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Search tags: Zelazny
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review 2017-07-15 10:40
Flavour of Zelazny
Jack of Shadows - Roger Zelazny

This was an interesting read. It wasn't quite up to the level of his Amber series, but it showed a similar panorama of the bizarre imagination of Roger Zelazny.

 

Jack is a likeable antihero who is a talented thief, not least of all because he is a darksider and can disappear into shadow. Darksiders have multiple lives, but no soul. Death means starting again, but he has to make his way back to the world through an otherworldly realm of the dead where magical beings rule.

 

The story stretches the imagination, as Zelazny tends to do, though being a thing of its time it could get some complaints of misogyny. Not something I'll re-read but a classic to tick off the list.

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text 2017-06-19 17:58
U.S. Kindle Sale: Miscellaneous
The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club - Dorothy L. Sayers
The Golden Compass - Philip Pullman
All Creatures Great and Small, All Things Bright and Beautiful, and All Things Wise and Wonderful: Three James Herriot Classics - James Herriot
Jack of Shadows - Roger Zelazny
And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic - Randy Shilts,William Greider
Silent Spring - Rachel Carson,Linda Lear,Edward O. Wilson
Cheaper by the Dozen - Frank B. Gilbreth Jr.,Ernestine Gilbreth Carey

Currently $1.99: The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club, by Dorothy L. Sayers.  The Golden Compass (aka Northern Lights), The Subtle Knife, and The Amber Spyglass, by Phillip Pullman.  Jack of Shadows, by Roger Zelazny.  Cheaper by the Dozen, by Frank Gilbreth and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey.

 

Currently $2.99: Three James Herriot Classics (All Creatures Great and Small, All Things Bright and Beautiful, and All Things Wise and Wonderful), by James Herriot.  Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh.

 

Currently $3.99: And the Band Played On, by Randy Shilts.  Silent Spring, by Rachel Carson.

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review 2017-05-03 13:23
Measuring humanity
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? - Philip K. Dick,Robert Zelazny

I don't know whether to be hopeful or depressed. I think I'm a good deal of both, plus amazed, and horror stricken. There is a lot of the Sisyphean in this, which I guess is on purpose, given all the Mercer stuff (which on the last pages got trippy as fuck, of the religious hallucination variety).

 

And it makes a good job of running through many questions regarding empathy, psychological manipulation, human's social animal condition, loneliness, plus whatever I didn't get, inside few pages on an action packed day for a bounty-hunter.


Really intense little book.

 

Rachel hates him because he recognized her even while she couldn't recognize herself? (I'm unsure on this, she must have known to sleep with other bounty-hunters) Or maybe she hates him because it's another failure to fool a human, and can't understand where the failing lies.

She goes for the goat. But in the end, maybe his wife was more important. She actually cares and.. well, it felt hopeful to me. No pet, but why should you feel bereft if you can care for another person... which is a bit messed up and might be the reason Deckard is so messed up: HE doesn't care for HER.

Cyborgs are really terrifying because it's clear by the end that they are absolutely psychopathic. The spider makes you understand what the fact that they truly can't empathize really means. All the fripperies that have you in doubt make it even scarier. Of course, you have Irmgand so who knows?

(spoiler show)
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text 2017-05-03 07:48
Reading progress update: I've read 132 out of 244 pages.
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? - Philip K. Dick,Robert Zelazny

Garland explanation, so resigned, and then Regsch's non-stated, but evident though-process as he realizes.


"It's not just false memory structures," Phil Resch said. "I own an animal; not a false one but the real thing. A squirrel. I love the squirrel, Deckard"

 

A dagger to the heart.

 

After Luba: God!! All that conversation!! Resch not understanding the book buying, but worrying about the squirrel, and his despair, it's soul-wrenching!

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text 2017-05-03 06:48
Reading progress update: I've read 110 out of 244 pages.
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? - Philip K. Dick,Robert Zelazny

This is fast becoming a mind-screw.

 

By the way, this is another cult-classic which I haven't watched and mostly avoided being spoiled, so don't tell me.

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