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Search tags: classic-literature
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review 2020-05-20 19:31
The Call Of The Wild by Jack London
The Call of the Wild/White Fang - Jack London
Wow!
I went through so many emotions while listening to this audiobook.
I was outraged at the abuse that occurred throughout. I was excited by the perseverance of the animals. I was saddened with each death. I was elated when freedom reigned.
I now know why this is such an acclaimed classic story.
It's brilliant!
It really takes you through it all, on each step of this cold journey. You really feel a sense of what it could have been like at that time, in that place.
Now I look forward to seeing the film. I have heard mixed reviews but love drawing my own conclusions. I suggest you forget whatever you may or may not have heard and do the same for yourself.
 
 
Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2020/05/the-call-of-wild-by-jack-london-30.html
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text 2020-04-01 18:23
Reads for the apocalypse
Few Eggs and No Oranges: The Diaries of Vere Hodgson 1940-45 - Vere Hodgson,Jenny Hartley

I've had this one sitting around for a while - diaries from the London Blitz and WWII. This seems like a good time to read about REAL hardship, as opposed to what I'm experiencing right now, with the "hardship" of boredom and having to buy frozen chicken breasts instead of the packages of fresh ones that I prefer.

 

I think I'll just read a few entries a day.

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review 2020-02-19 16:47
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
The Tale of Peter Rabbit - Beatrix Potter
I read this as a child, but didn't remember a bit of it while reading now.
It's a very quick read indeed.
It's a cute story about a mischievous rabbit named Peter. It's not very long but it packs a little punch. You really want Peter to behave, but in all honesty, that would make for a boring read.
This story is classic, though it really can be read in any era. 
I love the illustrations! They compliment the story so well!
 
 
 
Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2020/02/the-tale-of-peter-rabbit-by-beatrix.html
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review 2020-02-08 19:26
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - Mark Twain,Guy Cardwell,John Seelye

I had read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as a young girl in school but we didn't read this book, which is the first of the series. I now know and understand why. It is highly inappropriate for young minds. In this modern age reading it, I found myself slightly offended at times. Too much mention of the n-word, calling my kinfolk Injun, and robbing people then having orgies. UGH.
Still, I get why it's a brilliant book.
A book for adults. Real literature that introduces you to Tom and Huck. You get their friendship and understand why they are they way they are. Tom seems like such a problematic lad, but this book helps you understand why. It was great having Tom's aspect.
So then I went to get a copy of Huck Finn. Now I want to reread that one. I loved it when we read it in school, but it was over 30 years ago! Time to find out if I love it still. Something tells me I will, and with a deeper understanding.

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2020/02/the-adventures-of-tom-sawyer-by-mark.html
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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-10-29 06:29
Dracula: The Original Flavor
Dracula - Bram Stoker

The last time I read Dracula, I was probably 16 or 17, and what I remembered most fondly was that it was eminently readable. Most 19th-century literature has all kinds of tortured text that makes high school students balk, but this one breezed by. In the ensuing years, I grew up, had kids, wrote a vampire novel of my own, and now it's time to ask, "does it hold up?"

 

Yeah. Pretty much.

 

Dracula is an essential part of horror literature, sure, but in our times of four-color cinema it is hard not to also acknowledge him as one of the first supervillains. The Count has been portrayed literally hundreds of times in adaptations of this work, and it is fascinating to see the original details that don't always make the cut.

 

The Count begins the story with no servants, since he must feed nearly every night, and word has gotten around Transylvania not to go near his castle. His imprisonment of Jonathan Harker is well-thought-out, as he forces Harker to sign letters saying all is well and sends them at later dates to keep up the fiction that Harker will return home. Dracula's sailing trip on the Demeter is less well-planned. The suspense there is all well and good, but feeding on the skeleton crew makes it surprising that he ever made it to England in the first place.

 

When Dr. Van Helsing is brought in from the Netherlands, he is not yet the hardened vampire hunter portrayed in many adaptations. He is unsure of his diagnosis of Lucy's problems, and neglects to tell her family not to remove the garlic flowers that are "part of her cure." He also makes a rather critical mistake some fellow readers have identified as a plot hole -- when he knows a vampire is in the neighborhood and has already struck Lucy, he and the boys leave Mina alone at night. I think there are a few spots where his Dutch accent comes and goes, but it may be because journals from other points of view don't record his accent and we only get the full effect in chapters that are supposed to be his journal.

 

Mina Murray is not exactly a modern heroine who doesn't need rescuing, but she's not a cipher of a character, either. Could she have been more? Certainly, but she's not bad as is. Her revulsion at being bitten and spiritual horror at the Eucharist burning her makes for a powerful scene. The disgust leads her to take charge and propose the hypnotism sessions that are instrumental to the plot in the second half of the book. I had never made the connection before this reread, but Harry Potter's Occlumency sessions may owe a debt to Mina and Dracula.

 

And unlike modern supervillains who rely on action-movie climaxes, Dracula is straight-up sensible. When he knows he's got a few hunters after him, he knows he's helpless during the day. So he flees London to go home and try again in another century because he's got time on his side. He's at least as much prey as he is predator, which is kind of a refreshing change.

 

The book is not without its cheese, of course. In the final few pages, one of the protagonists dies heroically, and then two characters name their baby after him. Today, that's the tropiest trope that ever did trope (see Star Wars expanded universe, Potter, the works), but now it's got me curious to see if that was Stoker's invention or whether it was common practice as far back as the penny dreadfuls. There's also bits of social commentary through cynical working-class cemetery custodians and Mina waxing poetic about "the wonderful power of money," which I find hilarious. (Apparently even before Batman and Zorro, authors knew you can't hunt a supervillain without some cash in the bank.)

 

All told, Dracula is quite an enjoyable read, some 120 years after its first print run. I wouldn't go so far as to call it immortal, but it sure isn't dead yet.

Source: www.amazon.com/Dracula-Bram-Stoker/dp/1503261387/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1540794068&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=dracula&psc=1
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