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review 2017-06-24 02:52
[REVIEW] Phaedra by Jean Racine
Phaedra - Jean Racine,Richard Wilbur,Igor Tulipanov

I am surprised at how easy this was to read. After reading little bits on my commute, I sat down and finished it in a day.

Shame colors Phaedra’s life and blinds her completely to any solution other than death. She is not a reasonable person at any point until the very end when she has seen the consequence of her passion. She had hoped in vain that Hippolyte would return her feelings and save her from the shroud of guilt that covered her. Ultimately, he became so disgusted by her sentiments that it made her shame grow into a monster she couldn’t control and that would be the cause for Hippolyte’s unjust demise.

I was not a fan of the false rape accusation at all. It perpetuates this bullshit that women falsely accuse men of rape out of spite. Not here for this.

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review 2017-01-22 07:00
Charolette's Web
Charlotte's Web - Garth Williams,E.B. White,Kate DiCamillo

This book is a definite heart jerker. It's about a little girl, Fern, and a runt piglet she saves from her dad. Fern raises the piglet she names Wilbur until her father forces him out to the barn where is care is then taken over by a very ambitious spider. Together with the help of a rat, they do amazing things to ensure Wilbur gets to live a long and healthy life. I would recommend this book for 3rd grade and up. There are so many fun ways to use this book in the classroom. Depending on the grade level, I would love to use this book to do things like an indepth group book analysis (age appropriate) or individual book reports or even have the students use mixed media to create their own word web. 

Reading Level: 2nd grade to 6th grade 

LEX 680L

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review 2016-07-21 02:57
Children's Review: The Sockkids say No to bullying
The SockKids Say NO to Bullying - Shelley Larkin,Wilbur Wright, Alexandra Ripley, Mark Joseph, Miep Gies & Alison Leslie Gold,Michael John Sullivan

We received this book to give an honest review. 

 

K and I have read about the Sockkids before and enjoyed the adventure they went on. In this story we meet Ethan and Olivia and of course Sudsy and Wooly. The new kid Olivia keeps to herself and when Ethan sees that she enjoys reading like him he wants to make friends with her until a group of boys start picking on him because of it. When they tear up his book the sockkids Wooly and Sudsy come to the rescue and in doing so help introduce Olivia to Ethan. It goes to show that just because you are bullied you don't have to stay silent. Though I would have liked to have seen what the consequences to the boys that were bullying Ethan and others. 

After this incident it seems that Olivia and Ethan along with two other children become friends. 

 

As a parent I thought this was a good book to read to K and I truly enjoyed at the end of the story the information on bullying. From a small quiz to asking questions on if you are getting bullied.

This book is more for the ages maybe 7 on up just because the sentences are longer and I think that age group might understand the story a lot more than the younger kids. 

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text 2016-03-04 02:32
Picture books are not just for children
A Day with Wilbur Robinson - William Joyce

There were a few classes that I took as a Library Sciences major that really stuck with me. One was Reader's Advisory (how to help someone choose a book...sound familiar?) and the other was Children's Literature. As you already know, I absolutely love children's literature. However, I was led to believe that as an adult my enjoyment of picture books was over. WRONG! Some of the best picture books are the best because they appeal to all ages. I'm giving all of this backstory because today's review is of a picture book entitled A Day With Wilbur Robinson by William Joyce. When I discovered that one of my favorite animated movies (yes, those are for all ages as well), Meet the Robinsons, was actually adapted from a book...well I went and picked it up at the library, didn't I? The story is all about one magical day at the homestead of the Robinson family while they search for Grandfather's false teeth. Each member of the brood is more fantastical than the last and yet Wilbur claims that it's "dull". However, it's the artwork that brings it all together. Joyce's style evokes a 1950's vibe that is playful and still somewhat realistic. (I definitely believed the octopus butler real.) He considers his works to be "alarmingly optimistic" and I'd have to agree. (Remember the film Robots? He produced and designed it.) It's a fun read that I think anyone of any age would enjoy. 10/10

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2016-02-13 03:23
Picture books are not just for children
A Day with Wilbur Robinson - William Joyce

There were a few classes that I took as a Library Sciences major that really stuck with me. One was Reader's Advisory (how to help someone choose a book...sound familiar?) and the other was Children's Literature. As you already know, I absolutely love children's literature. However, I was led to believe that as an adult my enjoyment of picture books was over. WRONG! Some of the best picture books are the best because they appeal to all ages. I'm giving all of this backstory because today's review is of a picture book entitled A Day With Wilbur Robinson by William Joyce. When I discovered that one of my favorite animated movies (yes, those are for all ages as well), Meet the Robinsons, was actually adapted from a book...well I went and picked it up at the library, didn't I? The story is all about one magical day at the homestead of the Robinson family while they search for Grandfather's false teeth. Each member of the brood is more fantastical than the last and yet Wilbur claims that it's "dull". However, it's the artwork that brings it all together. Joyce's style evokes a 1950's vibe that is playful and still somewhat realistic. (I definitely believed the octopus butler real.) He considers his works to be "alarmingly optimistic" and I'd have to agree. (Remember the film Robots? He produced and designed it.) It's a fun read that I think anyone of any age would enjoy. 10/10

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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