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review 2017-04-28 01:48
Yes, please, thank you DC!
Suicide Squad (2016-) #16 - Rob Williams,Tomeu Morey,Tony Daniel,Sandu Florea

Thank you for not turning Superman into a Nazi.   (Although Red Son, although that was very clearly an AU.   Thank you for not turning him into a Nazi in the regular verse, then telling us all how amazing this is, and trying to get real people to dress up as nazis.)   Thank you for offering a non-politicized option since apparently the only other options seem to be leaning far to the left or far to the right. 

 

Thank you for focusing on characters and exciting stories and well drawn comics.   (And as much as I love Jim Lee and his details, I find myself far more drawn to Daniel's work as a penciler: a little smoother and less busy and I love the way he portrays Harley Quinn.)   More than that, I love the writing: the reason that Waller is going to Lex Luthor, for one.   I was surprised not only at what she wanted from him, but also why she wanted it.   It should have seemed obvious, but the storyline was dropped for a while and I thought even Waller wouldn't do this, even though they were setting it up from last issue.  I thought someone would talk her out of it, a certain superhero would discourage her, something, but not this...

 

Things are going to get so, so interesting for the Squad.   And I plan to be there when they do.   This issue also seems to be the first one that isn't broken up into two parts - and while it worked when they were doing background, at least for me, a lot of fans complained.   I don't know if that's what stopped them because they continued breaking it up, which I found a distraction when it seemed like they were really trying to tell one story in two parts once they'd dropped the backstories.   The real problem was that the two halves didn't necessarily line up as neatly as the writer tried to make them, at least not for me.   But with one, clean story, Williams has upped his game, and I'm finding myself most excited for this series for now.   

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review 2017-04-28 00:29
Deadpool, and marriage
Deadpool (2015-) #29 - Gerry Duggan,Salvador Espin,Reilly Brown

I kinda knew it would implode.   If anything, I'm shocked that it lasted this long and that his wife didn't storm off, or try to kill him and then storm off, or storm off vowing to kill him.   I also think the whole Shiklah/Dracula idea was bullshit in the beginning, so I didn't like bringing him back.   

 

Overall, it was just funny, though, and I particularly enjoyed the banter between Deadpool and Spider-Man.  I wanted to write a longer review, but I very suddenly don't feel like writing that much about Marvel. 

 

Can I lose myself in Vision, in the days that weren't Secret Empire.

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review 2017-04-28 00:04
Dr. Strange versus Wong
Doctor Strange (2015-) #19 - Jason Aaron,Chris Bachalo,Kevin Nowlan

Well, Misery has taken over Wong and is fighting Dr. Strange.   Still, it's hard when Wong knows all of Dr. Strange's secrets.   Also, the way that Strange beats Misery is heartbreaking, and his attempt to make things up to Wong are sweet, even if he doesn't get all the details right!

 

Love, love, love this series.   I'm crushed that Jason Aaron is leaving after next issue, and I may or may not get the post-Aaron run.   So many people get him wrong, and while I like what the new writer has done - I'm not 100% sure he'll nail Doctor Strange!

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review 2017-04-27 23:47
Loving this whole run!
Moon Knight (2016-) #13 - Jeff Lemire,Greg Smallwood

This is a detailed look into a man who is mentally unwell, the toll it takes on him, how he can persevere despite this and about him coming to terms with how unwell he is and how he wants to be better.   And it's a tough, draining read each month, but very, very worth it in the end. 

 

I see some of my own struggles in this title, and I know from reading some of the letters that others feel the same.   Lemire has done an excellent job, because despite all this, it's simply a story about hero.   There's action and bargaining and Moon Knight trying to save everyone he can, but it just turns out that 'everyone' includes himself this time around. 

 

And I've been criticizing Secret Empire, but at the same time saying 'I'm still reading Marvel because I think they're doing some important things elsewhere.'   I will most likely buy and read the tie-ins to Marvel for Secret Empire, but not the actual event.   (Because I love Doctor Strange and Deadpool and Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur, and I will read them regardless.   I am not getting into the new X-Men stuff because of the glut of it coming out, and because I'm still peeved over Secret Empire existing.   And the fact that it will be dominating the Marvel universe for the next year or so.   Y'know, usually I'm not fond of the 'and they wake up, and it's all a huuuuge nightmare' scenarios, but I'd take it over me waking up realizing that, hey, it's not a nightmare and Secret Empire exists.)  

 

But what I'm saying is that Moon Knight is one of the best thing Marvel is doing, showing us that people with mental health issues are, y'know, people and heroes and deserve to be seen as something more than just their mental health issues.   More than that, it's pushing for people to recognize that they want to be better, and actively trying to be, something I've been struggling with in particular recently.   And I am not ashamed to say that I nearly weep in relief after reading this each month.  'Nuff said.

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review 2017-04-27 01:12
Love, love, love!
Daredevil (2015-) #19 - Charles Soule,Marc Laming,Dan Panosian

Sorry guys, I got into this review, and realized I had a lot to say about the comic book industry, characters, and how people perceive people who want more diversity.   It all does tie into Matt Murdock/Daredevil eventually.

 

I was looking up Marvel's latest sales and recently fell into the hell hole of Brietbart when I clicked on a link, not realizing it led there.   I read some of the comments and felt a bit ill, but the guest is: they believe that anyone who wants diversity and progressive storylines also hates the thought of white men as superheroes - um, not true - or anything that's conservative.   (Matt Murdock, who also goes by the name Daredevil, the Man Without Fear, is Catholic.   The reason I bring this up is Christianity and traditional family values - which often correlate to religious values - seem to be under attack.)   I've been thinking about this, as well as some breakdowns of who buys what.   (Messier than it seems: female led titles, and people of color as leads do lead to a more diverse audience, but they can also appeal to white liberals.   Furthermore, women don't only buy female led titles.   As a teen, I picked up comics that were mostly mixed teams - with, yes, quite a few women - or that had male leads, like Wolverine, whose titles I slavishly bought and followed.)

 

I do enjoy diversity, particularly when written by diverse creators, as I feel it gives me a point of view that I haven't read.   But I enjoy a lot of white male superheroes; have since I got dragged into a comic store as a girlfriend of a boy who loved comics.  I saw zero appeal at the time, until I stumbled upon both X-Men and Wolverine.   Wolverine was my first comic book love, and you don't forget that; I still have soft spot in my heart for him, although I'm not quite as fond of Old Man Logan in general.   Daredevil was the superhero I ended up connecting with the most; I own a bust of him, and of no other superhero.   (I thought I was going blind when I was in the teens, and was so serious about this I learned braille.   Daredevil, as a blind superhero - despite his abilities pretty much erasing his disability - not only appealed to me, but in a lot of ways gave me comfort and helped me overcome my fear.)   At that point, I needed that: white, black, blue, or yellow, man, woman, trans, gay, straight, Jewish, Christian, whatever.  I didn't care.  I just wanted that blind superhero, I needed it desperately.  

 

I don't even want Matt Murdock changed or replaced.   While I enjoy the new Wolverine, Laura Kinney doesn't have the same nostalgia, didn't make the same connection with me, as Logan did.   I like my white, male superheroes.   But I like a lot of the women superheroes, the black superheroes, the Muslim and Jewish superheroes.   (I am Jewish, just full disclosure here.)   Matt Murdock is slightly more conservative than other superheroes because of his Catholic upbringing - but he's not imposing that on anyone.   It doesn't become preachy.   And while I understand that many other series, as well as Daredevil, have become too liberal for some readers, they only have to stop reading.  Should Marvel go to a heavy conservative, much less alt-right, position, no doubt they'll have liberals dropping titles.   They have instead made the choice to keep politics out of their titles.   Probably a smart move: I enjoyed comics before they became politicized as they have now, and I liked them after - mostly because they were mouthpieces for how I felt.   (A lot of comic writers are liberals.   I suspect the comics will lean that way, even if they aren't as politicized.  I do wonder what will happen to The Champions, which was a heavily liberal mouthpiece - and which I loved for making all the statements I loved.   Slightly worried, but I will simply stop reading if it gets too weird for me, say so, and then move on unless I'm asked about it in the future.  Or I suspect this will happen.)

 

And what's weird is now I feel like I have to defend myself: no, no, I can have a vagina and like male superheroes!  Or maybe explaining why I can be white, and liberal, and still like white heroes.   And the thing is: if superheroes weren't interesting, I wouldn't read them.  I stopped reading the black, female Iron Man because I had too little time and energy to keep up with yet another title, and because I was already more invested in heroes like Daredevil, Moon Girl, Blue Beetle, and the like.  (Same  with Infamous Ironman, which starred another white boy, but I found myself more interested in because of the villain-to-hero aspect, and why that happened and how it happened.)   But, yes, the point is: I can like what I like.   I'm a little unsettled by everyone trying to unpack what I like and bottling it up by race or liberal or not.   That's not how it works all the time.  I liked Logan because he had to struggle to keep cool, because he had interesting journey, and I liked DD because the blindness resonated with my own fears.  I like Moon Girl because she hangs out with a huge red dinosaur - at least at first.   Now I love her for being smarter than so many of her peers and struggling with that, because I did, too.   I like superheroes for various reasons.  Or I have holes that I fill with literature: emotional, mental, or just holes in my knowledge.   I use different titles to fill those and I can't always tell what will strike my fancy.  

 

This storyline - which has been going on for a couple issues - is a confessional - quite literally.   Daredevil is finally revealing how the Purple Man - or his children or both - managed to get the whole world to forget he's Daredevil.   Not only that, every time I think I have a bead on what's happening, it changes.   I'm loving being continually surprised, without feeling like anything that happens is nonsensical.   Most of this takes place in Matt Murdock's mind while Zeb Kilgrave tries to manipulate him into doing the worst thing he can think of.   It's quite telling.   

 

But the ending.  Ah, the ending is the real kicker. 

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