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review 2018-03-12 18:36
Marinating In Murder - Linda Wiken


Marinating in Murder is the 3rd book in the Dinner Club mystery series.


When Alison, a cop and a club member of the Culinary Capers Dinner Club find herself in hot water for the murder of her ex-husband, she must rely on the investigation of the police department to solve the case.  Event planner J.J. Tanner and also a club member doesn't have faith in the swiftness of the department to protect Alison's innocence, so she hashes an investigation of her own.  


Cooking or food-themed cozy mysteries are one of my favorites to read.  I love to read the delectable dishes the characters are eating and the recipes the author normally adds at the end of the book.  


The characters were easy to like and imagine, however at times I felt J.J. to be a little naive about her instincts and affairs of the heart.


Though I knew early in the story who committed the murder that didn't lessen my curiosity because the writing was steady and likable and it's always fun to figure out the motive.


This is my first time reading books written by Linda Wiken and I will add the first two book in the series to my ever growing reading list.  


I recommend Marinating in Murder to all cozy mystery readers especially those who love food-themed mysteries.  This cozy mystery is a light read for beginner cozy readers, too.


Thank you Netgalley and Berkley for an ARC in exchange for my honest review.



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review 2018-03-08 21:56
A fun and delicious book for readers with a sense of adventure who admire creativity
Murder at the Bijou: Three Ingredients I - Teagan Riordain Geneviene

I am a big fan of Teagan Ríordáin Geneviene, as an author, a blogger, and I was lucky to discover her blog a few years back, and although I missed some of her early serials at the time of their initial conception, I have managed to catch up with them over time. I have also read her novel, Atonement, Tennessee (you can check my review here) and know that apart from an imagination that knows no bounds, and a love of period research and attention to detail, she has a way with words and can create magical characters that readers get to care for and make them live through situations that never fail to surprise us and keep us on tenterhooks.

As she explains in her description, she has been running a number of serials on her blog, pantser style. She asks her readers for things and/or ingredients, and she makes up a story that keeps developing as her imagination, and the things and ingredients, dictate. I am in awe at her creativity and I must recommend her blog (Teagan’s Books), as I know she is working on her next serial (and her process of creation is totally interactive).

Many of her readers (I included) kept telling her we would like to have the option of having her serials in book format, and eventually, she relented. I have reviewed her first serial in book format, Three Things Serial Story: A Little 1920s Story (you can read my review here) and many of the things I said about the previous book can be applied to this one. This is another light, fun, and fast book, with the same protagonist, Pip, a young woman, a flapper (as she keeps reminding herself and us, because being modern at the time was not an easy task), who, on this occasion, is sent to stay with her grandmother, Granny Phanny (she is a fabulous character, and although she would hate to be called a flapper, she is an utterly modern woman) in Savannah so she can learn how to cook. That helps introduce the ingredients part of the story, and the culinary theme adds a layer of interest to the story, although I would advise not to read the book when you’re very hungry, because although sometimes the ingredients don’t end up in a dish, they often do, and they all sound delicious.

Pip, who narrates the story in the first person, is recovering from a heartache and meets a cast of wonderful characters, from a family of Chinese restaurateurs, to a vet and his doctor wife, G-men, police officers, mobsters, and there is even a paranormal element in the story. Oh, and let’s not forget a collection of pets that will warm your hearts and make you laugh.

Pip’s language remains as peculiar as usual, and the author seamlessly includes the popular and fashionable expressions of the era in her book. I challenge readers not to end up using some of them, especially some of Pip’s favourites.  

I recommended readers of the previous serial to play a game and try and imagine in which direction they would send the story, or how they would use the three things at the beginning of each chapter. You can do the same here, and if you’re fond of cooking, I’m sure you will have fun exploring possible ways of using the ingredients, both to cook and to advance the story. And by the end of the book, you’ll be amazed at how the author has managed to create a cohesive story from such diverse elements.

I recommend this book to readers with a sense of fun and play who enjoy a fast and light mystery (cozy style. No explicit violence, although there is violence, no sex scenes) set in the Jazz Age (oh, don’t forget to follow the author’s blog if you enjoy that historical period as she shares a post on the subject every Wednesday), with charming characters and great food. And even if you don’t have a lot of time to read for long stretches at a time, as the serial was created to be read a chapter per week, it is very easy to follow the story and not get lost. So, there is no excuse!

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text 2018-03-04 05:38
Febuary wrap up
Food Wars!, Vol. 2: Shokugeki no Soma - Yuki MORISAKI,Shun Saeki,Yuuto Tsukuda
the princess saves herself in this one - Amanda Lovelace
The Bookshop on the Corner - Jenny Colgan
One True Loves: A Novel - Taylor Jenkins Reid
Taming Him - Kennedy Fox
Every Day - David Levithan

1 manga

1 poetry 

3 audio books 

1 library  book

1 kindle book

6 books this month 


Favorites one true loves 

Taming him and bookshop on the corner 


Hope you had a gpod reading month 

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review 2018-03-01 06:42
The Science of Food by Marty Jopson
The Science of Food: An Exploration of What We Eat and How We Cook - Marty Jopson

TITLE:  The Science of Food:  An Exploration of What We Eat and How We Cook


AUTHOR:  Marty Jopson




FORMAT:  Hardcover


ISBN-13:  9781782438380



Marty Jopson has written a short, easily digestible book on the science behind cooking food and kitchen gadgets - everything from the physics and materials science of the knife and chopping board you use; the perfect frying pan; the invention of pressure cookers; to industrial processes required to make puffed cereals, dried mashed potatoes and refrigeration; to the denaturing of proteins when you cook a steak or boil an egg; why emulsions like mayonnaise work; and other vaguely food related stuff like sell-by dates, artificial sweeteners, making chocolate and aeroponics (the process of growing plants in an air/mist environment instead of soil or water). 


This book seems especially written for the non-scientifically inclined reader with interesting examples, "digestible" language, minimal scientific jargon and numerous illustrations.  I found the book to be an informative, interesting and easy read, with minimal social chit-chat, but I do wish the author had gone into more detail!


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text 2018-02-20 16:30
Most Enjoyable
Food: A Cultural Culinary History - Ken Albala

I am enjoying listening to this series of lectures so much that I don't want to stop to listen to the couple of chapters of Cosmos that I just promised myself I would intersperse with my other reading. I'm enjoying it so much that I can almost forgive this college professor his frequent mispronunciation of words like "arbiter." It is not "AR-bite-er. 


Food is essential to our being (without it we died) yet when we study history in the classroom, we rarely approach events in anything but political terms, so it is very interesting (and myth-busting) to approach our past from the point of view of what was being hunted, gathered, cultivated, traded and consumed. Please don't think that this is just a fluffy series of lectures; it is well grounded in events and contemporary original texts.


BTW, this may also be about food and eating but it is nothing like Consider the Fork, which I also read recently. They compliment one another.

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