logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: fear
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-21 12:15
Review: Every Body Yoga by Jessamyn Stanley
Every Body Yoga: Let Go of Fear, Get On the Mat, Love Your Body. - Jessamyn Stanley

Published by: Workman Publishing (13th April 2017)

 

ISBN: 978-0761193111

 

Source: Netgalley 

 

Rating: 5*

 

Description: 

From the unforgettable teacher Jessamyn Stanley comes Every Body Yoga, a book that breaks all the stereotypes. It's a book of inspiration for beginners of all shapes and sizes: If Jessamyn could transcend these emotional and physical barriers, so can we. lt's a book for readers already doing yoga, looking to refresh their practice or find new ways to stay motivated.

 

lt's a how-to book: Here are easy-to-follow directions to 50 basic yoga poses and 10 sequences to practice at home, all photographed in full colour. lt's a book that challenges the larger issues of body acceptance and the meaning of beauty. Most of all, it's a book that changes the paradigm, showing us that yoga isn't about how one looks, but how one feels, with yoga sequences like "I Want to Energise My Spirit," "I Need to Release Fear," "I Want to Love Myself".

 

Jessamyn Stanley, a yogi who breaks all the stereotypes, has built a life as an internationally recognized yoga teacher and award-winning Instagram star by combining a deep understanding for yoga with a willingness to share her personal struggles in a way that touches everyone who comes to know her. Now she brings her body-positive, emotionally uplifting approach to yoga in a book that will help every reader discover the power of yoga and how to weave it seamlessly into his or her life.

 

Review:

Wow...I love this book! Jessamyn's attitude is inspirational.  Her body-positive approach to classes is fantastic and the way the book is written just outstanding. To write about her personal journey towards self love and body acceptance must have been such a difficult yet cathartic thing to do. To be at peace with her body now and to be such an inspiration to so many others as a yogi and such an influence via her Instagram account must bring her the happiness you see on her face. 

 

The yoga poses in the book are in full colour, and it is clearly demonstrated how to get into and out of each pose too. There is an emphasis on breathing, interesting chapters about the history of yoga, and lots of detailed information. This is probably the only yoga book you'll ever need! I read an ebook but have since got a printed copy for reference. 

I received an ARC of this book from the publisher via Netgalley and this is my unbiased review. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-07 02:22
Meg Collett: The Killing Season
The Killing Season (Fear University Book 2) - Meg Collett

This is the second book in a series, so you are going to want to read the first book in the series Fear University to understand this world and who/what the main characters are fighting/fighting for.

Winter in the Alaskan North has short days and long nights especially for 65 days of the year, which is perfect for the Aswang to hunt and kill and challenge. This is where Ollie and her friends have been stationed. They need to protect the humans from the Aswang, so each night they along with the other hunters will stalk, hunt and kill. But the fight for survival does not begin and end as one enters and leaves their base, murder is about to happen inside the walls as well, so there is no where that they are safe they always have to be on gaurd, but they only need to try and survive for 65 days, that's doable right?

I liked this one better than the first, I found that this one was darker, more twisted and at times fairly graphic when compared to the first book in the series. Additionally, I did not feel like this book had any down time in the story, as it is the Killing season, there are lots of hunts and killing that need to be achieved as well as trying to figure out what is going on inside the base walls. It was also interesting the family dynamics that are played up in this book that you do not really know who Ollie should trust and really is there more danger in the house rather than outside it.

The first book also lacked having more than one point of view, so it was really nice to have Sunny's POV in this book to give a change up from Ollie's very negative one (really she is doom and gloom most of the time). Sunny was also able to give a different perspective on what was happening and how Ollie is perceived by those around her even her friends. For lack of better words having Sunny tell part of the story was very refreshing in this book.

If you are a fan of books with sexual tension well, The Killing Season has is in spades between Ollie and Luke. You will keep wanting to have them interact more and more as the book goes on as eat time is more "heated" than the last. If you are wanting more of a love story/crush then you have Sunny and Hatter, so Collett does a good job of covering both these aspects but at the same time having those relationships secondary to the main premise of the book.

I think my least favourite part in this book is that I was able to figure out the big twist way before it was revealed (which is the same problem I had with the first book in this series) and I was just waiting for the characters to catch up to what I had already figured out. However, this series as a whole so far has an interesting premise which overall does make for an interesting read.

I am enjoying this series and it is nice that Collett has improved from the first book to the second, which makes me have high hopes for the third, which I am planning on picking up soon.

Enjoy!!!

If You Like This,
Check These Out Too:
http://j9books.blogspot.ca/2010/12/jordan-summers-red.html  http://j9books.blogspot.ca/2012/07/j-pitts-black-blade-blues.html  http://j9books.blogspot.ca/2016/07/kim-falconerthe-blood-in-beginning.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-30 21:12
An intense psychological thriller about a disturbing topic.
The Fear - C.L. Taylor

Thanks to NetGalley and to the Publishers (Avon) for offering me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

After reading this novel, which is a page-turner and moves at a fast pace, I checked the reviews, and it is one of these odd cases when I agreed both with the positive and with the negative reviews about the book. Some of them compared it to other novels by C.L. Taylor, an author who has a big following (this novel is a bestseller Amazon UK), but as I had not read anything by her before, I cannot comment on that. But I agreed with some of the other opinions.

The novel revolves around three females, two grown women, and a thirteen-year-old girl. In fact, they are three generations, with Wendy the oldest and Chloe the youngest. We follow the points of view of the three women for most of the novel, although there is more of the story told from Lou’s point of view. Her part of the story is narrated in the first person, while the rest are in the third person, and, at least at the beginning, she is the most active of the three. Due to her father’s death she has to go back to the town where she grew up, to deal with her father’s house, and her past comes back to haunt her, both figuratively and literally, when she sees the man who had abused her (Mike) when she was a teenager and worries that he is at it again. The three women have been affected by what Mike did, and the novel is very good at focusing on the emotions of the characters, that go from love to denial, and to absolute fear. Lou’s account is interspersed with fragments from her diary as a teenager, where we get to fully understand the background of the story and how dangerous this man truly is. The combination of charm, manipulation, and his skill at picking up girls lacking in confidence and easy targets for his advances is well portrayed. The subject matter reminded me of an Australian novel I’ve really enjoyed, The Silent Kookaburra.

The subject remains as relevant (if not more) as ever, unfortunately, and this book offers a good perspective of the psychological damage such abuse can have, not only on the direct victims (that might never get over it) but also on those around them (family, wives, friends…). Should they have believed the abuser’s excuses? Are they guilty by association? What is their responsibility? The book is set in the UK and it refers specifically to changes in Criminal Law (like the introduction of the sex offenders register) but although it does not discuss those issues in detail, I don’t think that would cause difficulty to readers from other places.

The three characters fall (or have fallen) prey to Mike and find themselves in very vulnerable positions. It is impossible not to wonder what one would do faced with their dilemma, particularly that of Lou. Her impulsive actions are extreme and I agree with the readers who have commented that at times the book is over the top, although Lou’s doubts, her continuous hesitation, and her fear feel real. She is not alone in being pushed to the edge, and this is a book where characters do not play safe, rather the opposite.

The writing is fluid, and brings to life the three female characters, whose only connection is through Mike, perhaps with more immediacy in the case of Lou —this is helped by the first person narration and her diary— but it manages to make us empathise and feel for the three by the end of the story. And no, not all of them are likeable, to begin with.  I know some readers worry about head-hopping, but each chapter states clearly which character’s point of view we are following and there’s no possible confusion. Although there are brief moments of relief when things seem to be about to take a turn for the better, this is only to lure us into a false sense of security, and the tension and the pressure keep increasing and so does the pace. The ending is satisfying and will have most readers cheering on.

If you’re wondering what are the negative comments I agreed with, well, I was not necessarily talking about the degree of suspension of disbelief (yes, readers will need a fair deal of this, but as we are engaged with the characters and their plight, this is not difficult to maintain), but about some anachronisms, some details that seemed incongruent to the time when the story is set. I felt that the emphasis on Facebook messages, fake accounts, hacking, etc. seemed excessive for a story set in 2007. Other readers, who decided to research in more detail, discovered that indeed, some of the things mentioned, Apps, songs, etc., were not available yet. One reader noted that she could not understand why the story wasn’t set in the present, as that would have avoided these issues, but another pointed out that some aspects of the plot would only make sense if the story was set up in the recent past (including some of the legal issues). I wonder (as a writer) if the story was originally set in the present but somebody spotted the plot issues and came up with the solution of moving it back in time (without changing some of the modern references).

This novel does a good job of creating believable characters and making readers think about the plight of the victims of paedophiles. Although it might be less satisfactory to die-hard lovers of police procedural books, I think it is difficult to read it without empathising with the female characters and having to pause to reflect on this serious issue. And the questions at the end will further engage book club readers and encourage meaningful discussion. I don’t think this will be the last novel by C.L. Taylor I’ll read and I can easily understand why she is popular. (Ah, and she calls book bloggers book fairies. I like that!)

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-28 05:57
The Fear - C.L. Taylor

Lou was groomed by an older man when she was just 14 years old and when she returns home years later discovers history repeating itself with the same man and another vulnerable teenager. Looking at other reviews I was expecting to be knocked for six by this book, but was too busy feeling irritated by all the stupid, annoying decisions the older Lou kept making - it was all too much for me! I sympathised with her earlier, horrible experiences with this man, but had none for how she is now and just found her too exasperating. Wendy too wasn’t likeable - just weird. Topical subject to write about and well written as always, but not my favourite book by this author.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-22 10:17
The Fear by C.L. Taylor
The Fear - C.L. Taylor
The Fear tells the story of Louise, a schoolgirl who ran away to France with her karate teacher, thinking it was just for the weekend. Instead it turns into something a whole lot more, which leads to him going to prison for five years. Through a series of flashbacks you learn what happened, and also why Louise never testified against him in court. Told from three different perspectives, you are thrown into this story, and watch as the twists and turns unfold. Nothing is what it seems in this book, and you will question just what is going on - just like Louise does.
 
Very well written, with no editing or grammatical errors that disrupted my reading flow, this was a thrilling read that captured my interest from the very start. The way the story unfolds keeps your interest, and I adored the ending - although I won't say anything else about that!
 
Definitely recommended by me.
 
* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and my comments here are my honest opinion. *
 
Merissa
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!
Source: sites.google.com/site/archaeolibrarian/merissa-reviews/thefearbycltaylor
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?