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text 2017-02-09 17:43
The Iron King (Iron Fey #1) by Julie Kagawa
The Iron King - Julie Kagawa

"Meghan Chase has a secret destiny; one she could never have imagined.

 

Something has always felt slightly off in Meghan's life, ever since her father disappeared before her eyes when she was six. She has never quite fit in at school or at home.

When a dark stranger begins watching her from afar, and her prankster best friend becomes strangely protective of her, Meghan senses that everything she's known is about to change.

But she could never have guessed the truth - that she is the daughter of a mythical faery king and is a pawn in a deadly war. Now Meghan will learn just how far she'll go to save someone she cares about, to stop a mysterious evil, no faery creature dare face; and to find love with a young prince who might rather see her dead than let her touch his icy heart." Goodreads

 

This book is what you can call a typical faery book. To be honest, you will probably find a lot of the different elements that makes up this book familiar already. Summer court? Check. Winter court? Check. Characters from classical literature, namely Shakespeare? Check. We have them all - Titania, Oberon and not to forget: Robin Goodfellow/Puck. Mind you, this Puck doesn't bear a lot of resemblance to the Puck we're used to.

 

I never managed to fall in love with this book, even though I wanted to. Mainly because of Meghan Chase herself. The time-span of this book is somewhat confusing, and our main character makes a lot of weird, or even stupid, choices. I guess it's fair to say I'm not a huge fan of the main character, but the friends and enemies she gains along the way is a lot more interesting. Want a hint? Ash. Wow. Now that's a character to pay attention to.

 

The world building in this book is..Extensive. You'll probably discover the never ending descriptions of fantastic creatures that Meghan meets on her way. Loads of them. Thankfully, the author takes a break from that from time to time, throwing in some pretty hilarious dialogues, often involving Puck.

 

“Ladies and Felines," he stated grandly, grasping the doorknob, "Welcome to Tir Na Nog. Land of endless winter and shitloads of snow.”

 

I ended up giving this book 3/5 stars. It's an okay book (maybe I've grown too old to put up with the idiocy of a wannabe heroic main character?), but like I said, I didn't really fall in love with it.

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review 2017-01-19 19:29
The Iron King (The Accursed Kings #1)- Maurice Druon
The Iron King - Maurice Druon
I found this novel to be a little disappointing. It seems to come so highly recommended by people who have similar reading tastes and habits to mine. There was very little action for a novel that is said to have inspired Game of Thrones. This first novel seems to be more of a scene setter than anything else. There's nothing wrong with that. I think it does a wonderful job setting the stage and introducing the reader to France at the beginning of the 14th century. However, there just was not a whole lot going on. I'm hopeful that with the impending 100 Years' War, things will pick up in the following novels.
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text 2016-09-29 17:39
Eleanor and the Iron King By Julie Daines 99 cents
Eleanor and the Iron King - Julie Daines

Eleanor de Lacy has been bartered: her hand in marriage in exchange for a truce with her father's sworn enemy. Now the headstrong beauty must leave her ancestral home and the man she secretly loves to become the wife of the infamous Welsh King Brach Goch. Tales of this cruel leader paint a chilling picture of a ruthless warrior—all Eleanor knows for certain is that he is the villain responsible for the vicious attacks on her people and the death of her beloved brother. Though she must marry against her will, she vows Brach Goch will never possess her heart.


Her arrival at the inhospitable castle Bryn Du confirms her worst fears—a ghost walks the halls of the castle, and Eleanor receives an ominous warning from the uneasy spirit: Brach is not to be trusted. Though resigned to a life of misery, Eleanor soon realizes all is not as it seems, for Brach is not the monster she dreaded but is a handsome and charming man whose gentle ways soon undermine his bride's resolve to lock her heart. Clinging desperately to her pride, Eleanor finds herself trapped in a web of murder and deceit. And as the lines between good and evil become blurred, Eleanor must decide for herself who is to be trusted—and loved.

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review 2016-04-27 22:16
Book Review of The Iron King (The Iron Fey, Book 1) by Julie Kagawa
The Iron King - Julie Kagawa

MEGHAN CHASE HAS A SECRET DESTINY—ONE SHE COULD NEVER HAVE IMAGINED…

 

Something has always felt slightly off in Meghan's life, ever since her father disappeared before her eyes when she was six. She has never quite fit in at school…or at home.

When a dark stranger begins watching her from afar and her prankster best friend becomes strangely protective of her, Meghan senses that everything she's known is about to change. But she could never have guessed the truth.

 

For Meghan is the daughter of a mythical faery king…and a pawn in a deadly war. Now Meghan will learn just how far she'll go to save someone she cares about, stop a mysterious evil no faery creature dare face…and find love with a young prince who might rather see her dead than let her touch his icy heart.

 

Review 5*

 

This is the first book in The Iron Fey series. I absolutely loved it!

 

Meghan Chase is a wonderful character. I really liked her. She's a typical sixteen year old, full of angst and a bit of a tom boy. However, all is not what it seems and when her four year old brother gets kidnapped, she finds herself on a deadly mission to rescue him. Along the way, she finds out that she's not a normal teen after all. She's the daughter to Oberon, the Faery King of the Seelie court of Summer.

 

I have been in a reading slump for a while and have struggled to find a book with which to fall in love with reading again. Browsing through my bookshelf, looking for inspiration, I saw this book that I had swapped in a book club but never had a chance to read. I decided to try it and I am glad I did, because I haven't been so excited about a book for quite some time.

 

I started to read this book and I got so caught up in the tale that I forgot that I was sitting in my lounge! This story captured my imagination and held me enthralled right up until the end.

 

As the story unfolds we get to meet Meghan's brother, Ethan whom I absolutely adore. He's cute and reminded me of my nephews' at that age. Robbie Goodfell is Meghan's best friend and is a bit of a clown, but he's also hiding a secret. He's not exactly human and is known as Robin Goodfellow or Puck to those in Faery. I really liked this character. He is the witty, outspoken mischief maker of the Summer faery court and has been appointed by Oberon to keep an eye on Meghan.
We are also introduced to a Cait Sith called Grimalkin, who reminds me a little of The Cheshire Cat in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass, and to Prince Ash, the third son of Queen Mab of the Unseelie court of Winter. I wasn't too sure if I would like Ash at first, but I would have to say that I fell for him myself. He's a complex character, with a depth to him that I enjoyed getting to know. I know it sounds weird, but I also enjoyed his and Puck's feud. Although they clashed physically in fights, there was a respect and deep friendship hidden amongst the heartbreak caused by a tragic accident.

 

I fell in love with this story as it is full of action, adventure and danger, as well as romance. Meghan goes on an amazingly dangerous journey that will test her strength and determination to the fullest. It is a coming of age story that left me breathless in it's complexity. The descriptions of the faery world and creatures living within it were vivid and felt real. As I sat reading, I could picture every scene in my mind's eye with ease. The way the author has incorporated the myths of the Summer and Winter faery courts with modern technology to create a whole new court under the rule of The Iron King intrigues me. In our modern day lives, we use technology for everything. If the land of faery was made from peoples hopes, dreams and fears in olden times, then the technology we use today would definitely have an impact on it. The author explores this concept with frightening detail. The only thing I was worried about in this book was a love triangle, as I am not overly fond of those. However, I needn't have worried. Some readers have become fans of Puck and others Ash. I must admit that I fall into the Ash camp. But Puck is an intriguing character too, though his mischievous nature makes him a little irresponsible at times.

 

I reached the end of the book and thought "Wow, what a ride!". I am now looking forward to reading the next book, The Iron Daughter as soon as possible.

 

Julie Kagawa has written a fantastic Young Adult series. I love her writing style, which is fast paced and exciting. The flow was also wonderful, as each scene moved effortlessly into the next. There may have been a few continuity issues, but it didn't affect my enjoyment. This is the first book I have read by this author, but she has found a fan in me and I will definitely be reading more of her books in the future.

 

Although there are no scenes of a sensual nature, there are scenes that are violent or a little gory. Therefore, I do not recommend this to readers under 15. However, I highly recommend this book if you love YA fantasy or paranormal romances. - Lynn Worton

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review 2016-03-01 00:12
feels derivative and uninspired
The Iron King - Julie Kagawa

Ok, I know this book has seriously devoted followers, but for me it fell flat.  Of course, Twilight also has seriously devoted followers, so following isn't always a good judge of if I'll like it.

 

The Iron King feels to me as if someone who adores fairy tales went "you know what The Labyrinth needs?  A love triangle.  And Sarah is not nearly enough of a special snowflake, I totally need to fix that."

 

The feel honestly comes across as almost middle reader to me, except for the bits which are written to showcase the decadence and debasement of the fae.  The groping and sexuality is aimed at tween and teens, but the writing reminds me of the sorts of descriptions I used to come up with when I was a tween and trying to write like an adult (this scene is totally sexy and dangerous... really!).

 

Had I discovered this when I was a tween, I might have been a believer.  As an adult, I'll go back to Seanan McGuire, or even reread Elizabeth Bear's Promethean Age novels.

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