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review 2018-07-15 17:17
We Were Made to Be Courageous
Unafraid: Be you. Be authentic. Find the grit and grace to shine. - Carey Scott

With the current prevalence of social media, there is an overwhelming lack of genuineness in daily life. Filters create images of people as fairies, animals, you name it, and it doesn’t stop at photos. Whether we’re talking about Facebook posts, text messages, chats, emails, or even video conferencing, the personality we project often isn’t our true self. Instead, it’s the mask that we feel the need to put on for that particular person or situation, and we’re so used to donning it that most of the time we’re not even aware of it. Juggling the myriad roles we play, the busyness of life fuels the masquerade. So how do we get off this crazy carousel of lost identity? That’s where Carey Scott’s “Unafraid: Be You. Be Authentic. Find the Grit and Grace to Shine.” comes in.

This uplifting, inspirational nonfiction book is overflowing with wisdom and guidance about how to be real and authentic through embracing our identity as Christians because “when we really sink our teeth into the truth that our identity is fully rooted in our Creator, it will change everything…if you’re afraid to be real in a world that glorifies the fake, scripture will help you find the grit and grace to unabashedly be yourself.” Scott is not afraid to get down and dirty with readers, speaking truth in a very relational tone that feels like sitting down for coffee with a friend. The numerous Bible verses employed throughout are in modern translation, which I found a bit jarring at first but which actually offered a different perspective and deeper insight. Each chapter concludes with two sections: “Finding the Grit”, which presents application questions, and “Finding the Grace”, which consists of a prayer. “Unafraid” is written for women, and no matter your situation or circumstance, I guarantee that this book will speak to your heart.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing and was under no obligation to post a review.

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-07-15 16:24
Im Rücken steckt das Messer von Hans Bankl
Im Rücken steckt das Messer: Geschichten aus der Gerichtsmedizin (German Edition) - Hans Bankl

Bankl, eine Koryphäe der Gerichtsmedizin und Autor von so manchem medizinischem Lehrbuch, das sich in meinem Schrank befindet, beschreibt hier in vielen Unterkapiteln Kuriositäten und Wissenschaftliches aus seinem Fach. Er spikt dies mit Fallbeispielen historischer, aber auch aktueller Natur. Und so wird dieses Buch ausgesprochen unterhaltsam und lehrreich - für Kollegen aber auch Laien.

 

Wer also in die Arbeit des forensischen Pathologen Einblick haben will, der möge einen Blick in diese Seiten werfen!

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text 2018-07-13 14:27
Fascism: A Warning - Reshelving
Fascism: A Warning - Madeleine Albright

I'v e been trying to make myself pick this up and move beyond the first chapter, but the subject matter is just too heavy for me right now. I'm reshelving it and will try again later.

 

Right now, I'm doing comfort re-reads on audio, and for my bound book reading, I'm going to do some light fiction for a while until I'm in a better frame of mind.

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review 2018-07-12 19:32
Living and Dying
The Bright Hour - Nina Riggs
When Breath Becomes Air - Paul Kalanithi,Abraham Verghese
The Year of Magical Thinking - Joan Didion
Blue Nights by Didion, Joan 1st (first) Edition [Hardcover(2011)] - Joan Didion
A Widow's Story - Joyce Carol Oates
Missing Mom - Joyce Carol Oates
About Alice - Calvin Trillin
How We Die: Reflections of Life's Final Chapter - Sherwin B. Nuland

So, I've been off BL for a long, long time. A lot has happened, I got pregnant and had a daughter. My mom got sick and passed away. I had to clear out and sell my childhood home and all the contents while trying to balance all of that and my full time job. It's been...something.

 

For a while, not long after my mom died (3 days before Christmas 2016 when my daughter was only 5 months old) I started searching out and reading books that dealt with death and grief. I read a lot of Joan Didion The Year of Magical ThinkingBlue Nights. I read When Breath Becomes Air and About Alice and A Widow's Story. I started Missing Mom and couldn't go any further because it was too hard and How We Die.

 

The Bright Hour is one of the most beautiful books I've read, ever. I can't possibly describe it except to use it's full title--The Bright Hour: a memoir of living and dying. It is so full of life, all the messiness and happiness and tragedy and humor and it faces death and mortality head on, unflinching. 

 

I recently reread it, now a year and a half since my mother passed, it still has such power and peace. I can't recommend it enough.

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review 2018-07-08 22:30
Your Turn FOR Care - very specialized, read for work
Your Turn for Care: Surviving the Aging and Death of the Adults Who Harmed You - Laura S. Brown

This is a book about relating to elders, caregiving, and death for people whose personal childhood story was a horror movie, not a Hallmark card.

 

For those adults who are pursuing relationships with and/or becoming caregivers to elders who were reasonably loving, decent, and honorable in their relationships with you, those complications are difficult in and of themselves...

 

There is a group of adults whose dilemmas in dealing with the aging, illness, and death of elders are complex beyond the norm. This book is for those folks—for adults raised in families that were frightening, confusing, dangerous, sometimes criminal in their treatment of their children. The elders in these families are...people who...behaved in vicious, venal, abusive, and/or neglectful ways to those children. You are those children, grown into adults confronted with cultural and social demands to relate to those elders, and sometimes to step into the caregiver role.

 

This is an almost one-of-a-kind resource, since nobody seems to have put together two clear facts: a huge number of children are abused in childhood, and [in the US] a full 60% of elderly people are being cared for solely by family. That number increases to 95% if we include family taking any role in caregiving for a family member. So it is clear that many people who were abused in childhood are now caring for that abusive parent/primary caregiver in their elderly years. 

 

Surprisingly, there was nothing in the self-help literature (and there seems to be little or no scholarly research finished or even in process) for those adult children who are now either feeling pressured to care for their former abusive caregiver or who are already doing so. 

 

Obviously this can be problematic on a number of levels.

 

I'm only writing this review so others will know of this resource. Written in a very open and non-prescriptive style, readers can take what they need and ignore the rest. For those who want much clearer "do this" and "don't do that" guidance, this may feel somewhat nebulous. The bottom line comes down to "you do not have to care for this person who harmed you when you were the vulnerable one." 

 

There is tremendous personal and societal pressure to take on the role of caregiver to an elderly person, but that may be a very bad idea for a number of reasons -- both to the adult child and to the formerly abusive older person. (And not every abusive person becomes lovely and kind in old age. They may continue some abusive patterns throughout life.)

 

Unfortunately, the US medical system doesn't much care if this person terrorized you, they will assume you either should or must take on this new project. Armed at least with one resource, hopefully we can avoid everyone feeling like they must be the primary caregiver to the person who failed so horribly in this role years before.

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