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Search tags: To-read-have-bought
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text 2018-09-15 20:22
Reading progress: 2%.
The Black Company - Glen Cook

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text 2017-08-15 17:51
Looks interesting ...
Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain - Maryanne Wolf

An older book but new to me (Barnes and Noble Readouts mention reminded me).  Synopsis from publisher page for Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain:

 

"Human beings were never born to read," writes Tufts University cognitive neuroscientist and child development expert Maryanne Wolf. Reading is a human invention that reflects how the brain rearranges itself to learn something new. In this ambitious, provocative book, Wolf chronicles the remarkable journey of the reading brain not only over the past five thousand years, since writing began, but also over the course of a single child's life, showing in the process why children with dyslexia have reading difficulties and singular gifts.

 

Lively, erudite, and rich with examples, Proust and the Squid asserts that the brain that examined the tiny clay tablets of the Sumerians was a very different brain from the one that is immersed in today's technology-driven literacy. The potential transformations in this changed reading brain, Wolf argues, have profound implications for every child and for the intellectual development of our species.

 

Critical Praise :

 

“[Maryanne Wolf] displays extraordinary passion and perceptiveness concerning the reading brain, its miraculous achievements and tragic dysfunctions.” — BookForum

 

“Everything Wolf says makes sense....She clearly knows her stuff.” — Washington Post Book World

 

“Brilliant and eye-opening.” — Albany Times Union

 

“...intriguing...” — New Scientist

 

“Fascinating....Wolf restores our awe of the human brain.” — Associated Press

 

“[Wolf’s] conversational style, reflective comments and insights from work with children...create a narrative flow and bright tone.” — Minneapolis Star Tribune

 

“The squid of Wolf’s title represents the neurobiological approach to the study of reading....Given the panic that takes hold of humanists when the decline of reading is discussed, her cold-blooded perspective is opportune.” — The New Yorker

 

“A book worth talking about.” — U.S. News & World Report

 

“Enjoyable....Wolf, with remarkable agility in a relatively compact book (intended for both aficionados and the uninitiated), transitions seamlessly between disciplines as diverse as linguistics, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and archeology, among others. Her voice comes through clearly; she is fascinated by reading and shares that energy.” — New England Journal of Medicine

 

“Wolf’s alarm about the spread of semi- literacy among the young is obviously justified, and her book provokes thought about it as only reading can.” — Sunday Times (London)

 

“This humane and fascinating book...is a paean to what Proust, über-reader, called ‘that fruitful miracle of a communication in the midst of solitude,’ to all that has been and can be achieved for individuals and for mankind through literacy.” — The Evening Standard (London)

 

“Blindingly fascinating...detailed and scholarly....There’s a lot of difficult material in here. But it’s worth the effort....For people interested in language, this is a must. You’ll find yourself focusing on words in new ways. Read it slowly--it will take time to sink in.” — The Sunday Telegraph

 

“Proust and the Squid is an inspiring celebration of the science of reading....Wolf’s insights are fascinating....Proust and the Squid has much to offer on this important--perhaps the most important--subject” — The Guardian (London)

Source: www.harpercollins.com/9780062010636/proust-and-the-squid
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url 2017-06-11 21:28
Free for kindle via booklikes daily deals
The Book of Tea - Kakuzō Okakura

A random find on opening page of booklikes Daily Deals.  

 

This one is available lots of places free (public domain, out of copyright).  But just noticed it and convenient to put it on my kindle while this edition is free.

 

UPDATED: I just had to keep browsing.  So also got this superhero origin story:  

 

Being Jamie Baker - Kelly Oram  Being Jamie Baker - Kelly Oram  

 

I broke my own rule about ya books with half a girl's face on the cover because says it's a superhero origin story. Could be a bad book not ready to publish, could be too full of teenage angst, or could be a great superhero story — but, I downloaded it anyway.

 

More freebies at http://booklikes.com/dailydeals/free .  

 

More deals at http://booklikes.com/dailydeals/discounted .

Source: www.amazon.com/Book-Tea-Kakuzo-Okakura-ebook/dp/B000JQUVMC?SubscriptionId=AKIAJ3XCC7GLJWZDXC2A&tag=book0dc0-20&linkCode=sp1&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B000JQUVMC
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text 2017-04-23 20:09
Freebie that was recommended
Graveyard Shift - Angela Roquet

Just downloaded this first book (with more of series already published) based on a friend's recommendation.  Currently free for kindle.

 

Sounds like I'll like the main character if the story isn't too much like too many other UF/PNR books.

 

Synopsis reads:

"The Inferno has Evolved… Lana Harvey is a reaper, and a lousy one at that.

 

She resides in Limbo City, the modern capital of the collective afterlives, where she likes to stick it to the man (the legendary Grim Reaper himself) by harvesting the bare minimum of souls required of her. She’d much rather be hanging out with Gabriel, her favorite archangel, at Purgatory Lounge.

 

But when a shocking promotion falls in her lap, Lana learns something that could unravel the very fabric of Eternity. If the job isn’t completed, there could be some real hell to pay."

 

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text 2017-04-04 01:02
Reading progress: 10%.
Rebel Flight - Mindy Klasky

The antitheses of those horrid books I avoid where someone has to sacrifice a beloved pet or familiar as part of their training.  The ones I DNF.

 

Looking forward to this one (a fave author).  So far, an air of Witches in Red or Uprooted -- maybe just because starts in a village.  Was published before (but I missed it somehow).

 

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