logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Fantasy-by-Women-Authors
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-09-06 09:47
Fantastically Medieval
Plague Land - S. D. Sykes

Set in London, 1350, two years after the start of the bubonic plague in that city.

 

Not for the squeamish. The opening scene is pretty gruesome and had me muttering about superstition and stupidity.

 

In a wonderfully medieval tone, a first person account begins, told by a Lord of the manor, far too young. With several of the local authorities dead of plague, responsibility is brought to his door when a dead girl is found in the woods.

 

As a younger son who is only Lord because his older brothers fell victim to the plague, Oswald is unprepared for his role but rises to the challenge with admirable self-discipline and intelligence. Plots and intrigue make it necessary for him to learn the ways of land-grabbing Lords fast, and a superstitious priest complicates his every move.

 

I loved the writing in this. Despite the stress and some gory scenes, it's wonderfully medieval and at times even poetic in well written prose. Highly recommended for anyone who enjoys Historical Fiction or Fantasy.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-07-15 10:45
Perfect finish to the series
Power of the Dance - Jaq D. Hawkins

All the books in this trilogy are supposed to be stand alone, but I think this one needs to be read with background information from at least one of the other two. It occurs a generation after Demoniac Dance and the children in that story have grown up, some even having children of their own.

 

It's hard to say much about this story without giving spoilers for the previous one, so if you haven't read Demoniac Dance, you might want to read that one first before finishing this review.

 

Khemael, the main character, is mostly human looking in appearance, except for his large, dragon-like wings. If he allows a human to see him, there's an equal chance of being mistaken for an angel or a demon. He enjoys flying freely and this causes problems, because of course goblins are supposed to stay out of sight and one of the characters from the previous novel who is a dragon also breaks a few rules by going out to fly.

 

The ability comes in handy when a tribe of wild men move towards the old city and present a danger to the human settlements there. Old enemies have to cooperate once again against a common foe.

 

This had some very dramatic scenes in it and wrapped the series as a whole up very neatly. It's definitely one of my favourite series and I highly recommend it to any Fantasy readers. If you read on Kindle, the complete series in one volume periodically goes on sale very cheaply and it's just called The Goblin Trilogy so keep an eye out for it.

 

I'm partly sad that the ending worked so well because that means no more books in this world, unless the author does a parallel timeline series like Anne McCaffrey and others have done.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-07-15 10:37
End of the series for me
Black Powder War - Naomi Novik

I loved that this story started right after the previous one ended. Temeraire and his crew are still in China, but both weather and a problem with the ship are preventing their return to England, when they get an urgent missive to transport some eggs. A dragon can fly distances over land, but there are dangers. Urgency and Temeriere's enthusiasm drive Captain Laurence to try that route.

 

Much of the story takes place in Turkey this time so we get a different cultural flavour. I had mixed feelings about the story overall. It was different from their previous adventures, yet in many ways it seemed samey. I actually put the book aside for a while and came back to it, determined to finish though finding it a slog. I think this is the end of the series for me, though there are six more books. It's just not holding my attention anymore.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-07-11 09:47
The Forgotten Beasts of Eld
The Forgotten Beasts of Eld - Patricia A. McKillip

by Patricia McKillip

 

Old style medieval Fantasy with wizards and dragons, magical animals and a child who must be hidden.

 

The narrative reeks of fairy tale, yet doesn't come over as a children's story. Although it has the usual patriarchal society, the main character is a strong female.

 

I can see why Patricia McKillip is so well-known and highly regarded. How I've missed reading her before is a mystery to me! She weaves magic and drama together artfully so that the impossible feels perfectly believable and I found it easy to care about the characters, especially Tam.

 

She addresses hard choices and issues of human nature in a way that engages the reader in the lives of the main characters rather than preaching. Though her style is definitely for my fairytale-like Fantasy moods, I will definitely be reading more of her work. This was apparently one of her early ones, now re-issued.

 

There were some surprises and a lot of conflict near the end that I couldn't see a way out of, so kept me interested and gave me a resolution that I didn't see coming. Highly recommended for Fantasy fans.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-05-12 09:48
Interesting new concept in Fantasy
Ephraim's Curious Device (Clockpunk Wizard, #2) - Lita Burke

Imagine Fantasy wizards selling magical services from an airship that can allow them to travel. It's one of those concepts that a Fantasy writer naturally wishes they had thought of first!

 

This story is a new adventure for characters that we met in The Forever Boy, but stands well on its own for those who have not read the other story. Still I would recommend reading Forever Boy as it is a wonderful introduction to these characters and gives the reader the background of Furgo.

 

The story is rather fun and has an interesting and unique approach to magical curses. Despite some trepidation of one rather long name - Hissalumieon - the story flows well and keeps the reader interested. The rules of magic are well explained within the context of the story and used to good effect in the plot as it unfolds.

 

This was one of the best Fantasy novels I've read in a while.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?