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review 2017-11-22 23:04
Tackling real-life teen issues...with the power of music.
This Song Will Save Your Life (Audio) - Leila Sales

 

Book Title:  This Song Will Save Your Life

Author:  Leila Sales

Narration:  Rebecca Lowman

Genre:  YA | Realistic Fiction

Setting:  Glendale, Rhode Island

Source:  Audiobook (Library)

 

 

 

Add to Goodreads

 

 

 

 

 

Plot:  4.5/5

Main Characters:  5/5

Secondary Characters:  4.2/5

The Feels:  5+/5

Pacing:  5/5

Addictiveness:  4.5/5

Theme or Tone:  5+/5

Flow (Writing Style):  5/5

Backdrop (World Building):  4/5

Originality:  5/5

Book Cover:  5/5

Narration:  5/5

Ending:  5/5  Cliffhanger:  Nope.

Steam Factor 0-5:  2.5

Total:  4.5/5 STARS - GRADE=A-

 

 

 

A feel-good storyline paired with excellent narration and I couldn't help but love this.  A coming-of-age story about trying to fit in and wanting to just give up on it ever happening.  But…the thing is when you're not looking for something…that's when you'll find it.  

 

Does the storyline always seem plausible…not all the time, but it doesn't really matter.  It's not really the point of the story.  (I mean, seriously, I would never want my 16-year-old daughter walking the streets at night by herself, and I don't care how safe the town is supposed to be.)  But hey, I really liked Elise, her quirky family and most of her adorable friends.  Along with the narrator, they all made this a rather enjoyable listen on Audio.

 

Will I read more from this Author?  Yes.

 

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review 2017-11-21 23:53
ARC Review: The Secret Of The Sheikh's Betrothed by Felicitas Ivey
The Secret of the Sheikh’s Betrothed (Dreamspun Desires Book 46) - Felicitas Ivey

First off, I had no issues whatsoever with the writing style of this author, or the writing itself. The story flowed along well, and I wasn't bored at all while reading. That is one of the two reasons this book got two stars instead of just one.

The other one is that I was super enraged for most of the book at the treatment Ikraam had to endure at the hands of her sister.

Moving on.... 

After I mulled it over for a while, I realized I had massive issues with some of the characters, the plot, and the setting, as well as the social aspects of this book. The messages within are really problematic for me. 

I mentioned in my status update when I finished the book that "this was different". It sure is. The book is set in a country in the Middle East, where sheikhs and Bedouin tribes are still aplenty. Goat herding is mentioned. Grazing grounds. Filthy rich sheikhs. Camels. Donkeys. Lots of goats. Women are second class, at best, required to hide their faces and their bodies in hijabs, niqabs and veils. 

The basic premise is that rich billionaire sheikh Fathi, who's secretly gay, has been told by his grandfather that he's been betrothed to a Bedouin girl named Ikraam, sight unseen, before the girl was even born, due to some debt the grandfather owed to the girl's father many many years ago.

That's basically believable, right? 

The rest of this? Not so much. 

Ikraam is actually not a girl. Ikraam is a young man who was born to the 2nd wife of a Bedouin tribe chief/leader who thus far only fathered girls. He's been raised as a girl in a large harem because his oldest sister didn't want him to be the heir and remove her from her position of power after their father died. She basically forced Ikraam's mother, and then Ikraam as he grew up, to keep his gender a secret and raise him as female. This was continued after the mother died. The oldest sister married a weak man who became the new tribe leader, but it's really been her in charge. She then set out to marry off all her sisters to other tribes so she could be HBIC. 

I had some issues right there. Not only is this plot point unrealistic, but even if it were believable, the psychological repercussions of Ikraam being raised as a female, and eventually realizing he's not female, are never even addressed. Can you imagine being raised this way? And noticing at some point that, hey, I have a penis, and, hey, the others girls do not? And, hey, I could be killed at any time if someone finds out? And, hey, my oldest sister abuses me daily and I have absolutely no way out of this situation other than death? Wouldn't YOU have some serious psychological issues? Can you imagine how fucked up that is? The suffering? The constant fear? Knowing you will die on your wedding night? Feeling that you have to go along with this plan so you can possibly save your niece from a fate worse than death? 

Additionally, Ikraam has been raised without ever learning to read, without knowing anything about the modern world (which I guess is expected when one grows up in a tent in the desert, weaving cloth and hiding underneath a niqab). And yet, this is never addressed even when Ikraam marries Fathi. The difference between Fathi, who was raised with money and educated in the US, and the poor Bedouin woman/man, who's never even been to a city, who's never read a book, who has no idea how the world works outside of goat farming and weaving cloth and hiding behind a veil - how could they possibly be compatible? And to top this off, when the secret does come out, Ikraam suggests living as a female in public, and as a male in the privacy of their bedroom, and NO ONE questions the feasibility of this and its possible repercussions. Fathi thinks it's a great idea. Is Ikraam identifying as gender-queer, made so by how he was raised? Are we supposed to believe that gender identity is thus nurture instead of nature? What message is the author sending here? 

We are introduced to Fathi and his twin brother early on. Fathi has a secretary whose only apparent purpose was to be a contrast to Ikraam as this secretary is educated and modernized, but then used only to be shamed and ridiculed for her aspirations. There's a scene at the very end that had me cringe in second-hand embarrassment that the way this particular scene played out made it past the editor. What was that, even? This is a young, modern, educated woman, someone who did a good job in the position for which she was hired, and yet, she's shamed for being interested in her boss, and the uneducated, unworldly, MALE-pretending-to-be-female Ikraam is held up as a "better" example of being female than this young woman, going so far as showing up on the arm of his new husband, dressed in traditional FEMALE finery and given an opportunity to announce to the secretary that her boss is now married and she needs to take a hike. How did this make it past the editor? What message is this sending to the reader? Readers who are primarily women? 

Don't get me started on Ikraam's oldest sister and the mother of his niece. The woman was pure evil but basically gets away with it. Not only is she perfectly willing to let Ikraam die for her subterfuge, which his husband would then obviously discover, but she's also willing to get rid of her own daughter by attempting to marry her off to a disgusting and violent man at least twice her age, who will likely break not only her spirit but also her body. Evil sister/mother don't care. And even when all of these things come out, she's not punished for her behavior. Ikraam is safe, and so is his niece, but the evil sister never gets a real punishment for not only the deception but also the cruelty and suffering she inflicted. 

Fathi is secretly gay, as I mentioned. His grandfather, described as a very traditional and old-fashioned man set in his ways, then doesn't even really blink when a) Fathi admits to being gay, and b) Ikraam's secret is revealed, and c) they want to get married anyway. Say WHAT? You're trying to tell me that an old man from the Middle East doesn't care that his heir is gay? Embraces it? Is fine with the Bedouin girl being really a man? And you explain it away by stating that he's not super religious and THAT'S IT?? I'm sorry, but I didn't buy what the author was trying to sell here. 

The secondary men in this book, namely the tribe leader and the niece's potential groom, are either weak or evil. Both were one-dimensional characters and used to provide a specific plot point or two, then discarded. 

I usually like the titles in this very tropey series, but this was a complete miss for me. The gender identity issue could have been handled in a much healthier way here, and I would have expected more conflict and pushback from the grandfather based on his portrayal. I would have liked to see some psychological help for Ikraam, and some education as well. 

This book didn't work for me. YMMV.


** I received a free copy of this book from its publisher. A review was not promised in return. **

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review 2017-11-21 21:47
Sometimes a book just isn't what you need at that moment...and maybe this is a case of "It's not you, it's me"...
The Wife Between Us - Greer Hendricks,Sarah Pekkanen

Book Title:  The Wife Between Us

Author:  Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen

Genre:  Mystery | Thriller

Publisher:  St. Martin's Press

Setting:  New York City & Suburbs

Source I received an ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

 

 

 

⇝Add to Goodreads⇜

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plot:  4/5

Main Characters:  4/5

Secondary Characters:  4/5

The Feels:  3/5

Pacing:  3.8/5

Addictiveness: 2/5

Theme or Tone:  3.5/5

Flow (Writing Style):  4/5

Backdrop (World Building):  4.5/5

Originality:  5/5

Book Cover:  4.5/5

Ending:  4.2/5  Cliffhanger:  nope

Steam Factor 0-5:  3

Total:  3.7/5 STARS - GRADE=B

 

 

 

I don't know what it was about this that would not let me stay interested in this.  It seems to have everything you would want in a Mystery/Thriller, including several 5-star reviews, and yet, I just couldn't seem to care enough about it.  It just seemed to have the depressing feel to it and I found myself not wanting to read it.  So…it took me a while to finish it…

 

But really…

 

The Wife Between Us is a haunting story with a cleverly crafted plot and twists you won't see coming.  Overall, you probably shouldn't let my feelings on it sway you into not reading it because plenty of readers loved it.

 

 

Will I read more from this Author?  I don't know, maybe not…maybe yes.

 

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review 2017-11-21 21:23
With the Virtue Duo you get an unadulterated make-no-apologies straight-up love triangle.
Sweetest Venom (The Virtue Series) (Volume 2) - Mia Asher

Book Title:  Sweetest Venom
Author:  Mia Asher
Narration:  Lucy Rivers & Jeremy York
Series:  Virtue #2
Genre:  Erotica | Romance
Setting:  New York
Source:  Audiobook (Library)
 
 
 
⇝Add to Goodreads⇜

 
 
 
 

 
 
Plot:  3.2/5
Main Characters:  3.5/5
Secondary Characters:  3.5/5
The Feels:  3/5
Pacing:  4/5
Addictiveness:  3.5/5
Theme or Tone:  2.8/5
Flow (Writing Style):  4/5
Backdrop (World Building):  4/5
Book Cover:  4/5
Narration:  4.5/5
Ending:  3.7/5  Cliffhanger:  Nope.
Steam Factor 0-5:  5+
Total:  3.7/5 STARS - GRADE=B

 


 
 

 
I went into this knowing it would have too much explicit sex for my liking…and so I wasn't pissed off about that.  I also fast-forwarded through them some, and that helped, too.  I do have to give the narrator's props for reading these sex scenes out loud, because wow, they were raw.  Also some props for the Author, for always keeping it real with the way she writes her sex scenes.  (I suppose I can let it slide the couple times she referred to a vagina as a sex…serious pet-peeve of mine.) 
 
While I had some issues with the MC (Blair is one f'-ed up chic) and the believability of the story...I think, overall, I liked how different this story is…it wasn't cliched like a lot of New Adult/Contemporary Romance stories out these days.  The fate of the love triangle will leave you wondering just which direction it's going in, right up until the very end.
 
Will I read more from this Author?⇜ Maybe…
 

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review 2017-11-06 03:03
I'll Give You the Sun - review
I'll Give You the Sun - Jandy Nelson

 

Noah and Jude are twins, and both very artistically inclined. This book follows the twins through some difficult times. It jumps back and forth between years and alternates between Noah and Jude's viewpoints.

 

This book deals with a lot of issues that teens might face, including questioning their sexuality, sex, death, divorce, mental health, and more. I didn't love the book, maybe because I don't usually enjoy realistic fiction. I read it for my Young Adult Literature class, and I probably wouldn't have picked it myself. But I am trying to branch out a bit.

 

Anyway, the book is well written and I can see the appeal it has for young adults. They can easily identify with the characters even if their own situation is a bit different. What bothers me about some of these stories is the romantic relationships. Books like this promote unrealistic expectations about love and relationships. Most of us don't find our "soulmate" (if one even exists), and we don't often experience a love that was "meant to be." Sad I know, but it seems worse to make teens think that this is how love works. 

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