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text 2018-04-11 12:23
CTO Mailing Lists | CTO Mailing Users Lists | CTO Mailing Addresses | Datacaptive

                          Chief Technology Officer (CTO) also known as the Chief Technical Officer, is an executive-level officer in an organization. He undertakes all the affairs of a company related to technology.As the technology is rapidly evolving,so is the role of Chief technology officerThis makes CTO mailing lists vital for marketers . In order to reach top CTOs across the world, we at DataCaptive provide you authentic and reliable CTO mailing list.Our CTO mailing lists help marketers to abridge communication between them and CTOs.

 

About Us:

 

We at DataCaptive built the CTO mailing lists by getting information from reliable sources like public notes, websites, trade shows, etc.

Our CTO mailing list ensures you of validated and authentic data.

 This guarantees you of having a nominal number of undelivered emails and bounced emails.

CTO or Chief Technology Officer is a Corporate executive responsible for looking into scientific and technological issues occurring in an organization

Communicating with the top CTOs and hence build a Solid network.

 

 

We Provide Us:

  • Data Appending
  • Data Verification
  • Data Validation
  • Data Cleansing

Verified Email Lists Around

All Industries

 

Why us?

⇨ Sales and Marketing Leads

 that convert

⇨ Accurate prospect data to engage with leads

⇨ Cut down on Marketing costs with high conversion rates

⇨ Merge your Marketing and

 Sales Funnel

 

Get Verified Samples of Business Email Lists

 

Contact Us:  +1 (800) 523–1387

Email us:  connect@datacaptive.com

Address:  2880 Zanker Rd #203, San Jose, CA 95134

For More Information

Reach Us : https://www.datacaptive.com

 

 

 

Source: www.datacaptive.com/c-level-executives-list/cto-email-and-mailing-list
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text 2018-04-11 07:04
CFO Email List | CFO Mailing List | CFO Email Database | Chief Financial Officer Email List | Datacaptive

Chief Financial Officers are the vital officials in an organization.A Chief Financial Officer manages the finances of a company by tracking cash flow, analyzing deficiencies, and taking decisive actions, and marketers, by directly approaching them, can bring in revenue and develop high value business relationships.Chief Financial Officer’s role has evolved to include not only financial business analysis and risk mitigation but also key decision making and aiding other C- level executives

 

DataCaptive’s CFO Mailing lists are an up to date repository of Chief Financial Officers that save your organization valuable time and money by connecting salespersons to top rung financial decision makers. Prospecting involves conducting extensive research on buyer persona to identify potential customers and with DataCaptive’s accurate mailing lists of CFOs, your organization can rest assured that the prospects identified are capable of taking business decisions and generating revenue.

 

Getting access to accurate Chief Financial Officer Email lists is the first and most crucial step in the process. However, this task is easier said than done, as these contact details seem to be either exclusive or incorrect. DataCaptive’s Chief Financial Officer Contact list has contacts that are carefully screened after being collected from various sources and have gone through various cleansing, integration, and validation processes. Your organization’s sales teams can now focus on closing high value deals instead of following up on inaccurate and obsolete contacts.

 

We Provide Us:

  • Data Appending
  • Data Verification
  • Data Validation
  • Data Cleansing

Verified Email Lists Around

All Industries

 

Why us?

⇨ Sales and Marketing Leads that convert

⇨ Accurate prospect data to engage with leads

⇨ Cut down on Marketing costs with high conversion rates

⇨ Merge your Marketing and Sales Funnel

 

Get Verified Samples of Business Email Lists

Contact Us: +1 (800) 523–1387

Email us: connect@datacaptive.com

Address: 2880 Zanker Rd #203, San Jose, CA 95134

For More Information

Reach Us : https://www.datacaptive.com

 

 

Source: www.datacaptive.com/c-level-executives-list/cfo-email-and-mailing-list
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review 2018-04-07 08:09
Girl Code: Gaming, Going Viral, and Getting It Done
Girl Code: Gaming, Going Viral, and Getting It Done - Andrea Gonzales,Sophie Houser

That was a pretty interesting read, and an encouraging one, in a world where encouraging girls to go into technical careers is still not such a given (yes, even in 2018).

Also, bonus points for introduction to Python at the end, with a few examples of short, easy programs you can try. The only coding I've done so far was with Scratch, and I'm not very familiar with Python apart from a short foray with Ren'Py, but this basic syntax was very easy to get. I like that the authors chose something 'simple': I believe it won't look discouraging to someone who knows nothing to coding.

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review 2018-04-03 15:25
The long history of "tomorrow's car"
The Electric Vehicle: Technology and Expectations in the Automobile Age - Gijs Mom

The relative novelty of the electric vehicle today can obscure the fact that it has a history dating back to the beginnings of the automobile itself. For while most people still drive cars and trucks fueled by gasoline, electricity was a motive power adopted by quite a few vehicle manufacturers in Europe and America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In this book, Gijs Mom explores issues of technology, infrastructure, and consumer culture to explain why it was that electric vehicles failed to become the dominant vehicle type in the early years of automobile development.

Mom divides the history of the electric vehicle into three "generations." In the first, which spanned from 1881 until 1902, automobiles were primarily toys of the wealthy and the enthusiast. The technological limitations facing electric cars — the limited rage and lack of places to replenish their motive energy — were shared by their gasoline and steam-powered counterparts. While gasoline-powered vehicles began developing an advantage in range by the end of this period, the zero emissions and overall cleanliness of electric vehicles still made electric cars a preferred option for many drivers in cities, where distance driving was less of an issue.

By the beginning of the 20th century, a consensus had formed that poor battery performance was the main constraint holding back the development of the electric vehicle. During the second generation, which Mom dates from 1902 until the mid-1920s, improved battery designs helped to address this by improving their capacity. Electric cars continued to enjoy a place in the automotive market, particularly for urban fleet usage, the well-to-do, and women. The key appeal for the latter group was the ease of starting electric vehicles, which did not require the physically demanding cranking required of early gas-powered vehicles. It was the adoption of the electric starter by the early 1920s (in essence, the partial "electrification" of the gasoline-powered vehicle) which Mom sees as cementing the dominance of the gasoline vehicle, though he notes the persistence of electric vehicle usage for some organizations well into the post-World War II era, long before the late-20th century revival of interest in electric vehicles asserted itself.

Mom's history of the electric vehicle is a fascinating study of the factors at play in the adoption of technology, in this case one the ramifications of which are still being addressed today. Though his prose is painstaking and occasionally burdened with conceptual jargon, his assiduous research and detailed analysis provides a well-reasoned explanation for the early failure of electric cars to become the dominant automotive technology. With its account of technological cul-de-sacs and cultural headwinds, readers will find within its pages a story with some echoes of the issues facing electric vehicles today, one that gives a new meaning to Faulkner's adage about the past not being dead or even past. For this reason alone it deserves a wide audience among everyone interested in its subject.

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review 2018-04-02 17:07
The politics of international communications networks
The Invisible Weapon: Telecommunications and International Politics, 1851-1945 - Daniel R. Headrick

As technology has increased the speed of communications over the past two centuries, so too has it increased its importance to governments.  With knowledge being power, governments have sought to capitalize on the increasing rapidity and accessibility of communications, both for advancing their own control and to limit the power and influence of their adversaries.  This is something that Daniel Headrick clearly demonstrates in this book, which examines the political aspects of the emergence of the global communications network in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

 

Headrick begins by examining the emergence of the first technology to make rapid communication over long distances possible – the electric telegraph.  While developing internal networks was relatively easy, communications over long distances was politically risky, as messages could be intercepted and disrupted on lines that crossed hostile territory.  Security thus became an issue early in global communications, one that could only be guaranteed by submarine cables, which gave their owner direct contact with possessions half a world away.  The leader in the effort to establish an international network was Great Britain; though most Western governments seized on telegraphy in the second half of the nineteenth century, only the British had capital markets large enough both to fund the often expensive projects and to absorb their often considerable loss.

 

By the start of the twentieth century, a rapid communications network spanned the globe, one that served as a tool of national power and security.  Yet as Headrick notes, it also fueled international insecurity.  He sees the quickening pace of communications as a factor in the growing international tensions that plagued the world in the first decade of the new century, as the speed of events overtook the ability of diplomats (who were used to a much more gradual course that gave them time in which to operate) to respond effectively.  During the war, the British demonstrated the power granted by their control of the telegraph network, as they cut the Germans off from easy contact with other regions, especially America.  This gave Britain a vital edge in shaping the interpretation of the conflict, one that helped swing the United States firmly into their camp.

 

Yet as vital an advantage communications control was, it was a reflection of British power at its zenith.  Even before the start of the war, radio threatened to break the British monopoly on telegraphy.  Moreover, by the end of the war the British faced a rival of even greater wealth: the United States, which used the new technology to erode Britain’s dominance in telecommunications.  The adoption of shortwave in the 1920s ended British hegemony, while the Second World War saw the British bequeath their position as the dominant power in global communications to the United States, during a conflict in which communications played a decisive role in the Allied victory over the Axis powers.

 

If there is a complaint to be lodged against this generally excellent book, it is that while Headrick does a great job of explaining the impact of telecommunications during the world wars, he rarely demonstrates how telecommunications facilitated political control in peacetime.  It would have been insightful to examine episodes from the early years of telecommunications revealed its power and how such examples altered views towards the burgeoning new technology.  Yet this is a minor quibble.  Well researched and clearly written, Headrick offers a great introduction to the development of the global telecommunications network in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and its role in international politics, one that should be read by anyone seeking to understand the role of technology in shaping political power.

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