Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Soup
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-03-04 19:08
The Sunday Post ... with Soup

Winter returned again last week, with some Siberian blasts that caused heavy snow storms and, because this part of the world doesn't cope well with the white stuff, a lot of chaos. 

People were stuck in places outside of the city limits, and it is only thanks to a lot of effort of volunteering farmers and council gritters that things got moving again by the weekend. Still, I have a friend who's been stuck at an airport in England since Thursday.


Despite the many, many news of people being stuck, road traffic accidents, and stupidity of people freaking out (as if no one can read a weather forecast...gaah...), there were also some great things happening during this unusual weather event: 


People volunteered a lot of help, especially out in the rural areas, to shovel, plough, and grit to help people out. Some of the responses have been rather awesome and do show that humanity is not doomed, yet.

It also seemed like people who got to go events that hadn't been cancelled, were in a particularly cheerful mood.  


I had a full schedule this weekend, starting with a theatre show on Friday night and spending much of Saturday at an event celebrating the centenary of Women's Suffrage in the UK (which rather unexpectedly included a civic reception arranged by the Lord Provost at the Town House),so today was really the first time I had a chance potter about. And as it is Sunday, I celebrated my day of doing bugger all by making some soup.


This week's concoction is a Sweet and Sour Chunky Potato Soup:



It is really simple to make and I love the taste of it. It should be even better tomorrow, when the gherkin juice and vinegar had a chance to permeate the veg. 




- 3 - 4 Potatoes, chopped into small chunks

- 2 carrots, cut into small pieces

- 1 onion, chopped

- 2 sticks of celery

- 2 tbs vinegar

- 2 tbs flour 

- 2 (veggie) frankfurters, sliced

- stock

- salt, pepper, paprika

- gherkins & the water they come in

- pinch of sugar


I added the potatoes, carrots, celery, half of the onion to the stock and boiled until they were halfway done. 


Meanwhile, I added the rest of the onion and the frankfurters to a pan and fried them. 


Once the veg are softening, I added the gherkins, juice, vinegar, salt/pepper/paprika to taste, and added the browned sausage/onion. 

I mixed the flour with some cold water and added as much as needed to thicken the soup a little. Once the potatoes are boiled, it's done.



This is definitely a soup I'll make again. And of course there is plenty left for tomorrow.


Happy Sunday, All!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-02 20:02
Mouse Soup - Arnold Lobel

For more reviews, check out my blog: Craft-Cycle

A nice story about a clever mouse outwitting a hungry weasel. The book consists of a larger story and four short stories within it. It was an interesting set-up and made the book entertaining. Good illustrations with nice detail. 

Some of the pages are a bit text-heavy. This book is recommended as a Reading Level 2 (Reading with Help). Vocabulary-wise I would say this is accurate, but some children may find the word to picture ratio a bit overwhelming. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-02-26 00:42
The Sunday Post ... But with a Twist

Well, it is Sunday, and this is a post, but as some of you may have noticed, I have been out and about enjoying this year's Granite Noir Festival this weekend. The Granite Noir Festival is a short local event that celebrates crime writing - with lots of readings, author meets, workshops, tours, theatre, exhibitions, etc. For such a relatively small interest group in this rather remote part of the world, there was a lot to see and do.


I have already written about the author event last night, with Hugh Fraser and Robert Daws, and I had planned to join the conversation with Val McDermid on Friday night also, but may have fallen asleep on the sofa after work... Um, yeah. Never mind.


Anyway, the main event for me this weekend took place tonight in the rather snazzy restaurant of our local theatre - A Poisoned Cocktail Party hosted by none other than Dr Katheryn Harkup, author of A is for Arsenic (which you've probably heard me gush on about in the past)  and Making the Monster (which I am currently enjoying). 


So, here is the twist ... Instead of our usual Sunday Soup feature, I will share some of the cocktails with you.

The idea was that with each "round", Dr. Harkup would tell about some of the ingredients and what made them poisonous and present stories - mostly of a dark but humorous nature - about the use of the poison. Btw, these were not all the same ones as described in A is for Arsenic, which made for an added bonus of interesting trivia.


First off, we had this one:



This was a concoction of gin, Cointreau, and absinthe (or rather essence of absinthe), with a shot of juice (can't remember which one but there was a slight hint of grapefruit). 

The cocktail itself was not a winner for me - it was remarkably bland. 


However, the story of how absinthe was used and how the thujone, the compound in the ingredient wormwood, can be toxic and lead to hallucinations and convulsions. There is, apparently, very little of the stuff in absinthe, and most of the problems with absinthe may have been caused by the high percentage of alcohol in the drink - but it was interesting to hear that Victorians also added copper compounds and other things to the drink to get the green colour. And those added impurities may actually be a cause of concern of their own.


We also heard about Brazil nuts, which may, apart from selenium, also contain uranium, depending on where they have grown. Delightful.


In Round # 2, we were given this yummy looking duo:



That is, tapenade with poppy seed crackers (to soak up some of the %), and a blood orange and amaretto cocktail - which was delicious.


Let me just say, there was nothing to worry about with the olive dish. 


The drink, of course, provided the anchor for a discussion of cyanide, which was one of the poisons described in A is for Arsenic that I found particularly fascinating. It is fast and effective, and horrible. And yet, cyanide compounds are in so many things other than bitter almonds, cherry stones, apricot stones, and apple pips - but it is the reaction with stomach acid that causes the problems. (Btw, apparently one would have to ingest about 200 apple seeds before the getting into trouble.)


The poppy seed crackers led to one of the most elaborate discussions of the evening - which was all about opium and its derivatives morphine and heroin. It still shocks me that heroin was prescribed as a "non-addictive" painkiller and given over the counter to anyone, including teething babies.


Lastly, we had this one:



I have no idea what was in that other than some coffee-based liquor like Kahlua or Tia Maria. I don't drink a lot and was already struggling with the previous two cocktails at this point. (I could, of course, have opted for the non-alcoholic versions on offer, but ... nah... )


The cocktail was ok. I was far more interested in Dr. Harkup's discussion about caffeine. It is also a neurotoxin, but it is so prevalent in our diet that most humans have build up some sort of tolerance to it. However, there has apparently been an experiment where  spiders were given different drugs and the scientists observed the effect on the spiders' web spinning skills. Apparently caffeine messed them up tremendously. 


Read more about this here or here


What have I learned from this evening? Buy your cyanide fresh and take your coffee seriously!


In all seriousness, tho, this was a brilliant event and I can only recommend that, if you have the chance, you go and see Dr. Harkup talks or read one of her books. 

But then, you already know that I'm a fan.


Happy Sunday!


Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-12-10 18:13
Sunday Soup

It's been freezing all weekend. Not only did we have snow, which actually stayed for three days (and counting...) but for most of today we had temperatures of -5C (-9C! on the other side of town).


We don't get freezing temperatures that often this close to the sea.


It is of no surprise then that I have craved hot soup all day. :) The drawback was that I needed to use things I had in the kitchen as I had no intention of going to the shops. The pavements are all covered in ice...


Today's odds'n'ends soup turned out tasty enough, albeit I wouldn't say it's a new favourite. It also had some kick to it as I found a green chili pepper in the fridge. 



What else is in there:


- onion

- garlic

- courgette

- carrot

- peas

- sweetcorn

- small potato

- stock

- blob of cream cheese

- salt, pepper, paprika

- green chili pepper


some grated cheese on top.


Happy Soup Sunday!


Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-11-20 20:06
Sunday Soup ... a bit later...

My weekend was mostly spent recovering from the long haul travel back home, unpacking, sleeping, and ... craving comfort food to get over the 30C difference in outside temperatures between Kuala Lumpur and Home.


Fall has properly arrived in Scotland and temperatures have dropped over the last couple of weeks. 


So, what better to relax with than a nice warm bowl of soup?


Of course, I also started to miss all the lovely food I came across in Malaysia and I tried to find a recipe that would tick off that craving, too. 


I finally got inspired by some recipes I found for Thai Chicken Noodle Soup - but as I could not be bothered going to the shops to buy ingredients, I improvised with what I could find at home.


This is what I ended up with:





1-2 x leeks,
1 x can of sweetcorn
1/2 x can of kidney beans,
2-3 Quorn (veggie) chicken fillets (sliced),
1/3 pouch (3 tsp) x Red Thai Curry paste
1 sachet x coconut cream
Kaffir Lime leaves
Salt, water
Rice noodles



It was delicious. :D



Also, I believe the use of leeks in this should qualify my delicious soup experiment for the task for Calan Gaeaf (Square #1 of the 16 Festive Tasks):


Tasks for Calan Gaeaf: If you’re superstition-proof, inscribe your name on a rock, toss it in a fire and take a picture to post –OR– Make a cozy wintertime dish involving leeks (the national plant of Wales) and post the recipe and pictures with your thoughts about how it turned out.


More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?