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review 2017-06-22 19:47
Interesting if you are a fan.
The Mission Chinese Food Cookbook - Dann... The Mission Chinese Food Cookbook - Danny Bowien,Chris Ying

Can't remember what drove me to get this book but it sounded intriguing. I've never been to the Mission Chinese restaurants but I enjoy the stories of cooks, chefs, etc. and thought it might be a good read.

 

Part-cookbook, part biography, part interview with Danny Bowien, Chris Ying and some of the people they've worked with, etc. the book itself is trying to be too much of everything without being any one thing. I think I was under the impression it was more of a cookbook/biography of Mission Chinese itself (as in the restaurant but not necessarily the people behind it).

 

There are some really gorgeous pictures (the book itself also has a nice picture of a dish on the front cover) but I wouldn't be compelled to make any of the recipes since I am not the type to put in that effort and would trust the experts a lot more. I also wasn't all that interested in either of Danny or Chris (or anyone else's!) stories in the book. 

 

Based on Yelp reviews it seems to be they found some sort of way to make Americanized Chinese food/Americanized Asian fusion food, etc. into a "thing" which is odd because it's not a new concept.

 

As you can tell, I don't get the hype. Skip it unless you really like the concept or like cookbooks.

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text 2017-06-10 03:03
Baking Powder Wars by Linda Civitello
Baking Powder Wars: The Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking (Heartland Foodways) - Linda Civitello

 

 I find history truly fascinating, from the changes we can read and see in people, culture, places. One thing that connects us more is none other then food. Food history is just as rich as it showcases the culture impact every day food such as Baking Powder had on us,that today we take for granted.


 Linda Covitello packs in so much history from the 19th century to today in how Baking Power changed the way we cook and in some cases changed the world.
Covitello just doesn't talk about baking power, but takes the reader along as you see how women, homemakers,bakers and later inventors used to cook before baking powder with old recipes, dairy entries and digging deep into our history from America to Britain and all over.


While I truly enjoyed the history, at times I felt that Covitello put a little to much info, making the reading at times a bit slower or something we had to slog through to get at the meat of the matter. This was a double edge sword though. One had to understand this to understand how it effect that. While this balancing act was troublesome, it didn't take away to much from the book overall.


  For those who love history to cooking, this is a fun book to dig into and learn how something as simple as baking powder changed the world around us.

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text 2017-06-09 19:04
Not exactly what southerners mean by "Bless Your Heart" — but curious about this one.
Bless Your Heart: Saving the World One Covered Dish at a Time - Patsy Caldwell

I certainly need to have a look at a cookbook that includes recipes to take to book clubs, eh?

 

The synopsis of Bless Your Heart: Saving the World One Covered Dish at a Time reads:

"What would the South be without deviled eggs at the church potluck? Can you even begin to imagine a family reunion where nobody remembered to make the baked beans and sweet tea? Is it possible to celebrate a major holiday without crunchy sweet potato casserole on the buffet table?

 

Patsy Caldwell and Amy Lyles Wilson don’t think so, either. Indeed, every occasion in the South comes with its own essential menu, and they’re all here in this collection of time-honored favorites.

 

Want to show your team pride with the spread at your next tailgating bash? Patsy and Amy have got you covered with desserts that boast every color in the SEC. No matter the particular moment of life you encounter, this is your go-to encyclopedia of Southern cooking and traditions around the table.

 

Bless Your Heart will do just that. These recipes are proven to comfort and satisfy your family and the people who may as well be kin. Whether the occasion is a holiday gathering, a garden party, or one of life’s unexpected events, food is the common denominator in the South. Lifelong Southerners Patsy Caldwell and Amy Lyles Wilson understand the craft of Southern cooking, and how few things are as nurturing as a meal lovingly prepared in the traditions of the South.

 

There’s a recipe here for every situation in which a Southerner may find herself. From book clubs to baby showers, Patsy and Amy know exactly what flavors perfectly complement any of life’s occasions. You’ll enjoy the familiar stories of traditions in Dixie along the way, and no doubt pick up a new idea or two of ways to celebrate Southern culture, nourish your loved ones, and make new memories."

 

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text 2017-06-03 22:43
More Pie
Art of the Pie: A Practical Guide to Homemade Crusts, Fillings, and Life - Kate McDermott,Andrew Scrivani

Younger son is not a big fan of most fruits, but he likes pumpkin pie and has been asking to make one for a while.  So over the Memorial Day weekend, younger son and I made up a full batch of butter:Crisco pie crust following The Art of Pie.  

 

On Saturday, we measured out the flour into a metal bowl and put it into the freezer while we went and caught up on overdue yard work.  During one of our breaks, we made up the crust and then refrigerated overnight.

 

Sunday, We followed the recipe for pumpkin pie (using condensed milk rather than the non-dairy variant). It definitely was far less labor intensive than the pumpkin chiffon pie that is my husband's default (no fussing with separating eggs and whipping egg whites).  The resulting pie was quite nice and not too dense, though I would add a bit more cinnamon and ginger the next time I make it.

 

Monday,I took the other half of the crust and turned it into an asparagus tomato quiche.  It looks pretty, and the crust was very nice, but the custard/filling didn't quite set. Either I goofed on the custard proportions, or the long delay between prepping the veggies and actually making quiche which allowed the filling to come all the way to room temperature affected it more than I expected.

 

  

 

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