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Search tags: for-all-age-readers
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text 2018-03-16 15:42
Question - Advanced Reader Reviews?

I'm sorry I haven't posted any reviews in a long while. I've been flooded with advance readers and I only have a month to read each one from the time I get them. (I'm reading them electronically and they expire.)


I usually don't post my reviews of the advanced readers I get, but would that be something you would like to see? I have about 6 manuscripts I need to read and I'm almost done with one of them so if you want to see what I'm reading before it publishes, let me know!

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text 2018-03-08 21:10
Stupid Things (Some) Authors Say

As seen in a discussion regarding if authors should read reviews for their books, and if those reviews are "feedback" for the author:


"...why an author should even have a place on which readers can post reviews, if the author isn't supposed to look at them..."


I don't know if this author knows something I don't - that there are authors who have set up places for readers to post reviews, or if she is under the impression that GoodReads and Amazon (which is what we're discussing) are sites authors have set up for readers to post reviews.


Either way, I'm shaking my head.


Isn't it so nice of those authors to provide areas for us little readers to share our opinions of their books?  For author "feedback" no doubt. ;)

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review 2018-02-24 23:06
Freedom Summer by Deborah Wiles
Freedom Summer - Deborah Wiles,Jerome Lagarrigue

Freedom Summer by Deborah Wiles is a beautiful story of friendship between John Henry (a young black boy) and Joe (a young white boy) in the 1960s. The two boys spend their entire summer together, going on adventures and making unforgettable memories. As the boys spend time together, Joe begins to notice all of the things John Henry can't do and all of the places he is not allowed into simply because of this skin color. But despite this, the boys become close friends and embrace each other's differences. This book has a great variety of vocabulary that readers can learn from and excellent illustrations that paint an accurate picture of the South during the 1960s. 


I would use this book during a Social Studies lesson and ask students to compare and contrast John Henry's and Joe's lives before and after the Civil Rights Act was passed in 1964. Using historical facts learned in previous lessons and the book, I would ask them to compare/contrast what they could and could not do and what their daily life would look like. What changed? What stayed the same? They would write their response in a PowerPoint or Prezi presentation that they could share in class. 

Lexile Measure: AD460L

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review 2018-02-23 21:52
Miss Nelson is Missing by Harry Allard
Miss Nelson Is Missing! - Harry Allard,James Marshall

Miss Nelson is Missing by Harry Allard tells a valuable story on being respectful towards your teacher/adults and being grateful for what/who you have. This is such a fun story for students to read or hear read aloud to them. It is light hearted and funny but still teaches a moral lesson. The students will learn the importance of being grateful for the people in your life and treating them with the respect they deserve. 


I would have students create a "Wanted" or "Missing Person" poster to find the two teachers, Miss Nelson and Miss Swamp. In the poster they would draw a picture of the missing character of their choice and write a brief description on the character. 

Guided Reading: L
Lexile: 340L
Accelerated Reader Level: 2.7
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review 2018-02-23 20:37
I Love My Hair by Natasha Tarpley
I Love My Hair! - Natasha Tarpley

I really enjoyed reading I Love My Hair by Natasha Tarpley. This book serves a greater purpose than just a good story. It teaches young girls (and even boys) to love their hair (or any other characteristic) and its uniqueness. Specifically, this book tackles the long history of young, black girls disliking their hair because it is "different" from everyone else hair. This book highlights all the great things her hair can do and all the different ways she can wear it as well as the heritage and culture of her hair. I also love the use of positive similes and metaphors when comparing the main character's hair to objects. 


I would read this book to the class, pausing to discuss with students the ways her mom does her hair, the different styles she wears her hair in (and ask the student what their favorite hairstyles are), and feelings towards her hair (compared to the student's feeling towards their own hair), etc. After reading I would ask students to write a paragraph that connects the book to themselves or their own hair. I would ask them to use evidence from the text to support their connection.

Lexile Measure: 670L 
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