logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: criticism
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-30 22:45
Bad Feminist: Essays - Roxane Gay

Roxane gay is smart and astute and brave and candid and funny. The writing is accessible, clear, and thoughtful.

 

These essays, which cover a range of topics from racism to what makes an (imperfect) feminist to critiques of books like LEAN IN and movies such as DJANGO, are insightful and thought-provoking. Like the best essays, there's something here to make everyone a little bit uncomfortable, and Gay doesn't spare herself the discomfort either. How kind and clever or her to allow us to admit out own warts and wrinkles in the face of her own admissions of imperfection. Well done.

 

And, on a personal note, how delighted I was to find such a terrific critical essay on the topic of THE HELP, a book I loathed, and for which I have taken a great deal of abuse for loathing. Thanks, Roxane.

 

Reading these essays was like having a long conversation with the smartest and wittiest of friends. Highly recommended.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-04-13 17:56
Reading progress update: I've read 394 out of 517 pages.
Shakespeare and the Goddess of Complete Being - Ted Hughes

Just impatient for this to be over; something prevents me from just abandoning it having got through ~4/5 already.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-04-06 18:29
Anything Goes: "The Cambridge Introduction to Postmodern Fiction" by Bran Nicol
The Cambridge Introduction to Postmodern Fiction - Bran Nicol

Postmodernism scrutinizes the accepted ways of producing art and finds new ways to portray interesting things. Without this approach everyone would still be scratching stick men onto cave walls. In a world in which change happens so fast, it's useful and important to think in terms of what changes, why it changes, and how the change helps or hinders us. Having said that, and in the long run, post modernism is as irrelevant as any other “ism”, all of which had their own junk philosophies to contend with, what matters at the end of the day is the content of art and how society or an individual responds to it that matters. Sadly post modernism could have provoked a radical and revolutionary response to society but its adherents proved conservative, more interested in money and their careers to make any meaningful art. So unlike so many “isms” whose adherents created great works in spite of a particular ism´s junk philosophy, post modernism hasn´t produced many works of literature worth remembering. Postmodernism is not throwing a whole lot of weird stuff together and seeing what craziness happens. This, however, is what a lot of people, including artists, curators, critics, and journalists who all should know better, think it is, This "anything goes" postmodernism is what winds people up and makes them say 'That's not art!' as if there's something which art ought to be.

 

 

If you're into literary criticism, read on.

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-03-23 13:53
Reading progress update: I've read 367 out of 517 pages.
Shakespeare and the Goddess of Complete Being - Ted Hughes Hughes suggests that in most cases the later plays focus on the hero's inner life and not on the heroine's. He points out a few exceptions but doesn't mention Othello, which, it has oft been observed, seems to be dominated by the villain, Iago, rather than the Moor, let alone Desdemona.
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-20 15:21
Cultural Chicken Soup for the Soul:"An Experiment in Criticism" by C. S. Lewis
An Experiment in Criticism (Canto) - C.S. Lewis

Literary experience heals the wound, without undermining the privilege, of individuality. There are mass emotions which heal the wound; but they destroy the privilege. In them our separate selves are pooled and we sink back into sub-individuality. But in reading great literature I become a thousand men and yet remain myself. Like a night sky in the Greek poem, I see with a myriad eyes, but it is still I who see. Here, as in worship, in love, in moral action, and in knowing, I transcend myself; and am never more myself than when I do.

 

In “An Experiment in Criticism” by C. S. Lewis

 

 

Anarcho-punk, extreme literature..... Beware the coming revolution.

 

All the best writers are anarcho-punks:

 

-          JJ Rousseau: A Discourse On Inequality

-          Thomas Payne: The Rights Of Man

-          Mary Wollstonecraft: A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

-          Victor Hugo 'Les Miserables' set in the French Revolution in Paris.

 

Dostoevsky wrote his first novel 'The Poor Folk' aged 29. This resulted in him and his 3 co-radicals being sentenced to death by firing squad in the main public square in St Petersburg by the Tsar who was offended by their revolutionary contents. At the last second the Tsar commuted the punishment to 4 years hard labour in Siberia. Two of the writers went mad from this sadist act, but Dostoevsky kept on writing about being on death row, psychological torture, his time in jail and did so for the rest of his life. Orwell. 'Homage To Catalonia' set in Spanish Revolution in Barcelona where anarchists fight fascists.

 

 

If you're into literary criticism, read on.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?