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review 2018-10-07 13:50
Modern Masters
Legion: An Apocalyptic Horror Novel (Hell on Earth Book 2) - Iain Rob Wright

 

I got sucked into another series.

 

This one is a little repetitive, as most of it is the same story as the previous book except told from a different characters point of view.  Tedious in some cases, like the ship captains, interesting in others, as in the case of Vamps and his buddies.

 

New information is added as well from other characters so it's not a complete re-telling, as well as a GLARING contradiction from Daniel.

 

In book one, unless I'm mis-remembering (which is possible as numbers have a tendency to be floaty unless I wrestle them down and chain them up), there were 6,000 gates scattered across the world.  According to THE SAME GUY, there are 666 to correspond with the Adversaries of God, which have nothing to do with the angels that were banned from heaven. 

 

We'll see if the number changes in book 3.

 

 

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review 2018-10-01 07:42
Growing a Revolution by David R. Montgomery
Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life - David Montgomery

TITLE:  Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life

 

AUTHOR:  David R. Montgomery

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2017

 

FORMAT:  Paperback

 

ISBN-13:  9780393356090

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DESCRIPTION:

"For centuries, agricultural practices have eroded the soil that farming depends on, stripping it of the organic matter vital to its productivity. Now conventional agriculture is threatening disaster for the world’s growing population. In Growing a Revolution, geologist David R. Montgomery travels the world, meeting farmers at the forefront of an agricultural movement to restore soil health. From Kansas to Ghana, he sees why adopting the three tenets of conservation agriculture—ditching the plow, planting cover crops, and growing a diversity of crops—is the solution. When farmers restore fertility to the land, this helps feed the world, cool the planet, reduce pollution, and return profitability to family farms."

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In this book, we follow the author on an investigation of various agricultural methods all over the globe to see what works and which methods rejuvinate depleted soils.  This is a rather pleasant book to read - no doom and gloom.  The author is optimistic about humanity's ability to feed itself provided the methods described in this book are followed.  No fancy technology or equipment is necessary.  It doesn't matter if you are an organic produce farmer or a conventional farmer, farm with animals or plants, have a huge farm in the USA or a small family farm in Africa, the principles described in this book make farming profitable, improve the soil, reduce erosion, retain water, minimize weeds, reduce input costs in terms of fertilizer, herbicide and pesticide.  These principles can in all likelihood be modified to the home garden too.

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review 2018-09-01 19:33
2018 Halloween Bingo TBR ( 2nd book) finished only 3 stars
The Fractured Earth - Matt Hart

 

 

 

Black cauldron : read/ not called

Book The Fractured Earth ( book 1 in a series)

Date:9/1/18

Rating:✴✴✴

Thoughts: it's a bit strange because it has zombies,aliens and humans in it , not sure What I think of it or if I want to get the next book, .

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review 2018-08-26 18:56
Review of An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth
An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth - Chris Hadfield

I really enjoyed this book that was part memoir and part practical advice on how to approach life and work.  I loved the stories about his time in space and the preparation that goes into it.  I also appreciated his advice about living in the moment and being prepared for every potentiality in life.  His stress on tackling one problem at at time (the classic checklist for astronauts) certainly applies in our day to day lives.  Finally, I also loved Hadfield's stress on trying to really love everything you do.  Nothing here that is revolutionary, but you can't help but appreciate the life and the love of life Hadfield has.

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review 2018-08-22 11:29
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Journey to the Centre of the Earth (Oxford World's Classics) - William Butcher,Jules Verne

TITLE:  Journey to the Centre of the Earth

 

AUTHOR:  Jules Verne

 

TRANSLATOR:  William Butcher

 

EDITION:  Oxford World's Classics

 

DATE OF PUBLICATION:  2008 (reissue)

 

FORMAT:  Paperback

 

ISBN-13:  9780199538072

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Description:

 

"Now available in a new translation, this classic of nineteenth century French literature has been consistently praised for its style and its vision of the world. Professor Lidenbrock and his nephew Axel travel across Iceland, and then down through an extinct crater toward a sunless sea where they enter a living past and are confronted with the origins of man. Exploring the prehistory of the globe, this novel can also be read as a psychological quest, for the journey itself is as important as arrival or discovery. Verne's distinctive combination of realism and Romanticism has marked figures as diverse as Sartre and Tournier, Mark Twain and Conan Doyle."

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Journey to the Centre of the Earth is an exciting adventure story that is well plotted and fast paced with interesting characters.  This book revolves around the (sometimes nail-biting) subterreanean adventures of the excitable Professor Lidenbrock (who reminds me of the overly-energetic Alexander von Humboldt), his nephew Axel, and eventually the frightfully competent Icelander Hans.  The wonderously fantastical prehistoric and geological settings are beautifully described.  The story is fantastic, but neither full-out fantasy or science-fiction.  Everything described by Jules Verne in the book in terms of geology and natural history reflects the state of scientific knowledge at the time of writing (1864) - except (of course) the fantastical bits. 

 

From a variety of comments on the internet, apparently the previous English translations of this book have been butchered with insertions, omissions, name changes and clunky writing.  This new translation by William Butcher aims to be faithful to the original French novel.  I found this translation to be well done, with the narrative flowing smoothly.  It didn't read like a translation at all.  The book includes notes where relevant.  This edition also has in interesting introduction which discusses certain aspects of the book, as well as important aspects of Jules Verne's life.

 

 

 

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