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review 2017-05-27 11:10
His Last Bow (from The Complete Sherlock Holmes)
The Complete Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle

A quick adventure that take place on the eve of World War I, His Last Bow is not a mystery at all, but something of a spy caper, as Sherlock Holmes brings down a German spy-master.  It's good because it's Holmes and as always he's the master, but it's bittersweet too as the reader knows both what is coming both for England and themselves, as this is one of the last stories we'll ever have.

 

 

I read this as part of the Memorial Day BookLikes-opoly donation to the jail library.  It was 10 pages in length, and although it has a war theme, it still only earns $1.00.

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text 2017-05-22 11:20
22nd May 2017
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle

It is a great thing to start life with a small number of really good books which are your very own.

 

Arthur Conan Doyle

 

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (born May 22, 1859) created the observant and skeptical Sherlock Holmes, but later in life Doyle became interested in the supernatural. He had a falling out with Harry Houdini when he refused to believe that the magician's illusions were not real.

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text 2017-05-01 08:10
April Reading in Review
Norse Mythology - Neil Gaiman
Fast Women - Jennifer Crusie
The Haunted Grange Of Goresthorpe - Arthur Conan Doyle
Her Brilliant Career: Ten Extraordinary Women of the Fifties - Rachel Cooke
Roger, Sausage and Whippet - Christopher Moore
The Delight of Being Ordinary: A Road Trip with the Pope and the Dalai Lama - Roland Merullo
The Card Catalog: Books, Cards, and Literary Treasures - Carla D. Hayden,Library of Congress

I had 2 weeks of school holidays and Easter weekend in my favour this month, but unforeseen events put a hitch in my gitalong at the end of April.  Still I had a solid reading month and I'm not complaining at all.

 

28 books  / 7,511 pages read.

 

2 Five-star reads this time, although one of them is a re-read.  Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman  was so good in audio, I went out and bought a print copy for my shelves.  Fast Women by Jennifer Crusie is one of my all-time favourites and it never gets tired.

 

3 out of the 5 4.5 star reads were non-fiction, but one of those, Roger, Sausage and Whippet by Christopher Moore, a glossary of WWI terms, snuck a narrative in that was riveting, if only in its unexpectedness.  Her Brilliant Career: Ten Extraordinary Women of the Fifties by Rachel Cooke was great too, although as I said in my review, I'm not sure some of these women could be called roll models.  The Card Catalog: Books, Cards, and Literary Treasures by Carla D. Hayden, Library of Congress is one of those books you either appreciate, or you don't.  Obviously, I did.  

 

The Delight of Being Ordinary: A Road Trip with the Pope and the Dalai Lama by Roland Merullo is the fictional equivalent of The Card Catalog - it's not going to be for everyone, but I thoroughly enjoyed it and it left me chewing over more than a few things.

 

But by far, the breakout star of my month was The Haunted Grange Of Goresthorpe by Arthur Conan Doyle, a short ghost story that is believed to be one of the first Doyle wrote but was never published in his lifetime.  The only reason I dinged it 1/2 star is because the introduction is 30 pages longer than the story itself, and spends a lot of those 30 pages excusing the weakness of the story itself, which, by the way, isn't weak at all; it's a ripper of a ghost story.  If you like Doyle or ghosts, or both, you should find this story and read it.  

 

May your May be full of extraordinary reads.  And I don't mean maybe.  (sorry.)

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text 2017-04-29 09:08
Book Haul
Conan Doyle: Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes. - Andrew Lycett
The Penguin Book Of Etiquette: The Complete Australian Guide To Modern Manners - Marion Von Adlerstein
The Book of Killowen - Erin Hart
The Library of Shadows - Mikkel Birkegaard
I Work at a Public Library: A Collection of Crazy Stories from the Stacks - Gina Sheridan
Blade Bound - Chloe Neill
Dangerous To Know - Renee Patrick
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Arthur Conan Doyle

It's not all decomp and deodorisers here at la casa de la rata muerta; I hit up my local FOTL semi-annual book sale yesterday and came away with a few possible gems.

 

 

(Three of the above actually came this week in the mail; 2 new, 1 used.)

 

Conan Doyle: Man Who Created Sherlock Holmes. I know nothing about this biography and can only hope it's enjoyable.

  

The Penguin Book Of Etiquette: The Complete Australian Guide To Modern Manners This one is likely going to tell me it's rude to post gross disgusting stories about dead animals in your walls, but better late than never.

 

The Book of Killowen I was sucked in by the story about a book.  Of course.  Seems to be a mid-series entry, so hopefully it'll work as a stand-alone. 

 

The Library of Shadows I think I've heard about this one before - might have even looked at it in a bookshop, but again, it's about books so of course I bought it.

 

I Work at a Public Library: A Collection of Crazy Stories from the Stacks 

 

Blade Bound The last in the Chicagoland series.  *sniffle*

 

Dangerous To Know The first one was excellent, I hope this one lives up to expectations.

 

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes I had a suspicion I already had a copy, but just in case... (of course I did).

 

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review 2017-04-03 22:42
The Haunted Grange of Goresthorpe
The Haunted Grange Of Goresthorpe - Arthur Conan Doyle

Many thanks to Murder by Death for pointing me to this early short story by Arthur Conan Doyle written around 1870. 

 

Even if ACD experts don't think highly of this short ghost story, I enjoyed reading it. I was thrilled by it. And, as I read it right before bed, I was a little haunted by it.

 

In my book, this is a great story.

 

It's almost sad that people are likely to hear of it only because it was only re-discovered in 2000, not because it is a fun story and shows another side to ACD that is not connected with Sherlock Holmes.

 

If you're intrigued, you can find the story here.

 

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