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url 2018-06-07 00:33
Books That Stay With You Forever

Sometimes it so happens, you read a book and your life is changed for good. It doesn't happen often, to some it may never happen, but o those lucky readers who have experienced it know just how exhilarating such experiences are. These books have a power to stay with the readers forever.

I've been reading since I was a kid. I don't remember a time in my life when I wasn't a reader. For me reading is not only the best way to pass time, but also it's my passion. All my life can be defined by the books I read. As I child I loved Enid Blyton and Roald Dahl. As a teenager my favorite books were Sweet Valley High Series and Fear Street Series.Those books used to keep me up all night. In my late teens I started reading classics and simply fell more in love with book. Jane Austen introduced me to the world of romance, while Agatha Christie's murder mysteries kept me hooked for a long, long time.

It is very difficult to say what makes a book exceptional. I think that every reader's experience is unique. No one ever reads the same book, or so the saying goes. Readers' personal experiences matter a lot. For example, the books that have stayed with me through the years include;

1. Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie (I also never wanted to grow up so Peter's character was very close to my heart).

2. Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (because she was lost and I could relate to her).

3. Matilda by Roald Dahl (because in my opinion that book was written about me).

4. Endless Night by Agatha Christie (it shows how misguided in our emotions we can be and how sometimes you do things you regret a lot, but still cannot do anything about it. Losing people through our own actions is a curse that we face from time to time in our lives, it may not be to the extend this story shows, however, it can be a painful experience and you even forgo the right to mourn your loss).

5. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (its simplicity is its beauty).

6. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens (I think this book is the perfect example of disappointments in life, how things are and how we perceive them are not always one and the same, and we must learn to live with everything life through at us).

There are a number of other stories which I can name here. but let's keep it short. From what I can see, one thing that these books have in common are very strong, well-developed, and relatable characters. Not every book has power to hold our attention for a long time. Most of the time we just read to pass time and then forget about the story afterwards. I'm not saying that those books are bad books, they have their purpose, but the best ones will never leave you, and so far I've only seen that quality in classics. I guess that's exactly what make them classics in the first place.

Source: www.bloglovin.com/@bookseater/books-that-stay-with-you-forever
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text 2018-05-05 13:29
A Book Lover's Favorite Position...

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photo 2018-04-19 18:08
The Complete Stories and Poems - Edgar Allan Poe

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore—

 


I’m almost finished reading Fahrenheit 451, and while that little tidbit may seem wholly unrelated, bear with me. As many of you know, books are illegal in Bradbury’s story, but there’s a part when Guy reads a poem to his wife and her friends, and one of her friends starts sobbing without knowing why. They hadn’t felt anything real in so long, if ever - everything that was shoved down their throats was fake happiness they thought they needed. But hearing a poem caused her to cry uncontrollably, and Guy began to doubt that books should ever be brought back to light. That maybe happiness was better, even if it was shallow. Guy seems to be learning his own depths at this point, and his hesitation really struck me. I’ve always found the sorrowful or the tragic to be the most breathtaking. Like Poe, for example. There would never be a moment when I thought that sorrow should be hidden from the world. And I’m so glad that works like Poe’s exist. Could you imagine a world without authors like him? Or ANY authors, for that matter? 


If I’m rambling, I apologize! Fahrenheit 451 is just so provoking and relevant - read it, if you haven’t yet! And PS, HBO is making a new flick of it to be released next month

Source: getfictional.com
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photo 2018-04-15 17:56
It - Stephen King

There's not many things more terrifying that Stephen King's Pennywise. I read IT last October, and per usual, King didn't let me down. His words crept into my nightmares and still reside there today. He's the Creepy King {hehe}, and I couldn't imagine the horror genre without him. 

 

If you want some creepy candles like Pennywise here, I’m having a flash sale! Just visit getfictional.com and use code FRIDAY13 for 13% off today! {customs excluded}. 


Cheers!!

Source: getfictional.com
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review 2017-12-03 16:41
Bookish advent calender: December 1th - December 3th
Classic Ghost Stories: Spooky Tales to Read at Christmas - Various
The Valancourt Book of Victorian Christmas Ghost Stories - Arthur Conan Doyle,Tara Moore,Walter Scott

December 1th: The Open Door by Margaret Oliphant (from Classic Ghost Stories)

 

A story about a father, whose son falls sick after he has encountered something strange in the ruins on their home property, and his subsequent search for the truth behind the encounter.

This short story was an ok one. The parts I enjoyed the most were the nightly trips to the ruins, the juniper bush with a life of its own and the sceptical doctor, who doesn´t believe in superstitious mumbo jumbo. A good and decent story. This will definitely not be my last read by Mrs. Oliphant. 3 Stars.

 

December 2th: They by Rudyard Kipling (from Classic Ghost Stories)

 

This short story has some beautiful writing, even though the prose is too flowery for my taste (do you really need 2,5 pages to tell the reader, that the narrator got lost in the country side? I don´t think so). And I didn´t like the story. 1) There is no suspense at all, because it is clear from the get go what is up with those children and 2) I need someone who explains the ending to me. I didn´t get the ending at all. 1,5 Stars. 

 

December 3th: The Captain of the "Pole-Star" by Arthur Conan Doyle (from The Valancourt Book of Victorian Christmas Ghost Stories and Classic Ghost Stories)

 

I really enjoyed this story and I loved the setting(a whaling ship stuck in the polar region). It´s one of my favorite settings and it works wonderfully in this story. The captain is an intriguing character I would have liked to know more about and Conan Doyle is setting him up in a very mystical way. The fact that the story is told from the point of view of the ships doctor adds to the mystery, since he takes a rational approach to everything that is happening on the ship. A great example of Conan Doyles weird fiction. 4 Stars.    

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