection to Ryuji and wasn't the slightest bit interested in any other sort of relationship with him. At the same time, she wasn't so attached to Ryuji as to fall completely apart after his death. She kept her professional commitments in mind and tried to fulfill them.

Unfortunately, my expectation that Mai would turn out to be one of the main characters of this book, working with Ando the way Ryuji worked with Asakawa in the first book, turned out to be way off the mark. After a couple on-page appearances, she disappeared from the text except as occasional motivation for Ando. Her ultimate fate depressed me, as did

Suzuki's reduction of women of child-bearing age to nothing more than potential incubators for Sadako.

(spoiler show)


Some of Ando's thoughts about Mai were bizarre and made me wonder if Suzuki had any idea about how female bodies work. When I first started the book, I snickered at the way Ando instantly concluded that Mai must be having her period because of one vague sentence from her and the fact that she looked pale. While I realize that some women have overly heavy or lengthy periods that can give them anemia, considering the situation I'd have assumed that Mai was pale because she was in shock at having discovered Ryuji's body only a few hours earlier. This thing about Mai having her period came up multiple times in the book, with Ando concluding each time that his intuition must have been correct. Ando also seemed to think it was perfectly natural for a grown woman's used underwear to smell like milk (yes, there's a part where he sniffs her underwear - it's one of the first things he does when he's left alone in her apartment).

I doubt I'll be continuing this series, and I kind of wish I had stopped after reading Ring. The new developments in Spiral made me more angry than excited. One thing I was left with was a desire to find and read more Japanese horror written by women. Unfortunately, it doesn't seem like much has been translated into English. I've already read Mariko Koike's The Graveyard Apartment and would welcome other recommendations.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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text 2018-08-22 09:09
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Diagnostics Market Opportunity Analysis, 2018 – 2026

Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is responsible for many chronic conditions such as pneumonia, bronchitis, asthma, and respiratory disease. It primarily affects neonates, infants and adults and is responsible for outpatient visits, hospitalization and death in some cases. Therefore, diagnosis of  RSV- associated diseases is crucial to avoid further medical severity. Symptoms of RSV presence include, rhinorrhea, cough, wheeze, respiratory distress, and hypoxemia. Molecular diagnostic is most widely used techniques for diagnosing RSV.

 

Click To Continue Reading on Respiratory Syncytial Virus Diagnostics Market

 

High prevalence of respiratory infections due to RSV is a major factor driving growth of the respiratory syncytial virus diagnostics market. According to a report by the Lancet, 2017, around 33·1 million episodes of RSV induced acute lower respiratory infections that resulted in around 3·2 million hospitalizations and around 59,600 in-hospital deaths in children younger than 5 years of age, worldwide, in 2015. Moreover, the report stated that the overall RSV- acute lower respiratory infections- related mortality was around 118200 in 2015.

 

Furthermore, high prevalence of several chronic conditions such as pneumonia and other respiratory tract infections due to RSV is a major factor contributing to growth of the market over the forecast period. For instance, according to a report by World Health Organization (WHO), May 2018, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lower respiratory tract infection are amongst top five chronic diseases with highest mortality rate, worldwide. The report stated that around 3 million each deaths were registered due to COPD and lower respiratory tract infection in 2016, worldwide.

 

On the basis of Geography, respiratory syncytial virus diagnostics market is segmented into North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Middle East, and Africa. North America is expected to be dominant in the respiratory syncytial virus diagnostics market over the forecast period.

 

According to study published in journal American Family Physician in 2017, around 2% to 3% of infants, younger than 12 months are hospitalized with an RSV infection, annually, in the U.S. As per same source, Around 57,500 hospitalizations and 2.1 million outpatient visits are associated with RSV infections in children younger than five years, annually, in the U.S. It can be concluded from epidemiological data that the U.S. has high potential for respiratory syncytial virus diagnostics market. Presence of key players and their products in North America would be another important driver for the market growth.

 

Asia Pacific and Latin America would witness highest CAGR in respiratory syncytial virus diagnostics market. According to study published in the Lancet in September 2017, lower middle income countries witnessed around 43,600 deaths due to RSV-ALRI whereas upper middle income countries witnessed around 17900 deaths, in 2015. Furthermore, children in this region often do not receive adequate vaccination, which leads to frequent infection incidences from variety of diseases including RSV. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2018, worldwide, around 86% of infants are vaccinated against 26 diseases. However, around 19.5 million children remain unvaccinated that leads to around 2-3 million deaths, annually, of which around 90% belong to low and middle income countries.

 

WHO is running the pilot projects of vaccination in countries of developing regions such Latin America, Africa, and Asia Pacific to achieve100% detection of the RSV infections amongst infants, neonates and children under five years of age.This is expected to reduce the mortality rate  and hospitalization from RSV associated acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI). It would also establish RSV diagnostic centers over the forecast period in these regions.

 

Request a sample copy of this report: https://www.coherentmarketinsights.com/insight/request-sample/2038 

 

Key Vendors:

F. Hoffmann La-Roche AG , Becton, Dickinson and Company, Novartis AG, Abbott Laboratories, Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc., BioMerieux, DiaSorin SPA, Millipore-sigma, Quidel Corporation, Alere Inc., Coris BioConcept, Fast-track Diagnostics, and Quest Diagnostics.

 

About Coherent Market Insights:

Coherent Market Insights is a prominent market research and consulting firm offering action-ready syndicated research reports, custom market analysis, consulting services, and competitive analysis through various recommendations related to emerging market trends, technologies, and potential absolute dollar opportunity.

 

Contact Us:

Mr. Shah
Coherent Market Insights
1001 4th Ave, #3200
Seattle, WA 98154
Tel: +1–206–701–6702
Email: sales@coherentmarketinsights.com

Visit our news Website: https://www.coherenttimes.org/

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review 2018-08-05 17:42
The Passage: Vampocalypse Now, or at Least 2008-ish
The Passage - Justin Cronin

It's twenty minutes into the future, and an aggrieved FBI agent is rounding up subjects that no one will miss. Twelve of them are death row inmates: the thirteenth is an abandoned six-year-old, Amy Bellafonte. They are to be injected with a serum from a Bolivian bat virus to create (all together now) super-soldiers. The "virals" get vampire-y, the vampires cause mayhem, and after breaking free they overrun the United States and possibly the world. But that's only about a third of the story.

 

Once this several-hundred-page build-up is out of the way, we cut to ninety years later. In a stockade in California called the Colony, the descendants of a few survivors rely on lights to repel the virals, and the rechargeable batteries that power those lights are wearing out. Incredibly, a "walker" shows up for the first time in decades. After a fracas getting her inside the walls, the community blames the members of the Watch whose decision led to a few deaths. Before mob justice can be completely executed, a small group of companions flee the Colony, determined to find out what has happened to the rest of the world and to solve the mystery of the walker – who is none other than Amy. Not only has she survived countless viral attacks, she's barely aged in all this time.

 

The plot that ensues is hard not to compare to "The Stand," primarily because it's a story about a diverse array of scrappy blue-collar heroes who confront evil by walking across post-apocalyptic America. The characters aren't exactly the same, but the feel is vintage Stephen King. Psychic powers, unethical government experiments, maternal black women, stashes of weapons that even the odds with terrifying monsters, Biblical overtones and the infrequent nuclear blast – all these elements are King oeuvre.

 

Of course, my question when reviewing is less "has it been done before?" but "is it being done well now?" And yeah, it's not bad. The build-up to the outbreak keeps the pages turning, and the backstories of the pre-outbreak characters build some sympathy. Post-apocalypse, the dramatic moments when someone is taken by virals but *isn't* instant vamp chow make sense most of the time and lead to characterization moments. And though there are sequels, there is a reasonable amount of closure at the end of the first book. Considering it's a hefty 879 pages in paperback, I'd be angry if there weren't.

 

There are weaknesses, of course. The post-apocalyptic characters are a little more interchangeable than the well-drawn ones of the beginning. When a human encampment seems too good to be true, the twist is predictable (though the exact particulars still make for a good scene). The apocalypse feels straight out of small-town America's 2005 anti-terror/disaster preparation fantasy rather than harsh reality, or at least the impassable highways full of abandoned vehicles and degraded fuel of "The Stand." It's hard not to think of Mad Max or its South Park parody when the people of the Colony refer to "The Time Before" and use other uninspired slang. And there's a minor deus ex machina for a few characters near the end, called out in dialogue but left unanswered in this volume. (At least it wasn't the literal Hand of God setting off a nuke in Las Vegas.)

 

All that said, "The Passage" still feels like a genuine epic, one of those novels that starts out like a horror show and morphs into a battle of good versus evil. And if Stephen King were the only person who could write such a story, the world would be a drearier place. It was obviously written during the height of the War on Terror, but there's one notable quotation that still rings true:

"All this time, we were hoping the Army would come to our rescue," says Alicia, "and it turns out the army is us."

3.5 out of 5

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review 2018-07-29 16:08
5 Out Of 5 "hacker-if-ic" STARS
This Mortal Coil - Emily Suvada

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~BOOK BLURB~

This Mortal Coil

Emily Suvada

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In this gripping debut novel, seventeen-year-old Cat must use her gene-hacking skills to decode her late father’s message concealing a vaccine to a horrifying plague.

 

Catarina Agatta is a hacker. She can cripple mainframes and crash through firewalls, but that’s not what makes her special. In Cat’s world, people are implanted with technology to recode their DNA, allowing them to change their bodies in any way they want. And Cat happens to be a gene-hacking genius.

 

That’s no surprise since Cat’s father is Dr. Lachlan Agatta, a legendary geneticist who may be the last hope for defeating a plague that has brought humanity to the brink of extinction. But during the outbreak, Lachlan was kidnapped by a shadowy organization called Cartaxus, leaving Cat to survive the last two years on her own.

 

When a Cartaxus soldier, Cole, arrives with news that her father has been killed, Cat’s instincts tell her it’s just another Cartaxus lie. But Cole also brings a message: before Lachlan died, he managed to create a vaccine, and Cole needs Cat’s help to release it and save the human race.

 

Now Cat must decide who she can trust: The soldier with secrets of his own? The father who made her promise to hide from Cartaxus at all costs? In a world where nature itself can be rewritten, how much can she even trust herself?

 

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~MY QUICKIE REVIEW~

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This book is amazing, one of the best dystopian's I've read in a while and absolutely a new favorite.  For a book involving gene hacking, splicing, decoding and lots of technical terms and such this is completely comprehensible and seriously compelling.  It also depicts a plaque virus with walking dead-like creatures that will explode and then infect anyone in a certain radius, plus some crazy plot twists that will blow your mind.  This book is pure genius.  There is also some romance…but it is done well and does not dominate the story, at least in my opinion, but I like some romance.  Book #2, This Cruel Design, comes out at the end of October.  I totally recommend!

 

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~MY RATING~

5STARS - GRADE=A+

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~BREAKDOWN OF RATINGS~

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Plot~ 5/5

Main Characters~ 5/5

Secondary Characters~ 5/5

The Feels~ 5/5

Pacing~ 5/5

Addictiveness~ 5/5

Theme or Tone~ 5/5

Flow (Writing Style)~ 5/5

Backdrop (World Building)~ 5/5

Originality~ 5/5

Ending~ 5/5 Cliffhanger~ "to be continued"

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Book Cover~ I Love It!

Narration~ 5 for Skye Bennett, I really liked her voice, she made this a breeze to listen to.

Series~ This Mortal Coil #1

Setting~ A Futuristic United States & some in Canada

Source~ Audiobook (Library)

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