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text 2018-09-07 10:06
Reading progress update: I've read 109 out of 454 pages.
The Raven Boys - Maggie Stiefvater

Third read of this wonderful book. This time I'm listening to it in audio then marking the pages in my paperback. (Reading and listening) and it may be one I've the best audio books I've ever heard. It's really atmospheric and the narration is amazing. The Southern accents are awesome.

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text 2018-05-11 00:02
Reading progress update: I've read 99%.
Howards End - E.M. Forster

“Meg, is or isn't he ill? I can't make out.”

“Not ill. Eternally tired. He has worked very hard all his life, and noticed nothing. Those are the people who collapse when they do notice a thing.”

 

Finally, Henry is close to making a connection.

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text 2018-05-10 23:08
Reading progress update: I've read 83%.
Howards End - E.M. Forster

Henry began to grow serious. Ill-health was to him something perfectly definite. Generally well himself, he could not realize that we sink to it by slow gradations. The sick had no rights; they were outside the pale; one could lie to them remorselessly. When his first wife was seized, he had promised to take her down into Hertfordshire, but meanwhile arranged with a nursing-home instead. Helen, too, was ill. And the plan that he sketched out for her capture, clever and well-meaning as it was, drew its ethics from the wolf-pack.

Henry Wilcox could give Everard Wemyss (see here and here) a run for his money, and because we know that Wemyss was based on a real person (von Arnim's husband and also Bertrand Russel's older brother) we also know that these people existed. And scarier still, they still exist.

 

Why Meg? WHY?!?!?

 

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text 2018-05-10 21:20
Reading progress update: I've read 67%.
Howards End - E.M. Forster

It was the reward of her tact and devotion through the day. Now she understood why some women prefer influence to rights. Mrs. Plynlimmon, when condemning suffragettes, had said: “The woman who can't influence her husband to vote the way she wants ought to be ashamed of herself.” Margaret had winced, but she was influencing Henry now, and though pleased at her little victory, she knew that she had won it by the methods of the harem.

...I'm still puzzled by what might have possessed Margaret. I mean, I get it, but for crying out loud... Henry?!

 

Margaret certainly is the most complex character in this one.

 

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text 2018-05-09 21:49
Reading progress update: I've read 41%.
Howards End - E.M. Forster

Financial institutions haven't changed much, have they?

To him, as to the British public, the Porphyrion was the Porphyrion of the advertisement—a giant, in the classical style, but draped sufficiently, who held in one hand a burning torch, and pointed with the other to St. Paul's and Windsor Castle. A large sum of money was inscribed below, and you drew your own conclusions. This giant caused Leonard to do arithmetic and write letters, to explain the regulations to new clients, and re-explain them to old ones. A giant was of an impulsive morality—one knew that much. He would pay for Mrs. Munt's hearth-rug with ostentatious haste, a large claim he would repudiate quietly, and fight court by court. But his true fighting weight, his antecedents, his amours with other members of the commercial Pantheon—all these were as uncertain to ordinary mortals as were the escapades of Zeus. While the gods are powerful, we learn little about them. It is only in the days of their decadence that a strong light beats into heaven.

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