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url 2018-11-16 10:06
AoL books and courses Freebie Fridays FREE TODAY
Art of 4 Elements - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Mindful Eating with Delicious Raw Vegan Recipes - Nataša Pantović Nuit
A-Ma Alchemy of Love - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Chanting Mantras with Best Chords - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Conscious Parenting: Mindful Living Course for Parents - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Tree of Life - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Mindful Being - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Conscious Creativity: Mindfulness Meditations - Nataša Pantović Nuit
Spiritual Symbols: With their Meanings (Alchemy of love mindfulness training) (Volume 8) - Nataša Pantović Nuit

AoL Mindfulness training books

Free 2 download Today: AoL Mindfulness training books, Spiritual fiction and nonfiction.

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Source: www.artof4elements.com/entry/196/mindfulness-training-books-promotions
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url 2018-11-07 16:42
Podcast #123 is up!
Yuan Shikai: A Reappraisal - Patrick Fuliang Shan

My latest podcast is up on the New Books Network website! In it, I interview Patrick Fuliang Shan about his new biography of Yuan Shikai, the imperial official who became president of China before embarking on a failed bid to become emperor. Enjoy!

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text 2018-09-05 07:40
Buy Best Digital Dual Band Mobile Radio Online

This variant of the digital mobile radio is like the RD-5R, it bolsters both Time Slot 1 and Time Slot 2. Good with standard receiving wires, speaker mics and that's just the beginning, Baofeng by and by conveys additional incentive to the Amateur Ham Radio administrator. Good with both Digital DMR and existing Analog repeaters the Baofeng DM-5R offers adaptability of sliding into the advanced world while holding your simple similarity. These are honest to goodness Baofeng radios, provided by China. Digital dual band mobile radio is the best choice that you can ever have.

While this radio uses another Programming Cable, Digital will incorporate one free with each request. Extra links are likewise accessible.

 

digital dual band mobile radio

 

Digital Radio

 

TURBO Compatible (Tier I and II)
Completely clear Call Quality
Double Band
VHF/UHF 136-174/400-520Mhz
2000mAH High Capacity Battery
High Power/Low power (5W/1W)
128 channels
21CM Dual Band Antenna
Auto control sparing capacity, Super-Long Standby
14 hours use time, up to 30 long periods of backup time
Crisis Alarm
Electric lamp
Individual/Group/All Call
CTCSS/DCS
Perfect with Digital DMR And Analog FM Systems

 

Not exclusively are the best small rugged smartphone, cash can purchase water and residue confirmation, they additionally come in stun safe cases, which makes them perfect for working outside. In case you're an enthusiast of open air exercises, for example, climbing, paddling, and climbing, at that point these splendid rough cell phones are an awesome decision too.

 

Small rugged smartphone

 

The best tough cell phones will have experienced stringent IP68 tests to guarantee that they meet military-determined norms for assurance against vibration, stun, outrageous temperatures, residue, and water (though in controlled situations).

 

The best rough cell phones will likewise offer additional highlights to separate themselves from whatever remains of the opposition: some have infrared camera usefulness, others have sound level meters and even VOC (unpredictable natural compound) identifiers.

 

For more information about our products and services, visit our website: https://boxchiptt.com

 

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text 2018-05-28 06:07
No Gift Can Equal The Joy They Give Us

That is the truth. No parent can ever give a gift that will equal the joy children give them. No pleasure can equal the pleasure of watching your children grow up. You laugh with them and you cry secretly when they cry. You suffer the pain when they fall down. The joy of seeing their every action has no parallels. When they give you so much of happiness there is no surprise that parents want to give their children the best gift in life.

 

What better way to gift a child than giving him all the good fortune for his life. This is what Chinese parents do when they name their children. They get the master to look at all the elements and select names that will bestow all the good fortunes for the child. The Baby Chinese naming ceremony is aimed at giving the child the luckiest name that will always provide the child with good luck all through its life. At Huatsing Baby Souvenir, we have the expert master who can give your child the most blessed name.

 

 

He will study the baby’s five elements and give the names that will be best for it. Our master knows the traditional way of giving the luckiest names for the child. Our master will provide you with 110 names out of which he will explain in detail about the most suitable ten names. There will be the full explanation for the names including the meaning of the strokes. Out of these ten names, you can select the name you like most. We will then print the book of naming with the full explanation of the name you have selected. You can gift this to the child when he or she grows up.

 

Another tradition that is followed, is the making of the Taimaobi with the child’s first cut hair. We have expert barbers who will do the first haircut for your baby as per your wish. Our highly skilled craftsmen will then make the calligraphy brush with this first hairs. At our Taimaobi centre, you can get the most exquisitely carved calligraphy brushes that you can present your child when it goes to study.

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review 2018-04-19 20:51
Little Soldiers by Lenora Chu
Little Soldiers: An American Boy, a Chinese School, and the Global Race to Achieve - Lenora Chu

This is a really interesting book that offers a firsthand view of the Chinese school system from a mostly-American perspective. Lenora Chu is a daughter of Chinese immigrants who was raised in the U.S., her husband a white American who volunteered in China with the Peace Corps. After moving to Shanghai for work, they enroll their son in a prestigious Chinese preschool. Concerning incidents at the school spark the author’s journey to learn more about the Chinese school system: she observes classrooms in China and the U.S., talks to experts, and gets to know Chinese high schoolers and parents.

So the book is part memoir, part nonfiction. From an American perspective it’s a fascinating comparison; so much of what I tend to view as going wrong in current American ideas of education and child-rearing seems to be heightened in China, from overscheduled kids (in China it’s usually tutoring or extracurricular classes rather than swimming, gymnastics etc.), to an unwillingness to let kids play freely and explore because they might hurt themselves (other parents judge Chu for letting her son run around the living room jumping off chairs, etc., and the school states that kids aren’t allowed to talk during lunch because they might choke), to a heavy emphasis on testing. Regarding that last one, pressure for the high school and college entrance exams in China is so intense that in one town a crackdown on cheating resulted in parents and students rioting.

Which actually leads to one of the positive features of the Chinese system: Chinese families tend to treat academics the way American families treat sports, to the point of huge crowds of people gathering outside exam sites to see their kids off and shout well-wishes. While Americans face a social penalty for being “nerds” and tend to view academic success as a matter of inborn talent (so if you don’t have it, why bother to try), the Chinese have valued brains – and judged people by their test scores – for centuries, and believe that success is largely a matter of effort. They aren’t afraid to demand work from kids or to ask them to memorize. This is especially noticeable in math: while American schools tend to wrap up simple math in verbally complicated “word problems” in an attempt to make the work “relevant” to kids who won’t have a professional job for a decade or more anyway, Chinese schools forge ahead and have young kids doing more advanced problems. This is helped by the fact that Chinese teachers specialize in their subject matter from the first grade, while American elementary school teachers are generalists (who by and large don’t like math and weren’t good at it themselves). Of course it’s also helped by Chinese schools’ making no attempt to integrate kids with special needs into regular classrooms, which American schools must do.

It’s evident from Chu’s writing that all of these issues are complicated: each school system has its advantages and disadvantages, but many of the advantages come with their own negatives or are bound up with the culture and therefore hard to replicate, while the disadvantages can also have silver linings. And of course no huge country has a uniform school system: just as the U.S. has both great and failing schools, China too has huge disparities, with many rural schools being shafted.

There's a lot in the book that I haven't even discussed here: politics in the classroom, the social position of teachers, the encouragement of creativity or lack thereof, and how all this affects students in the long run. But the book isn’t a treatise. Chu keeps it lively and interesting with accounts of her own family’s experiences, and with a clear, journalistic writing style. I imagine some readers might criticize her parenting decisions – at times it felt as if she were trying to claim a high-minded rationale for a choice of school that ultimately came down to cost, while she and her husband seemed willing to accept (if unhappily) a certain amount of what many Americans would consider abusive treatment of preschool kids (such as forcefeeding, or threatening to call the police on them when they misbehave) in the interests of having a disciplined and well-behaved child. But for the American reader it’s a fascinating window into a very different school system, and into Chinese culture as a whole. It is balanced and thoughtful, and the author comes across as open-minded, curious and willing to adapt rather than pushing an agenda. I do wish it had endnotes rather than a chapter-by-chapter bibliography, for readers to follow up and learn more. But I learned a lot from this book, enjoyed reading it, and would recommend it.

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