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text 2021-02-10 13:48
Reasons why Swift is Preferred over Objective-C!

If you are willing to develop a futuristic iOS app for your target audience, then Swift should be your preferred choice. This is so because Swift iOS app development is cost-effective and requires less coding efforts as the language is intuitive, easier to learn, and comes with several advanced features and powerful tools. This modern programming language is going to survive for long due to the plethora of benefits that it offers, as compared to its old competitor, Objective-C.

 

Earlier, Objective-C was principally used for building iOS applications. However, it became out-dated slowly due to the lack of several useful features offered by other new-age programming languages. Apple Corp had worked on Objective-C improvements for almost 6 years and understood that a better language could be introduced for writing mobile applications. Due to such loopholes of Objective-C, Apple introduced an advanced language in 2014- Swift which had pioneering features to accelerate the iOS app development.

 

Swift is general-purpose, multi-paradigm, and compiled language. It is a fast, safe, and interactive language specially developed for iOS, macOS, Linux, tvOS, and watchOS. It soon superseded Objective-C and became the favorite of developers across the world. Several giants like LinkedIn, IBM, Facebook, Mozilla, Uber, etc. were already using Swift but now, even start-ups have started focussing on it.

In this blog, we will explore the key reasons why start-ups choose Swift for iOS app development instead of Objective-C.

 

Top Reasons why Start-ups Prefer Swift over Objective-C

 

 

Swift is quite successful today not only because it is feature-rich and well-structured, but also due to the huge support of millions of people, globally. Its independently managed conferences enhance the Swift community. Also, there are two main differences between Swift and Objective-C:

 

  • Swift isn’t a superset of C, so, it can freely make use of syntax constructs. This enables the implementation of custom operators.
  • Swift is not dynamically typed but it is statically typed, due to which it can take benefit of a number of recent advancements in the type systems.

 

Let us understand in detail about what more is there for start-ups to prefer Swift over Objective-C.

 

Open-Source and Fast-Growing Language

 

Swift is the fastest-growing open-source language and has great potential. It can be immediately accessible to anyone and start-ups can take advantage of this. Also, Swift can be applied across several platforms and backend infrastructure as well since it is open-source. It is also available on Linux and efforts are being made to bring it to Windows. Swift receives feedback from the iOS app development community to make improvements to get more structured. Comparatively, Objective-C isn’t an open-source language and also becoming out-dated gradually.

 

Less Coding Efforts and Less Prone to Errors

 

Swift is a functional programming language and allows passing functions as variables. It also allows manipulation of data and text strings. This lets the Swift developers develop generic code which reduces the coding efforts to a great extent. So, writing, reading, and modifying the code is easier in Swift which ensures better readability. Also, this language has smaller code lengths due to the use of a feature called- Type interface. This feature helps to avoid incorrect coding and provides less error-prone code.

 

When a null optional variable is used in Swift, a run-time crash is triggered instantaneously. Due to its consistent behavior, this crash forces the bug-fixing process and so, the bugs get fixed instantly. As a result, even the development time reduces.

However, in Objective-C, complete code needs to be written every time there is a change in the code. So, it needs extensive coding and has greater execution time.

 

Shorter Time-to-Market

 

Shorter time-to-market is a critical factor for start-ups. What they want is good-quality products in less time. Of course, they need to hire dedicated iOS app developers for this. But in addition, Swift has package managers that allow the developers to focus on the logic, push their packages for collaboration with others, and use different packages for quickly assembling the applications while significantly reducing the time-to-market.

Similarly, there are many other speed-based advantages that Swift offers over Objective-C apps while developing iOS apps due to which start-ups prefer Swift.

 

Highly Safe and Secure

 

Safety and security is a very important factor while developing mobile apps. Swift has an all-inclusive Security Framework having several APIs that handle authorization services, certificates, keys, trust policies, etc. Some APIs are also used to apply cryptography encryption to the messages. Also, as discussed earlier, the use of a nil optional variable makes the bug-fixing process easier and immediate.

 

Syntax in Swift forces the coders to write a clean and consistent code. It not only saves time but also supports the safety of the apps, though it may feel strict sometimes. The way Swift handles the bugs ensures safer applications as compared to Objective-C.

 

Needs less Maintenance

 

Swift for iOS app development is preferred by start-ups for one more significant reason. This programming language doesn’t have any legacy code and so, needs lesser maintenance as compared to Objective-C. Unlike Swift, Objective-C depends on C for its evolution. In C, iOS app developers need to maintain and manage two separate code files- (.h) header file and (.m) implementation file, for better efficiency and building time of the app. The same legacy is carried forward by Objective-C, which can be cumbersome to manage at times. In the case of Swift, only one single file- (.swift) needs to be maintained, making the overall maintenance quite easier.

 

Has a Bright Future

 

Swift is a well-designed and well-organized programming language. It provides an

enhanced development process along with some excellent features which simplify the developers’ task.

 

Though Swift has emerged just a couple of years ago, yet it has made a tremendous evolution. Undoubtedly, Objective-C won’t vanish from the market but it has definitely started losing ground ever since Swift came into the picture. Also, it is evident from the conferences held by Apple and its software releases that Apple is going to develop Swift with some amazing features. So, we can expect several upgrades of Swift in iOS app development in the future.

 

Key Takeaways:

 

Swift and Objective-C are the two most high-end Apple programming languages. However, Swift supersedes Objective-C in many ways. It is clean, expressive, and intuitive as compared to Objective-C. Also, when it comes to cost-savings, developing a Swift app for your business is the apt choice. So, in this competitive business world, it is advisable for start-ups to opt for Swift and hire Swift app developers for building powerful, immersive, and profitable iOS applications.

 

To know more about our other core technologies, refer to links below

 

React Native App Development Company

 

Angular App Development Company

 

Ionic App Development Company

 

Blockchain App Development

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review 2020-03-29 16:33
Swift Series Collection by: Leslie Pike
Swift Series Collection - Leslie Pike

 

 

 

Fun is a fashion statement and the Swifts prove themselves up to the task. The chase is on and Pike knows that's only half the fun. Atticus and Charlotte. January and Brick. Bristol and Sawyer. Six couples who are determined to keep their heads in the game. Even at the cost of their heart. FABULOUS!
 
 

 

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review 2020-03-26 12:54
Dark Voyage
Dark Voyage - Helen Susan Swift

by Helen Susan Swift

 

Two people are out on a pleasurable boating trip on the North Sea when storm clouds suddenly move in and turn the sea violent. As if that weren't enough to ruin their day, things take a strange turn.

 

This is a ghost ship story with a few weird turns. It did stretch believability in some places, but was overall an interesting read. My one complaint is some lazy writing where one of the main characters would 'just feel' what she was meant to do or that a ghost wanted her to do something.

 

The majority of the story is told through the voice of a doctor who had been on the ghost ship and what happened to the rest of the crew. There are some triggers here. It was a sealing ship and animal lovers like myself may find some passages difficult, though it isn't gratuitous gore. Just the thought of a sailing expedition whose purpose is to slaughter animals, including baby animals, is enough to be upsetting.

 

The writing is excellent and the supernatural aspects of the story are very well done. The beginning and end sequences felt rather rushed, but the bulk of the story, told by the doctor's journal, made for a very good read.

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url 2020-02-01 09:16
Lirik Taylor Swift - Only the Young Terjemahan dan Arti Lagu

Lirik Lagu dan Terjemahan Taylor Swift - Only the Young lengkap dengan Arti Lirik dan Makna Lagu ke dalam Bahasa Indonesia.

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review 2020-01-01 13:41
A protagonist you’ll love to hate in a book that will make you think hard
Number Eight Crispy Chicken - Sarah Neofield

I am writing this review as a member of Rosie’s Book Review Team (authors, if you’re looking for reviews, I recommend you check her amazing site here), and I thank her and the author for providing me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review. By the way, personalising the ARC copy for the reviewer is a particularly nice touch. Thanks!

I was intrigued by the description, the title (oh, that title), and also the cover of this book. The topic is one that interests me, and I’m sure I’m one among many who have become increasingly alarmed by the situation of asylum seekers all over the world. Although due to my location I’m more familiar with the happenings in the Mediterranean area, this book set in a fictional country (although most readers will reach their own conclusions as to the author’s inspiration for Furtivus, and she openly discusses it on her website) highlights the fact that things are not that different elsewhere (or perhaps that the differences are more cosmetic than substantial).

It’s difficult to discuss the merits of this book separately from its subject. As a politico-social satire, the beauty is in the way it sends up the situation and it pulls up a distorting mirror to the main character, Peter, who is a composite of the worst “qualities” of politicians and public figures whose take on the subject of the asylum seekers’ plight is the hardest of hard-lines and, on top of that, don’t hesitate on personally profiting from the issue (and not only at a political level). I’ve talked before about books whose main character is nasty and despicable, and how reader might find it counterintuitive at first, but in this genre of political satire, this is to be expected. If you’re looking for a book where you can identify and cheer the main character, and you want a hero to follow, please, don’t read this book. Peter is thoroughly dislikeable. The author chooses to tell the story in the third-person, and although at times we are offered an omniscient (observer’s) point of view, which gives us a bit of a break from being inside of Peter’s head (and his rather disgusting body as well) while at the same time clarifying things and giving us an outsiders perspective, most of the time we experience things from Peter’s point of view, and let me tell you, both mentally and physically, it is not a nice place to be.

There are other characters and even one, Jeremy, who is the complete opposite to Peter, and most readers will like, but they don’t play a big part in the story, and although in the case of Jeremy, he is there to show that other options and points of view exist, for the most part we don’t know them in their own right, as true people, but only as obstacles or points of friction for Peter, and that is at it should be, because it reflects perfectly the policies the real-life counterparts of the protagonist formulate and/or adhere to. Only this time he is not in charge, and he does not like it one little bit.

There is a fair amount of telling in the book (the character is forever running his schemes in his mind, feeling self-important and thinking about his “achievements”, and later on, feeling sorry for himself); the author is wonderfully descriptive when it comes to explaining what is happening in Peter’s body, how he sees things, and there are many moments when the books is almost cinematic (oh, the dreaded red buttons, and the feel of his clothes as they degenerate over 24 hours). Peter is a man who judges others by their appearance, and he is very fastidious when we meet him, moaning at everything that is not right to his liking. Self-centred doesn’t quite capture the degree of his egotism, and the little bits of personal information we gather from his rambling mind do nothing to justify his inflated sense of ego.

The plot of the story is simple, and it is clearly explained in the description. Imagine what would happen if somebody who is responsible for making decisions about the refugee policy in a country (and let’s say his policies are less than generous and welcoming), ended up detained at an airport in a foreign country who does not recognise his status, does not accept his money, does not speak his language (or barely), and, basically, does not care an iota about him and does not see him as a person but as a nuisance repeatedly trying to get into the country uninvited. If you think that sounds like he’s got his comeuppance, well, you’d be right, and if you, like me, think that going through a bureaucratic Kafkian nightmare must be hell, I’d recommend you read this book.

The book is not a page-turner in the usual sense. There are many moments in the book when time drags for Peter, and Neofield makes this experience vivid to the reader. Many things happen in the book, but a lot of it is also spent waiting for the nightmare to end. Let me tell you that I loved the ending, that although understated, I thought was perfect.

The novel is full of quotable moments, but one of my favourites must be a conversation when Peter is trying to explain to the security guards (and it’s not his first encounter with the woman in charge) the nature of the blueprints he carries. The fragment is too long to share in its totality, but I thought I’d give you a taster of it, and also of the reply of the guard (whom I love).

‘It’s our Offshore Processing Centre.’

‘What that?’

‘It’s where illegal immigrants-‘

‘You mean refugee?’

‘No, boat people. Queue jumpers.’

The guard’s English was even poorer than Peter had realised, if he had to explain the difference. ‘It’s where they are held for processing.’

‘You process their claim?’

‘Well, not exactly-‘

‘What you do?’

‘Mainly we just hold them there.’

‘Ah, yes. We had also. Long time ago. Concentration camp. This electric fence, no?’

‘No, no. It’s a Courtesy Fence. And it’s not a camp. It’s a Concentration Centre. I mean, Detention Centre. I mean, Processing Centre.’

The conversation carries on for a while, but I had to share the guard’s summing up of her understanding of the situation (after she tells him he must have taken drugs because of the type of things he is saying):

‘Then why you talk crazy? This,’ she said, pointing back at the plans, ‘is not a picture of house. Is tent. This,’ she rolled up the blueprint and slammed it on the desk, ‘is not process centre if you no process. And four year is not ‘temporary’.’

Be this a warning to all spin doctors.

The novel’s description already mentions some writers that might come to mind on reading this book. As a political satire, Swift comes to mind, and I must say that the main character and some of his problems reminded me of the protagonist of Ian McEwan Solar, at least in the early part of the book. And the fixation of the character with his belongings reminded me as well of Bret Easton Ellis’s American Psycho. But you can read it and make up your own mind about it. I recommend it to people interested in the subject of the politics of immigration and seeking asylum in many Western countries, especially if looking for a critical and analytical take on it, which is at the same time sharply and painfully funny and entertaining. You’ll love to hate Peter, and the book is particularly suitable for book clubs, as there is much to discuss and mull over, both in the book itself and in the subject it deals with. The author even offers a guide for readers belonging to book clubs and shares some of the sources she used as an inspiration, and you can access them here. I don’t know what the author plans to write in the future, but I’ll be keeping a close eye on her, and I hope plenty of people read this book, and it makes them think.

 

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