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review 2017-08-19 15:57
Dark Tower: The Drawing of the Three: The Lady of Shadows
Dark Tower: The Drawing of the Three: Lady of Shadows - Peter David,Jonathan Marks,Robin Furth

All I can seem to muster up about this entry is "meh." I'm not crazy about the artwork or the story. 

 

Maybe it's is because I'm also re-reading the books via audio and recently finished The Song of Susanna and I'm just  plain Odetta'd out? I'll admit this is very possible. 

 

I have the next entry in the series on hand and I'll see how it goes with that. 

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review 2017-08-15 08:29
New to me superhero.
Blue Beetle Vol. 1: The More Things Chan... Blue Beetle Vol. 1: The More Things Change (Rebirth) (Blue Beetle (Rebirth)) - Keith Giffen,Scott Kolins

New to me superhero in that I'd heard the name but not read any previous issues.

 

This is a new incarnation of The Blue Beetle, Jamie Reyes, teenager, and he has a scarab beetle-type tech welded to his back. Unfortunately, someone wants it back and it appears it can't be removed without killing him.

Fun in the way a teenage hero should be. Lots of worrying about skipping school to do superhero duty and hanging with friends that know your secret (it's barely a secret, the world and his wife seems to know). Lots of banter between school friends and with his mentor, former Blue Beetle, Ted Kord.


We get his origin in several panels almost at the end of the book rather than a whole issue at the beginning.


The artwork is bright and well drawn. 


Impressed, can't wait to get the next issue.
 

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review 2017-08-13 15:20
The Lost Boys Volume 1 by Tim Seeley
The Lost Boys Vol. 1 - Tim Seeley

 

The Lost Boys Vol. 1 picks up where the movie left off. The Frog brothers are celebrating their victory over David and his gang of vampires but their victory is short-lived. There are new vampires in town and their gang is called the Blood Belles. Will the Frog brothers be able to defeat this new gang in the "murder capital of the world," Santa Carla? You'll have to read this to find out!

 

I enjoyed the nostalgia I felt while reading this. Back in 1987 when the movie came out, it was all the rage. We got two Coreys-Feldman and Haim, not to mention the good looking Jason Patrick. For me though, it was great to see David again,(portrayed by the incredibly hot Kiefer Sutherland in the film), he was always my favorite. I think this volume stayed true to the feel of the original movie and the characters-I was happy about that.

 

 

What I didn't much like was the dialogue and the simplicity of the story line. I understand that this is for fun and nostalgia and all that, but there's no reason that the story can't be more geared to adults. Even though there was some language here, I feel like it was geared more to the person I was back in the 80's, rather than who I am now. Does that make any sense?

 

 

 

I can't complain too much though, because I did enjoy this comic quite a bit. The graphics were dynamic and true to the movie and I loved seeing all these old characters again-(man, I wanted to be Star, [Jamie Gertz]), back then. I had a lot of fun reading this and will continue with the series, if only just for the fun and nostalgia of it.

 

On sale August 15th, here: The Lost Boys Vol. 1

 

 

*Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the e-ARC of this graphic novel in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it.*

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review 2017-08-06 23:41
Cover promises much but the inside fails to deliver.
The Hellblazer Vol. 1: The Poison Truth (Rebirth) - Simon Oliver,Moritat

Collects issue 1 - 6

 

I've not read any Constantine before, so this is my introduction to the character.

 

        FYI. This is the correct cover.

 

Not exactly what I as hoping for. For the most part the story was boring. And just as it started to get more interesting it finished. The magic was pretty much non-existent or so low key as to raise little more than a meh from me. There seemed to be a lot of talking and not a lot of action. Swamp Thing shared a lot of the page time. The author had much to say on the political climate, being anti-Trump, anti-Brexit, and anti-Tory but I found it laid on with a trowel and it just served to make me roll my eyes and pull me out of the story.

 

John Constantine is a chain-smoking, hard-drinking foul-mouthed antihero. And yet all the swear words were censored (apart from one occasion when Swamp Thing referred to JC as a 'total wanker'). I didn't understand the need for this, it diluted the impact of everything else. This is not a child-friendly character, stick a 'parental guidance'  statement on it and let the parents do their job. 

 


Two different artists worked on this volume. The artist for issues 1-4 had a sketchy style with a darker tone and a more rugged, haggard JC. 

 

It probably suited the character better then the artist who pencilled 5 & 6. These had much cleaner lines and was more cartoony in nature. The colouring was brighter and JC seemed more clean cut.

 

 

With an unapologetic bisexual character I was hoping for something more diverse in my reading. Instead we get just one panel that implies his sexuality. And then it was a taunt by a racist, skinhead, bovver boy (cliche, anyone?) 

 

 

I'm hoping his bisexuality will get more positive treatment in future issues.


An okay read but nothing special. Overall a disappointing introduction to what should be a diverse and interesting character.

 

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review 2017-07-30 20:18
The Comic Book Story of Video Games
The Comic Book Story of Video Games: The Incredible History of the Electronic Gaming Revolution - Jonathan Hennessey,Jack Mcgowan

[I received a copy of this book through NetGalley.]

Fairly interesting, although to be honest, in spite of the early chapters being educative in their own ways, I would’ve preferred to see the focus more on the actual video games (and industry) themselves, rather than also on the electricity/industrial revolution parts. The art style, too, was not always consistent, and sometimes too stiff.

On the other hand, I appreciated the inclusion of actual video games characters in panels, as watchers or part of the ‘narrative’; just trying to remember or find out who they were, was in itself another, different dive into history. (Well, maybe it wouldn’t work that well on someone who knows less about such games, but for me, it worked.)

I also liked how the book included some of the backstage workings behind the whole video games industry; they were plenty of things I didn’t know, for instance Sony and its Playstation, I had no idea there had been a deal in the plans with Nintendo for CD games, and that it completely fell through. (I’m not feeling younger, though. Being reminded that this PSX I got in 1998—and I made it a point to get a US model, too, since the European one didn’t run the games I wanted—was even a few years older than that... well...)

Conclusion: An informative and colourful read. I do wish it had spent just a little less time on the really early years, where ‘games’ per se weren’t so much concerned (to be fair, I already know a lot about computer history in general).

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