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review 2021-01-20 01:44
THE TRUTHS WE HOLD: AN AMERICAN JOURNEY by Kamala Harris
The Truths We Hold: An American Journey - Kamala Harris

I wish I had read this before the 2020 primaries.  This gives a good idea of what her platform was.  She describes the problems facing us today and gives solutions to those problems.  Utilizing stories from her own life and others who have crossed her path, she gives faces to those problems and solutions.  Ms. Harris comes across as someone who listens and tries to help where she can and she'll go where she needs to to lend that helping hand.  She has a lot of empathy and compassion.  I am glad I read this.  I think she will help lead this country back into the light.

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review 2021-01-08 04:19
Review: You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost): A Memoir
You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost): A Memoir - Joss Whedon - foreword,Felicia Day,Felicia Day,Simon & Schuster Audio

This was amazing. It was funny, as expected, but also sad. I love how Felicia grew up "weird"; I feel like we all grow up in varying degrees of weird. It's what makes us who we are. It was fascinating hearing, in her own words, in her own voice, her childhood, her initial trip into the interwebs, her gaming obsession. It was sad to hear about her descent into depression, and the decline of not only her mental health but her physical heath. Her slow journey back to to good form was heartening. Creating her webshow and learning all it entailed was surprising and it made me so happy that she never gave up and ended up with own company. Sometimes I forget she was behind Geek & Sundry. We're not even going to talk about internet trolls and especially not gamer gate. This look into Felicia's life, a person who's content, I have greately enjoyed over the years was super fun and I think I got misty-eyed a time or two. I have the paperback and the audiobook and I find listing to the audio by the author always makes the read/listen that much better. This did not disappoint.

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review 2020-09-27 17:59
Tweak by Nic Sheff
Tweak: Growing Up on Methamphetamines - Nic Sheff

What an emotional rollercoaster! Sadly, one I can relate to as well being a former drug user and addict. This book takes you to all of the emotions you felt when you were a user and running from your own life and self. It was often hard to read. It was too raw and real at times and I'd have to put it aside for a bit. I still had to get through it though and pray that Nic got to his light at the end of the tunnel, so-to-speak. This is an incredible memoir! I hope Nic's life and experiences can help someone else. Addicts feel like no one understands, when surprisingly there is usually someone who does. It's just finding that someone that can help you see your own destrictuve self from their experiences. That's how some of us addicts can heal. Seeing your true self can be so hurtful, that's why you can't do it alone. Everybody needs somebody sometimes, man that line is so true! I am now going to watch the film adaption, Beautiful Boy. It stars Steve Carrell and Timothy Chalomet. It's gonna be a ride, and emotional one, but I look forward to it.

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2021/09/tweak-by-nic-sheff.html
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review 2020-08-25 19:44
Heavy by Kiese Laymon
Heavy: An American Memoir - Kiese Laymon

This is a well-written short memoir about the author’s family, body, and experiences as a black boy and man in America. Kiese Laymon is an English professor from Mississippi, and this memoir starts when he was 11 and continues through his 40s, though of course covering so many years in 241 pages means we skip over a lot. The memoir is addressed to his mother, who is one of those mothers people are especially driven to write memoirs about: brilliant, loving, and abusive. He also writes a lot about his body issues, going from obesity to what looks like anorexia and an exercise obsession, and then back.

So there’s a lot packed into this book, and it’s highly readable although often “heavy” material. The sections about how Laymon saw black college students being harshly disciplined for minor infractions while white students got off with a slap on the wrist for much more serious crimes (or in one case, even pawned off their own culpability on unknown but totally scary people of color) was particularly hard-hitting to me. There’s a lot in the book that’s very raw, though told in an artful way by an author skilled at rhetoric. Much of it won’t be surprising to anyone who’s read much about race in America, but the author’s perspective makes a lot of sense.

It isn’t my favorite book of the year, perhaps because it isn’t written “for” me—Laymon writes about wanting to write for black people, which makes sense. Sometimes I found it a little confusing. At times in small ways: like many memoirists, Laymon leans heavily on brand names, which can be confusing if you don’t share the author’s pop-cultural background. And also in larger ways: the author seems to imply that his mother sexually abused him, but never explicitly says so even while he writes a lot about the need for radical honesty within his family, which tends to bury everything. In the end I wasn’t sure whether he was being cagey or I was reading in something that wasn’t there.

At any rate, this is a good book and well worth reading for anyone looking to read about race in America, or just looking for a good memoir.

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review 2020-08-08 06:09
Review: Born A Crime
Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood - Trevor Noah

This was amazing. I do not understand how there are people who thought this was bad. My first thought is that it's white people who just don't/won't get what growing up black is like, but I don't want to be that person.

 

As a black woman growing up in racist America, even I cannot imagine what it was like to grow up like Trevor did. Apartheid... I just can't imagine. I've experienced racism, but DAMN! I thought this was a brilliant story about his life and the fact that he was unapologetic made it that much better. Why should he apologize? And no wonder he turned to comedy. Yikes! His life was fully a humor, but sadness and fear were very prevalent. I cried when he spoke about his mother being shot and how he thought he had lost her. I was so angry that nothing was ever done about his waste of space step-father. The only parts I skipped were anything with the dogs being abused, or if/when they died. I cannot do animal abuse or death even if the death is just of old age.

 

Excellent listen.

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