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Search tags: Sea-Adventures
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review 2019-02-20 00:59
Book Tour: Trials and Trails
Trials and Trails: Adventures and Unexpected Discoveries of Life - Jim Halverson

We follow a young man that joins up with another after a cattle drive in Nebraska that came from Texas. His name is Leroy. The man that helps him and join him is named Johnny B. We follow them as they had North and somewhat West.

We learn about the lives a bit and nature though out the book. We go on trails and adventures with them both. It fun to see where they go and what they experience. They even meet up with a lady named Alice. They seem to want to help folks and find there their own way in the world.

We learn about Leroy past and a little bit of Johnny B's. You will surprised at the end as to who Leroy's father is? I can not tell you as it would be a bummer and spoiler. What would do if you are treated as a slave but find out something socking about your parents? I wondered why Leroy was able to get a education along with the master's son? Did he know that he had a brother or not?

The author does so well with story that you want to go along for the ride. I enjoyed it and would like read more by this author. He talented. He put me in the era that his story was telling. It was nice going across the west by horseback and being able to visualize the USA West as I was reading.

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text 2019-02-12 17:44
BLOG TOUR, REVIEW & #GIVEAWAY - The Sign of the Serpent (The Adventures of Marisol Holmes #2) by Majanka Verstraete
The Sign of the Serpent (The Adventures of Marisol Holmes #2) - Majanka Verstraete

Meet Marisol Holmes: High School Student, jaguar shifter, and great granddaughter of Sherlock Holmes. She’s solved countless supernatural cases, but her next one’s the hardest yet. Why?

 

Marisol is about to lose her heart.

Two days ago, terrible events shattered the very foundation of the Conclave. Now, Marisol Holmes swears she’ll stop at nothing to destroy the man she once loved: her arch nemesis, Mannix.

But when a cryptic clue left by Mannix leads Marisol to a secret room that once belonged to her father, she realizes that hunting down Mannix won’t be that easy. If she wants to catch him, she’ll have to retrace the steps of her own past and discovers secrets that might have been best left buried.

When the hunt for Mannix brings Marisol to London, she teams up again with Roan and Wyatt on a quest for the truth that leads her through the dark alleys of London, to shady shifter pubs, to libraries cloaked in magic, and eventually to an abandoned castle in Scotland that once belonged to her family.

But Mannix is as sadistic as he’s smart. At every turn, Marisol and her friends face harsh truths and deadly puzzles, and risk their lives to uncover a past that should stay buried. With the stakes getting higher and Marisol’s attraction to Roan growing, can Marisol deny what she truly wants, even if it puts her new love on a collision course with her villainous ex?

Source: archaeolibrarian.wixsite.com/website/single-post/2019/02/12/BLOG-TOUR-REVIEW-GIVEAWAY---The-Sign-of-the-Serpent-The-Adventures-of-Marisol-Holmes-2-by-Majanka-Verstraete
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review 2019-02-03 20:41
The Living Room
The Living Room - Graham Greene

A young woman who has an affair with a married man returns to her Catholic family for her mother's funeral. The news of the affair does not sit well with the family.

 

The Living Room reminded me of why I struggle with Greene's work that centres on his religious outlook - it always seems like he is trying to reconcile different positions of thought that are mutually exclusive unless one is prepared to find a practical compromise. But this would be an act of hypocrisy. 

The thing is, Greene seemed to have managed the "compromise" in real life (it is hard to ignore the setup of the story in this play as something Greene himself would have been familiar with) but he just doesn't use that path for his characters, which makes for aggravating reading. Worse, if, like me, one has no interest in the repeat of Greene's theoretical struggle with Catholicism, it becomes a chore to follow the story.

 

The production of the play (starring Julian Sands) was excellent, but neither the cast nor the occasional snippets of wit can take away from the completely avoidable moral dilemma, and I'm not even sure it would have been a necessary dilemma at the point of writing (in the 1950s).

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review 2019-01-24 01:32
Voltron v3
Voltron Legendary Defender volume 3: Absolution - Mitch Iverson

 

 

 

The art in these volumes never ceases to amaze me. So brilliant and accurate.

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review 2019-01-22 04:24
On These Mean Streets
Mean Streets - Jim Butcher,Simon R. Green,Kat Richardson,Thomas E. Sniegoski,Dion Graham,Richard Poe,Mia Baron,T. Ryder Smith

This is a collection of four longer novellas in the urban fantasy genre written by a quarter of well-regarded writers that showcases each of their characters in ongoing series. I have actually read two of these already: "The Warrior" by Jim Butcher and "What a Difference a Day Makes" by Simon R. Green. "The Third Death of the Little Clay Dog" by Kat Richardson and "Noah's Orphans" by Thomas E. Sniegoski are new reads for me. My favorites were "The Warrior" and "The Third Death of the Little Clay Dog."

"Changes" is a Harry Dresden story that heavily features Harry's friend Michael Carpenter and his family. It's also about how being a hero is not just taking up a sword. It's a culmination of many small choices one makes everyday in how they interact with people around them. The lesson was really important and the plotting flawless. Short but substantial. 5 stars

"What a Difference a Day Makes" by Simon R. Green doesn't measure up to the other stories in this volume because it doesn't have the deep character development, pathos or growth of the other stories. I say this as a big admirer of Simon R. Green. His work is very good, and it works for what its doing, but his real brilliance shows in his longer work than his shorter work. Having said that, I enjoy Green's noir style and the just plain weirdness of his imagination. This story is good but not great. 3 stars.

"The Third Death of the Little Clay Dog" by Kat Richardson is the first I've read by her and I'm a fan. I loved the intricate look into Mexican culture, specifically Dia de los Muertos. Most non-Mexicans don't really get what this is about. It's not a spooky holiday in the way we think about Halloween. It's a deeply meaningful holiday in which people remember and celebrate those they have lost to death. There are some folkloric underpinnings that may not make sense, and probably some aspects that might be a dealbreaker for some people. While the holiday is not spooky, this story is written to have some aspects of the macabre to it. Definitely a ghost story, and it's also about magic, dark and light. I really appreciated this story and I loved the narrator. She did a great job with the Spanish pronunciations and in distinguishing the different voices from one another. 5 stars.

"Noah's Orphans" by Thomas E. Sniegoski is thoughtful and sober storytelling. The concept behind it resonated with me as a Christian who grew up reading the Bible and is acquainted with the Noah's Ark tale. This book has a 'what if' aspect to it that got my mind spinning. Consistent for the rest of the series, but rather joyless. 4 stars.

Overall, a good book, and worth listening to on audiobook.

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