logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: E.-Llewellyn
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-12-16 04:52
The Belles - audiobook
The Belles - Dhonielle Clayton,Rosie Llewellyn-Jones

Audience: Young Adult

 

We all turned sixteen today, and for any normal girl that would mean raspberry and lemon macarons and tiny pastel blimps and pink champagne and card games. Maybe even a teacup elephant.

- opening lines

 

Camellia Beauregard is a Belle. In this world, Belles control Beauty and Beauty is a commodity. People are born gray and will pay anything to be transformed. The society is fixated on Beauty - there are even rules to prevent people from going to extremes. For example, a Belle cannot make your proportions so outrageous that they don't look like the natural human form. Camellia (and the other Belles) wants to be the favorite and live in the palace. But, in this world, nothing is as it seems and danger and betrayal are everywhere.

 

So, I think this book was trying to make a statement about how much our society reveres beauty. And how dangerous this could be when taken to the extreme. There are many issues tackled in this book including gender equality, male privilege, the way woman warp their bodies to be "perfect," and the idea that beauty is not just what we see on the outside. It does a good job of raising the issues without seeming preachy.

 

Camellia is fixated on being the Favorite and being the best and she can't handle the idea of failing. But she is naive and doesn't see what is happening around her - the deception and danger. I found the evil character to be very obvious and couldn't believe that Camellia wouldn't see right through her. She often walked right into a trap that a blind person would have seen coming.

 

The world is interesting with the teacup size elephants, giraffes, and dragons. But some of the descriptions are a bit much and I found it distracting. When describing a scene or a place, the author used a lot of imagery and flowery language - too much really. It stood out to me and it shouldn't - I should be able to picture the scene in my head without thinking about how many similes or metaphors the author is using.

 

The audio was very well done. I enjoyed the narrator's accent. I read the first couple of pages on the Amazon preview and I was glad I listened to the audio. There are many words that are hard to figure out how to pronounce. Not having to think about that allowed me to enjoy the story more. 

 

I did enjoy the story and when the ending was more than a bit of a cliffhanger, I was looking for the next book in the series. It doesn't come out until some time next year. If it had been available when I finished this book I probably would have read it, but I don't know if I will still be as interested when it finally comes out.

 

I borrowed the audio from my local library. The book is a Florida Teens Read program nominated book for 2018-19.

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-07-31 13:19
July Wrap-up
Conrad Monk and the Great Heathen Army - Edoardo Albert
Kitchen Witchcraft - Rachel Patterson
Haunted Castles of England - J.G. Montgomery
Ghost Boy - Stafford Betty
Llewellyn's Little Book of Life Between Lives - The Newton Institute
Woven in Wire - Sarah Thompson
Unnatural Creatures - Maria Dahvana Headley,Neil Gaiman
Herbal Formularies for Health Professionals, Volume 2 - Jill Stansbury
Knitting Ganseys, Revised and Updated: Techniques and Patterns for Traditional Sweaters - Beth Brown-Reinsel

9 books this month, which is good for me. 6 of them were non-fiction which don't take as long (usually) and 8 of the 9 were from Netgalley.

 

I do have another 7 partial reads on the go which I hope to at least mostly finish by end of August and one more book from Netgalley that definitely won't fit into Halloween Bingo, so I'll start it next.

 

I have 5 books from Netgalley that I haven't started yet that just might fit a Halloween Bingo category, so I'll wait to see what they are before I start any of those! Unless I actually finish all of my current reads, in which case there is one less likely than the others.

 

I'm still working my way through the massive pile of samples. Hopefully choosing books for Bingo will lead to eliminating a few of those! There are a couple in my Horror folder that I hope to include in Bingo, not least of all the third book of the Jason Crane series. It's becoming a tradition to read one of these each year! Though I think this is the last of the series.

 

Of this month's books, the stand out was Conrad Monk and the Great Heathen Army, which I reviewed on my last post before this one. It earned a rare 5 star rating from me.

 

Two of the non-fiction books I read will remain among my reference books; Haunted Castles in England and Herbal Formularies for Health Professionals. The Jewellery and knitting books will also get some future mileage and hopefully I'll find time to try a few projects.

 

So not a bad month, but I definitely need some more good fiction reads in the upcoming months.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-18 10:37
Llewellyn's Little Book of Life Between Lives
Llewellyn's Little Book of Life Between Lives - The Newton Institute

The Newton Institute

 

I have to admit that the first few chapters of this put far too much emphasis on belief. Maybe it's because I've read other books on this subject matter but I feel that someone who takes the trouble to read about it has already become at least open to belief and the 'exercises' in the first few chapters seem redundant and amount to quiet contemplation of the sort of things that will have already led the reader to pick up the book, like being attracted to certain places or eras.

 

As the chapters went on I had hoped for something more, but the 'exercises' continued to be more suggestions for things to think about rather than guidance for self-hypnosis as I've seen in other books. There were references for going between lives but no real instruction about how to accomplish that.

 

All of the 'evidence' presented was completely subjective accounts. No examples of evidence that got confirmed by historical records or surviving relatives of the previous person as I've seen elsewhere.

 

When it began talking about a council of elders, the book pretty much lost me and it went further into new age territory after that. To be quite honest, if this were the only book I had ever read on reincarnation, I would be writing the topic off as total fantasy. The writing itself is good, but there is nothing to convince the questioning reader that any of it is any more than imagination.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-26 01:35
The Wonder That Was India
The Wonder That Was India - Arthur Llewellyn Basham

Even though Indian civilization has interacted with other civilizations over the millennia, there is still a mystery and allure about its history, culture, and religions that still fascinates.  The Wonder That Was India by A.L. Basham is a classic interpretation of Indian culture that for over 60 years has been an introduction to the unique culture that covered a subcontinent up until the arrival of the Muslims.

 

Basham ordered the book by discipline first with history—both pre-recorded and recorded—followed by government, society, everyday life, religion, the arts, and finally language and literature.  This allowed for a generally reader friendly book as Basham covered the history of the subcontinent and then used that background to show the societal and cultural developments.  Throughout the book are numerous illustrations, drawings, and maps that showed the richness of the civilization.  However, being over 60 years old some of the information is out of date and that is not all of the imperfections that future readers should know about.  Basham’s writing style is somewhat dry in places and reading becomes as slog.  And the illustrations while being spread throughout the book are not easy to find when referenced in the text.

 

However, even with this downside The Wonder That Was India is still a great introduction into Indian history.  A.L. Basham’s enthusiasm is very evident as well as his expertise on the subject.  I definitely recommend this book for dedicated history readers, but issue a word of warning to general readers.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-10-31 23:24
My October 2017
Miraculous - Die geheime Superheldin - Barbara Neeb,Katharina Schmidt
Just One of the Boys - Leah and Kate Rooper
Approximately Yours (North Pole, Minnesota) - Julie Hammerle
Miraculous - Der dunkle Doppelgänger - Barbara Neeb,Katharina Schmidt
Blutzeuge - Tess Gerritsen
Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe - Stacy King,Edgar Allan Poe
Der magische Faden - Tom Llewellyn,Nina Dulleck,Ilse Layer
Süßer Ruf des Todes (Reihenfolge der Eve Dallas-Krimis, Band 29) - J.D. Robb,Uta Hege
Miraculous - Die geheime Superheldin - 4 stars
Just One of the Boys - 4 stars
Approximately Yours - 5 stars
Miraculous - Der dunkle Doppelgänger - 5 stars
Blutzeuge - 5 stars
Manga Classics: The Stories of Edgar Allan Poe - 4 stars
Der magische Faden - 4 stars
Süßer Ruf des Todes - 5 stars

 

Favorite book(s) of the month: Just One of the Boys, Approximately Yours, Blutzeuge, Süßer Ruf des Todes

 

Books started this month but haven't finished yet: Elias & Laia - Die Herrschaft der Masken, Der Fledermausmann, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

 

So this month, I decided to just stop being an adult and completely dive into my books. Real life just was way too much these last few months, I needed that mental break. So I just read all the books. All of them. This is an insane number for me. Also, the quality, I seriously enjoyed all these books.


(I'm doing this wrap up super early. Look at me, having my shit together for once!!!)

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?