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quote 2017-04-23 20:00
And it sounds so easy in the stories, even when it’s not. Even when there are millions of obstacles, heroes know exactly what to do. There is always a way out. But the problem with real life is, there is not. And storytellers, you know what their problem is? There are millions of worlds in their heads. They know magic, and love, and hatred, and they have a metaphor for every feeling you can imagine. As tellers, they are fantastic. But when they become characters, it changes completely.

The Storyteller by Andrea Tomić

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quote 2017-04-12 21:32
I do things like get in a taxi and say, "The library, and step on it.”

—David Foster Wallace

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quote 2017-04-06 23:46
"I don’t think beer is the answer,” I told him, dropping two Tylenols into his palm for his five A.M. dose.

“It’s the answer if the question is ‘What’s cold and delicious and makes ya forget that ya feel like your head’s about to explode?'"

—Molly Harper

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quote 2017-04-05 16:07
By now, it is probably very late at night, and you have stayed up to read this book when you should have gone to sleep. If this is the case, then I commend you for falling into my trap. It is a writer's greatest pleasure to hear that someone was kept up until the unholy hours of the morning reading one of his books. It goes back to authors being terrible people who delight in the suffering of others. Plus, we get a kickback from the caffeine industry...

—Brandon Sanderson

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-03-27 22:55
Arthur and Sherlock
Arthur and Sherlock: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes - Michael Sims

Interestingly informative book about Arthur Conan Doyle's creation of the Sherlock Holmes character, drawing from childhood inspirations (perhaps Dr. Watson was named after someone that had attended a school here or for the name of this other person there) and his adult life - specifically, the practice of doctors at the University of Edinburgh, notably, Dr. Joseph Bell, using physical clues to 'deduce' facts about their patients. A lot of comparisons are rightfully drawn between Dr. Bell and Sherlock Holmes, including the emphasis that while the 'science of deduction' seemed magical, "such assessments required educated scrutiny but not second sight."

 

The book also goes into the history and increasing popularity of the 'science of deduction' and pokes at the fact that deduction is the wrong word entirely for the line of logic that Sherlock Holmes uses. The history and influence of the crime genre in literature, going from sensationalism to thriller and eventually leading to series featured around singular detective characters, is also examined. A lot of name-dropping happens for books and authors that I had barely or never heard of, or the books that I knew them to be famous for were not the ones that the 19th century reader knew well.

 

Overall, it was well-researched, but the chronology was a bit skewed and the writing tended to end on a tangent and pick up on a completely different topic's tangent from a chapter ago. I did not read it all in one shot so it did not bother me.

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