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Search tags: \'modern-girl\'
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review 2017-10-09 03:56
The Penguin Book of Etiquette and Charm School
The Penguin Book Of Etiquette: The Complete Australian Guide To Modern Manners - Marion Von Adlerstein
Charm School: The Modern Girl's Complete Handbook Of Etiquette - Kathy Buchanan

I don't ordinarily review two books at once, especially two by different authors, but these are both reference books in a sense, and both deal with the rules of etiquette in Australia.

 

In my opinion, given my own demographic, I found The Penguin Book Of Etiquette by Marion Von Adlerstein  the superior book.  It covers everything and is the more obvious successor to Emily Post for the Aussies.  I've found this super helpful for those odd occasions when culture shock leaves me scratching my head.

 

Charm School: The Modern Girl's Complete Handbook Of Etiquette by Kathy Buchanan though, would be the better book for older teens, or those leaving home for the first time for university, first job, home, etc.  This is the book for the twentysomethings and it's frank, honest, and slightly amusing in style; much chattier and looser than Von Adlerstein's voice.  Note: This book is specifically aimed at women.

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review 2016-10-18 18:49
Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl
Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl: A Memoir - -Penguin Audio-,Carrie Brownstein,Carrie Brownstein

There are several things I loved about this memoir but nothing quite as much as the way the book opens. She begins with a perfect description of what it's like to be a fan, to be a part of a fandom. As a fan of many things and a bit of a geek in general, I couldn't have worded it better.

I loved the inclusion of the whole section on the ways they were interviewed as they got bigger and how no one could avoid mentioning that they were women and somehow make it about them being women more than being musicians or artists. I enjoyed that she included excerpts, allowing the reader to be annoyed with her but not necessarily admonishing those who had written them either.

I was always a bookish girl and could never relate to music the way that other people did, but I tried. This book made sense of a lot of it. The abandonment to the music and the way the abandonment was desirable, the vulnerability and connection required to create something together. I get the way those things are appealing. I also greatly appreciated the way Brownstein came back around more than once to the fact that so many things about what makes music great are the people that were with you when you experienced it.

I loved the way sexuality was handled in the book, neither glossing over the facts nor dwelling in the details. Sex and sexuality are so personal that I can't imagine laying out these kinds of experiences for the world to hear, and then reading it back to them in your own voice. Still, it's not something to be altogether missed when discussing a life. Relationships were described in their feeling and not as much in actions, which was stunning and beautiful and unusual.

Then there was the music. There was the descriptions of how the music came to be. Each album was different and came from a different place, the songs weren't recited nor were the details laid meticulously out, but we were allowed to get a sense of where they came from. It was like describing the way it feels to be in a birthing room without the gory details of what the mother looks like as she goes through the process.

I listened to the audiobook, which Brownstein read herself in the studio and there was also an interview at the end. As always, I'm appreciative of an author who narrates her own story, particularly in a memoir. I feel like there's more of a connection to be made than when someone else does it. Listening to it, I completely understand how this came to be one of the Our Shared Shelf choices. I missed listening to it with the book club because I had just gotten some books I'd been waiting for and those led right into WIT Month and then September turned into October. I'm just glad for the recommendation. This is not a book I would have thought to read without OSS.

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review 2016-02-06 00:12
Can you say cliche?
Modern Girl's Guide to Friends With Benefits - GINA DRAYER

I have a feeling that I might be in the minority, as quite often when it comes to romance books like this one. And with these kind, I mean your rather cliche, well everything.

I actually liked it too much to DNF but while it had some quite fun and cute moments-the entire thing felt way too tried. It like half the situations were beyond cliche and the other half felt like Drayer is trying way too hard to make this quirky.

I think the writing style is quite good. The plot- well, I am a fan of bestie to lover stories- and this one was a bit meh and way to0 melodramatic.

The characters were.. well ... the guys are all a bit dim r super duche-bags, quite frankly. Except for the two gay guys- they seemed to dole out life advice on a stick instead. The women are all a bit catty. And let me just put it out there I am not a fan of Megan I found her self-centered and totally immature, a totally drama queen and rather manipulative. Half the time I kept thinking, she is supposed to be 30, but behaves like 12... And all those situations? Spoilt and selfish is all I can see.
I did like Peter, except he wasn't the brightest bulb was he? And I honestly don't think men are that stupid. I think it's rather sexist of us women to assume men don't have a clue- like ever... oh wait: except when they are gay, then the ball game changes apparently.

My biggest issue with this however? The sex and the supposed chemistry between Megan and Peter.
There was none. No chemistry. Drayer kept mentioning there was, but I couldn't see it at all.
The smut? It felt generic. Like now we doing this kind of scene- let's start and a go to b then c.
as example:

"Why Peter, I'm getting the distinct impression that you want something,"she teased as he crawled up her body. She giggled and tried to wiggle out from under him, but he caught both her hands.



Peter wasn't sure what she had in mind, but she was an alluring siren. He'd follow her anywhere.


Really? I found Megan's smut talk and behaviour obnoxious. At best.
But mostly the smut felt plotted and overdone.

So not a series for me..
Buuut I still lurve the cover and bestie-to-lover beats insta anyday!


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text 2016-01-12 16:00
Top Ten Tuesday: January 12, 2016
The Argonauts - Maggie Nelson
Modern Romance - Aziz Ansari,Eric Klinenberg
You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine - Alexandra Kleeman
Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl - Carrie Brownstein
Sorcerer to the Crown - Zen Cho
Drawn & Quarterly: Twenty-five Years of Contemporary Cartooning, Comics, and Graphic Novels - Tom Devlin
Step Aside, Pops: A Hark! A Vagrant Collection - Kate Beaton
Shadowshaper - Daniel José Older
Ms. Marvel Vol. 3: Crushed - G. Willow Wilson,Adrian Alphona
Manners and Mutiny (Finishing School) - Gail Carriger

Top 2015 Book Releases I Meant to Get But Didn’t (original concept and this week's topic from The Broke and the Bookish)

 

The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson

 

Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari and Eric Klinenberg

 

You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine by Alexandra Kleeman

 

Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl by Carrie Brownstein

 

Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho

 

Drawn & Quarterly: Twenty-Five Years of Contemporary Cartooning, Comics, and Graphic Novels edited by Tom Devlin

 

Step Aside, Pops! by Kate Beaton

 

Shadowshaper by Daniel Jose Older

 

Ms. Marvel Volume 3: Crushed by G. Willow Wilson, Mark Waid, Takeshi Miyazawa

 

Manners & Mutiny by Gail Carriger

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review 2014-09-20 17:53
"Girl Talk: Unsolicited Advice For Modern Ladies" By: Christie Young is Fresh and Funny
Girl Talk: Unsolicited Advice for Modern Ladies - Christie Young

I received a copy of the actual book from Random House, the publisher, in exchange for an honest review; both here on BookLikes and on Blogging For Books.

 

I have been reading a lot of heavy literary fiction lately, and needed something more fun to read, so when I saw this, I put a request in, and was happily surprised that I got picked. 

 

I liked everything about this book - from the layout and illustrations, to the snarkiness of Christie Young's voice on the page. Let's just say I chortled a lot while reading this book. It's very chortle worthy, to say the least.

 

Finally, to get an idea on how awesome this book actually is, I wanted to quote some of my favorites, so here they are:

 

From Home Office: "Call it a studio, call it an office, just call it something. You'll be working here a while, so get comfortable & get a name - you'll need a place to have business lunches delivered."

 

 

From Tattoo Time: "As much as you love your ink, your parents probably won't. Any time is the worst time to break the news, so get it over with already."

 

 

Last, but certainly not the least:

 

 

From Karaoke: "Refusing to sing karaoke is refusing to be any fun. No one will remember you for singing Paul Simon poorly, but they will remember you trotting your (boring) high-horse into a (not boring) evening. You might make some friends, you might make even more enemies, just make something of yourself on that microphone."

 

I can't wait to share this book with all of my girlfriends and break into spontaneous fits of laughter with them, and if you enjoy the same things, then pick up a copy of this book - stat.

 

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