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Search tags: first-things-first
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text 2018-04-19 01:10
Just starting for Bookshelf BINGO
Dead Things (Eric Carter #1) - Stephen Blackmoore

Today's call is shelved as Necromanvers.

 

New to me author and first in series.  Some reviewers say remniscient of Harry Dresden (I can take it or leave it when it comes to Dresden Files so we'll see).

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review 2018-04-17 08:36
CONCRETE PLANET by Robert Courland
Concrete Planet: The Strange and Fascinating Story of the World's Most Common Man-Made Material - Robert Courland

TITLE:  Concrete Planet:  The Strange and Fascinating Story

             of the World's Most Common Man-Made Material

 

AUTHOR:  Robert Courland

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2011

 

FORMAT:  ebook

 

ISBN-13:  978-1-61614-482-1

_______________________________________

 

From the blurb:

"Concrete: We use it for our buildings, bridges, dams, and roads. We walk on it, drive on it, and many of us live and work within its walls. But very few of us know what it is. We take for granted this ubiquitous substance, which both literally and figuratively comprises much of modern civilization’s constructed environment; yet the story of its creation and development features a cast of fascinating characters and remarkable historical episodes. This book delves into this history, opening readers’ eyes at every turn.

In a lively narrative peppered with intriguing details, author Robert Corland describes how some of the most famous personalities of history became involved in the development and use of concrete—including King Herod the Great of Judea, the Roman emperor Hadrian, Thomas Edison (who once owned the largest concrete cement plant in the world), and architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Courland points to recent archaeological evidence suggesting that the discovery of concrete directly led to the Neolithic Revolution and the rise of the earliest civilizations. Much later, the Romans reached extraordinarily high standards for concrete production, showcasing their achievement in iconic buildings like the Coliseum and the Pantheon. Amazingly, with the fall of the Roman Empire, the secrets of concrete manufacturing were lost for over a millennium.

The author explains that when concrete was rediscovered in the late eighteenth century it was initially viewed as an interesting novelty or, at best, a specialized building material suitable only for a narrow range of applications. It was only toward the end of the nineteenth century that the use of concrete exploded. During this rapid expansion, industry lobbyists tried to disguise the fact that modern concrete had certain defects and critical shortcomings. It is now recognized that modern concrete, unlike its Roman predecessor, gradually disintegrates with age. Compounding this problem is another distressing fact: the manufacture of concrete cement is a major contributor to global warming.

Concrete Planet is filled with incredible stories, fascinating characters, surprising facts, and an array of intriguing insights into the building material that forms the basis of the infrastructure on which we depend."

 

There isn't much to say about this book that hasn't already been mentioned in the blurb.  The book is a well-written, accessible and enjoyable history of concrete and some of the structures built with it.  I did feel the history of concrete in the 20th century dealt more with the people involved than what the concrete was actually used for.   It would also have been nice if the author had inserted chemical equations etc - at least as an appendix - but otherwise it's an informative book about the subject matter.

 

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quote 2018-04-10 06:45
“If you already know the answer, why are you trying to make me say it?"

"Because I'm a girl, and that's what we do.”
Things Liars Say: a Novella (#ThreeLittleLies Book 1) - Sara Hassinger Ney

~~ Sara Ney, Things Liars Say

(Three Little Lies #1)

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review 2018-04-09 14:18
I liked it.
The Devil In Disguise (Bad Things Book 1) - Cynthia Eden

It was well enough written, that I could consume it in one go, the protags were not annoying and it had solid world-building.

 

It was a bit too sappy and heroic for my taste, especially given that the male protag was supposed to be this big baddie. And turned out to be a big softie.

 

It was a good read, but I don't think I will follow the series.

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review 2018-04-06 01:35
Things Fall Apart Review
Things Fall Apart - Chinua Achebe

After reading the book Things Fall Apart I thought that it was educational and was a worth while read. I like how the book explained the background of African culture and rituals that takes place in the book. Particularly, I liked how the kola nut was talked about. I learned that guests in one's household would "have the honor of breaking the kola" (pg.6). I thought it was a worth while read because it gave me a different on Africa and the day to day basis of what they do. This book was explained and depicted in a grasping way. Reading this book was definitely helpful and I would recommend others to come along this journey of an amazing story. 

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