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Search tags: Stephen-Hoye
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review 2016-03-09 18:30
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury, narrated by Stephen Howe
The Martian Chronicles - Ray Bradbury,Stephen Hoye

 

The Martian Chronicles is an amazing collection of interconnected stories about Mars. Human missions to Mars, religious missions to Mars, nervous breakdowns on Mars, etc... Even though some of the tales are outdated by today's views, the underlying values and messages remain the same; they are timeless.

 

Some of the stories have been released previously, and some have been changed over the years. I discovered, thanks to Wiki, that one tale having to do with race relations, was not included in this collection at all. I'm not sure it really matters, but just know that this anthology is NOT the same as it was upon its original release.

 

There's not much new I can add to what's already been said about The Martian Chronicles. Ray Bradbury's writing is so simple, yet so evocative-he can get across in just a few words what it takes me paragraphs to say. His observations on human nature are spot on and even though these stories were written back in the 40's and 50's, most of them are still relevant today.

 

Classics are classics for a reason and this one is truly special. My highest recommendation!

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review 2014-08-13 00:00
The Last Gunfight: The Real Story of the Shootout at the O.K. Corral---and How It Changed the American West
The Last Gunfight: The Real Story of the Shootout at the O.K. Corral---and How It Changed the American West - Jeff Guinn,Stephen Hoye Bought the audiobook on the cheap from Tantor Media, mostly because I'd always been vaguely curious as to what that had all been about.

Overall, a very interesting listen, though the prose itself was a bit florid and tended to descriptors. Possibly the author had read too many Westerns? The treatment of the Apache was also pretty unsympathetic, though they were incidental to the main plot, so that wasn't as aggravating as it could have been.

Since I don't really know anything about Tombstone, I couldn't tell if the author was taking sides, but he did seem to want to present all sides, and when the course of events was unclear he presented multiple accounts. He was probably a shade more sympathetic to the Earps than I might have been, but was clear enough about his sources that one could see where he was coming from.
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review 2014-08-11 00:00
Fahrenheit 451
Fahrenheit 451 - Stephen Hoye,Ray Bradbury I liked this, but I think I'm one of the few who didn't love it.
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review 2014-08-11 00:00
Fahrenheit 451
Fahrenheit 451 - Stephen Hoye,Ray Bradbury I liked this, but I think I'm one of the few who didn't love it.
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review 2013-12-04 05:39
The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee, read by Stephen Hoye
The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer - Stephen Hoye,Siddhartha Mukherjee

I can only stand cancer in fiction to a very limited degree. Too many childhood memories of my grandmother on my mom’s side and the lung cancer and treatments that eventually killed her. However, nonfiction books about diseases interest me, and I figured that nonfiction might have more distance and be less emotional than fiction. I needed an audiobook to listen to while I worked, and this one was long enough to keep me occupied for quite a while.

Considering my requirements, the beginning of this book was not promising. Mukherjee started off with the story of a patient of his, Carla - her initial odd illness and eventual cancer diagnosis. This was not the emotional distance I was looking for, and I ended up connecting to this first portion of the book more personally and painfully than I expected to. Almost a year and a half ago, I was diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C, and this early bit about Carla reminded me strongly of sitting with my hepatitis doctor and discussing what that diagnosis meant and what my choices were.

Thankfully, although he continued to touch on Carla and other patients’ stories throughout the book, Mukherjee soon turned to the overall science and history of cancer. It was fascinating and often horrifying. Since I listened to the audiobook version and didn’t take more than a couple scribbled notes while I was listening, I can’t give too many details about the sorts of topics he covered. What I'll do instead is write about the things that stuck with me.

In the back of my mind, I think I had the idea that cancer was a modern disease. Mukherjee discussed many of the misconceptions people have about cancer, and this was one of them. Just because people didn’t have the vocabulary to discuss it didn’t mean it didn’t exist. And, just because we call all sorts of cancers “cancer” doesn’t mean they’re all one monolithic disease.

The sections on attempts to cure cancer were often cringe-inducing. Although Mukherjee wrote about cancer treatment history from a physician’s perspective, my mind kept interjecting “patient’s perspective” horror. Early mastectomies performed without anesthesia. Radical mastectomies that seemed like a contest between surgeons, to see who could successfully remove the most tissue (and, in some cases, bone). I had to stop the book a few times, so that the images in my mind could dissipate.

And none of those horrors even guaranteed that the patients would remain cancer-free. Mukherjee discussed the discoveries that allowed scientists to better understand various cancers and try to develop treatments that could destroy cancer cells more directly and, hopefully, cause less lasting damage to the patients. One of the things I marveled at was how interconnected diseases and their treatments can be. Lessons learned from the treatment of cancer were applied to the treatment of AIDS and hepatitis B. I remembered seeing some of those same connections when I researched the drugs I was going to be on to treat my hepatitis C.

It felt like Mukherjee covered some of just about everything related to cancer: its history, its science, its treatment, the people who studied it and raised money to research it, the politics surrounding it. For the most part, he explained things in a clear and easy-to-understand way, although I admit I got a little lost during some of the parts near the end on proteins and genetics. I was only really aware of how long the book was during the last three or so discs, which I felt dragged a little.

I’m not sure I could call this a reassuring read, but it was, overall, fascinating and incredibly informative.

 

(Original review, with read-alikes, posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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