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Search tags: Tuck-Everlasting
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review 2016-11-11 23:27
Tuck Everlasting - Natalie Babbitt

Time drags by for Winnie Foster, an eleven-year-old girl who lives in a house bordering the woods owned by her family. Winnie spends her summer days under the watchful eye of her grandmother. Most of the time it's too hot to be out in the sun, and when Winnie does actually venture outside, she never goes beyond the fence of the yard. But one morning she sneaks away into the woods and there she sees a young man drinking from a mysterious spring of water he uncovers at the base of tree. The young man, Jesse Tuck, discovers Winnie watching him. So he kidnaps her.

Actually, the entire Tuck family — Mae and Pa and Jesse's brother Miles — kidnap Winnie. They have to keep the spring that Winnie has seen a secret, because the strange water there makes anyone who drinks from it live forever. Long ago the Tucks unknowingly drank from the spring, and now the four of them are over 500 years old. They have come to learn that immortality is not a blessing but a curse. Winnie is won over by the kind family. But she's not the only one who knows their secret. A man wanting to buy the well and make it famous has been watching the Tucks all along, and the only way to stop him is to take away the life he so wants to make last forever. Soon, Winnie must help her new friends escape from the police; she must break every rule that she knows, to insure that the most important rule in life — death — is not broken by everyone else. While I have never read this book I plan on reading it to one day be able to use it in my future classroom. I would use this story in a 5th-6th grade classroom to explain the cycle of life to the students. In the story they thought drinking the water would be a good thing, but they quickly realized this did nothing but make things worse. I would also use this book to remind students that things are not always as good as they appear to be.

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review 2016-11-10 22:58
Tuck Everlasting
Tuck Everlasting - Natalie Babbitt

Tuck Everlasting is a really beautiful fantasy book, taking place in the late 1800's. I think it is a really good book to read with 4th graders. It is not a long read. You could use it as whole group reading in my opinion. 

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review 2016-11-10 19:49
Tuck Everlasting - Natalie Babbitt

Tuck Everlasting is the perfect book for fifth grade students.  It is provides an excellent source to teach new vocabulary.  Further, this book provides a clear examples to teach all the elements of plot and inference.   

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review 2016-09-30 16:14
Tuck Everlasting review
Tuck Everlasting - Natalie Babbitt

Tuck Everlasting is one of my all time favorite books. This book is filled with adventure, romance, innocence, tough decisions, fighting bad guys, and so much more. This book teaches that the grass is not always greener on the other side and can help teach children to be thankful for their lives no matter the circumstance. I would use this book in fifth grade. The guided reading level is W and the Lexile level is 770L.

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review 2016-06-28 00:00
Tuck Everlasting
Tuck Everlasting - Natalie Babbitt More like 3.5 stars, but I rounded up because it really is a cute little story. The writing flows easily and she writes in such a way that it's easy to conjure up the images she's describing... although that might also be leftover screenshots of the movie I saw many years ago... which I also loved!

I don't know that I agree with the Tucks and the underlying lesson of the story... I mean don't tell me you haven't fantasized about never dying before! Just think of everything you could do! But on the other hand I agree with the message about the wheel of life, about the beauty of nature and it's course. Ultimately, I guess, they're telling you to take the life you've got and live it to the max.
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