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review 2018-03-16 17:26
Bad Reputation by Nicole Edwards
Bad Reputation: A Bad Boys of Sports Novel - Nicole Edwards

I requested this book from Netgalley but I have no idea why. I am not interested in sports. I’m guessing it was the cover.

I managed to get through this one despite myself. It was touch and go there for a bit, I’m not even going to attempt to pretend otherwise. Only my laziness to figure out what I wanted to read next kept me going. One of these days I will learn how to DNF correctly.

Chase is a rich and famous hockey star and has a reputation as being “the bad boy of hockey” because he’s a trouble maker on the ice and he likes to sleep with women. Ummm, ok. He’s young, he’s loaded and he’s beautiful. I’d say that’s pretty normal not “bad” but what do I know? He is secretly in love with his best friend Cassie but he knows he can never share his feelings because it will destroy their close friendship. Thus, all the sleeping around with the hockey “bunnies”. 

After Chase scares off Cassie’s latest date (in a real jerky alpha move) she laughs it off and calls him an asshole but she is relieved. She is focused on her career and moving on up and isn’t seriously pursuing a relationship. She’d much rather hang out with Chase and his friends than some random boring guy anyway. And when your best friend is a hockey god normal guys don’t stand a chance.

My description is making this sound dreadful, I know that and it’s not. At least not yet!

Cassie is chosen to make a key note speech and present a huge rollout for her company. This is a BIG deal for Cassie. It takes weeks of preparation and will help her reach her goals. The trip is in Vegas. She decides to take Chase with her and it’s here that the story goes all to hell for me. I won’t spoil it for everyone dying to read it but I will say that some colossally idiotic behavior goes down and Cassie ends up looking like a complete idiot when it was all said and done.

You might be able to get past that and forget about it. Not I. She is only 28 at the time, you might say, but at 28 I already had two kids, a mortgage, and a full time job and was well on the way to becoming the grumpy reader I am today. 28 is old enough to know better than to act like a coed on spring break. Cassie, up until Vegas, was painted as a responsible, intelligent woman so none of this made sense. This Vegas nonsense tainted the rest of the story for me because after Vegas happened I didn’t give any craps about her and her relationship with Chase.

That’s better. So, as I mentioned, I did carry on after taking a little break and a few deep cleansing breaths. What followed wasn’t really worth the effort. Their sexy times were hot, I’ll give them that, but that’s not enough to carry me through a book like this when their thoughts and self-talk are repetitive and tedious. Chase describes Cassie as “hilarious” but I never saw it which is a crying shame. Telling me someone is hilarious does me no good at all when they come across as average to boring on the page. They say love is blind though and I do believe it is true. Ah well, perhaps I’m just too grouchy for this kind of book. 

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text 2018-03-14 18:59
Reading progress update: I've read 50% ish
Bad Reputation: A Bad Boys of Sports Novel - Nicole Edwards

This heroine just did something so incredibly stupid and out of character that I don't give a damn what happens to her and her lover boy now. Such a dum-dum I cannot stand it.

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review 2018-03-07 15:47
ARC Review: How to Claim an Undead Soul (Beginner’s Guide to Necromancy #2) by Hailey Edwards
How to Claim an Undead Soul - Hailey Edwards
How to Claim an Undead Soul

Beginner's Guide to Necromancy #2
Hailey Edwards
Urban Fantasy
December 15th 2017
ARC Review Copy


Life was simpler for Grier when she was flat broke and a social pariah. Now she's carrying the baggage that goes along with the title of Dame Woolworth, and shouldering that weight is giving her a serious crick in the neck. Her work as a Haint is the one thing that makes her feel normal, but even that's more paranormal than usual.


Spirits are vanishing from well-known hot spots on the ghost tour circuit, and vampires are turning up as shriveled husks. When Grier stumbles across the menace preying on Savannah's supernatural community, what she uncovers is bigger than a few flickering lampposts gone dark. It's a deadly threat unleashed by one of their own, and the cost of saving her city might be her life.






How to Claim an Undead Soul is book two in the Beginner’s Guide to Necromancy by Hailey Edwards.


This series is one you do need to read in order. Each book builds on the previous one.


Grier has been through a lot in her life and theirs still more hardships, trills, and heartache in store for her.


I had to remember a few details about what happened in book one. It took me a moment to get back into the swing and the story, but once I did I enjoyed How to Claim an Undead Soul. We get moment in the story and theirs a mystery to solve in regards to ghosts disappearing and no one knows why. The author gives us more developments; from Grier, from her love interests, from her powers, and more. I enjoyed the twist in the plot and had a delightful time with the story.


As for Grier’s relationships. I’m not a fan of adding in a new man to via for her attentions, but we see a competitor possibly rising up. Grier has the hots for Boaz and I’d like to see the underdog get the girl, but that love angle is still undecided even though Boaz is finally waking up and realizing Grier is what he wants. Then we have Linus who is their to help Grier learn about her powers, but he’s also their for other seasons. Not everything is clear. One thing I did get is that Linus hides who he truly is and I can’t see him every truly opening and being what Grier needs, at least at this stage.


How to Claim an Undead Soul was a satisfying read.


Rating: 3.5 Stars


*Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy provided by Hailey Edwards with the sole purpose of an honest review. All thoughts, comments and ratings are my own.


Was this review helpful? If so, please consider liking it on Goodreads (Angela)!





I was born and raised in Northern Indiana. I’m an outdoor sun loving reader living near San Fransisco. I’m a mother, wife, dog owner, animal, and book lover. I’m the owner, reviewer, and mind behind Angel’s Guilty Pleasures. My favorite animals are horses & dogs. As for reading I love all things paranormal & urban fantasy. My favorite shifters are dragons!

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Source: angelsguiltypleasures.com/2018/03/arc-review-how-to-claim-an-undead-soul-beginners-guide-to-necromancy-2-by-hailey-edwards
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text 2018-02-28 17:55
Detection Club Bingo: My Progress So Far
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books - Martin Edwards
The Golden Age of Murder - Martin Edwards
Murder of a Lady (British Library Crime Classics) - Anthony Wynne
The Tales of Max Carrados - Ernest Bramah,Stephen Fry
Pietr Le Letton - Georges Simenon
Lonely Magdalen: A Murder Story - Henry Wade
Margery Allingham Omnibus: Includes Sweet Danger, The Case of the Late Pig, The Tiger in the Smoke - Margery Allingham
The Franchise Affair - Josephine Tey
Family Matters (British Library Crime Classics) - Anthony Rolls
Death on the Cherwell - Mavis Doriel Hay


First bingo (bottom row).  Not that it greatly matters, but still. :D  Progress!


The Squares / Chapters:

1. A New Era Dawns: Ernest Bramah - The Tales of Max Carrados;

Emmuska Orczy - The Old Man in the Corner

2. The Birth of the Golden Age
3. The Great Detectives:
Margery Allingham - The Crime at Black Dudley, Mystery Mile, Look to the Lady, Police at the Funeral, Sweet Danger, Death of a Ghost, Flowers for the Judge, The Case of the Late Pig, Dancers in Mourning, The Fashion in Shrouds, Traitor's Purse, and The Tiger in the Smoke;

Anthony Berkeley - The Poisoned Chocolates Case

4. 'Play Up! Play Up! and Play the Game!'
5. Miraculous Murders:
Anthony Wynne - Murder of a Lady
6. Serpents in Eden
7. Murder at the Manor:
Ethel Lina White - The Spiral Staircase (aka Some Must Watch)
8. Capital Crimes
9. Resorting to Murder
10. Making Fun of Murder
11. Education, Education, Education:
Mavis Doriel Hay - Death on the Cherwell
12. Playing Politics
13. Scientific Enquiries
14. The Long Arm of the Law:
Henry Wade - Lonely Magdalen
15. The Justice Game
16. Multiplying Murders
17. The Psychology of Crime
18. Inverted Mysteries
19. The Ironists:
Anthony Rolls - Family Matters
20. Fiction from Fact: Josephine Tey - The Franchise Affair

21. Singletons
22. Across the Atlantic
23. Cosmopolitan Crimes: Georges Simenon - Pietr le Letton (Pietr the Latvian)
24. The Way Ahead


Free Square / Eric the Skull: Martin Edwards - The Golden Age of Murder


The book that started it all:

Martin Edwards - The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books


The Detection Club Reading Lists:
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: The "100 Books" Presented
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 1-5

The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 6 & 7
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 8-10
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 11-15
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 16-20
The story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 21-24

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review 2018-02-21 21:07
Somebody At The Door by Raymond Postgate
Somebody at the Door - Raymond Postgate

I haven't read the other BLCC book by Postgate, Verdict of Twelve, which was recommended by Martin Edwards in Chapter 15, The Justice Game, of The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books.


As is the case in most of the BLCC books, Martin Edwards did write an introduction for Somebody at the Door. This one rose to the top of my current reading list based upon the WWII setting and the plot summary which captured my interest.


This is a very odd little book. It operates within a standard mystery framework: Councillor Henry Grayling, the victim, returns home after a day at work, travelling by train and in possession of more than 100 pounds in wages to be paid out the following day. Sometime after making it home, his wife Renata calls the doctor to report that he was later coming home and that he was very ill. Some time later, Grayling expires of what ends up being a mustard gas attack.


Inspector Holly, charged with solving the crime, determines who was in the train car with Grayling and conducts an investigation into their backgrounds. Each of them, in their own way, have a motive to murder Grayling, who was an unlikeable and highly unpleasant man. 


Each of the suspects is granted his/her own chapter, which is where things get either interesting or bogged down, depending upon your perspective, in terms of the narrative. Each chapter functions as a mini-tale, providing detailed insight into what life was like in England during 1942 for various characters and social classes. If you, as a reader, are interested in this sort of thing, then the book is a fascinating read. If you are here for the mystery, well, a great deal of the detailed meanderings are superfluous and tend to grind the mystery narrative to a halt.


I am interested in this sort of thing, so I enjoyed those chapters. But a lot of it has little to nothing to do with the central mystery. In addition, there was a pretty big plot element that was just left unresolved without being addressed by the author in any meaningful way at all. I think that Verdict of Twelve might be a better bet than this one!

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