logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: hot-as-hell
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-10-14 12:10
Vintage Rescues! [Horror, teen, children 60s-90s]

It feels weird to me, too, but I guess we're now calling 90s things vintage. Ouch!

 

I was inspired by Paperbacks From Hell by Grady Hendrix and some awesome Instagram accounts to go on a hunt for some "vintage" books, from Horror, teen and children books.

 

Inspired by these accounts:

@booksuncovered [They judge books by their covers, but mostly post older, nostalgic type books.]

@vintagebooknerd [They post vintage books, obviously!]

@heylittlethrifter [She thrifts books and a lot are older, nostalgic books! She also has a Youtube channel under the same name.]

 

Disclaimer: Times were different when these were published. If you look into getting any of these, I am sure by today's standards, they are full of problematic, offensive material (even the children books!) Also, it would be a safe bet to say all the horror books have trigger warnings! I am mentioning the original publish date, not the date of any reprints.

 

I did something wild... I bought all these without looking up ratings and reviews, like people used to do back in the day.

 

Okay on to the show!

Here is what I found! 

 

An Old Friend of the Family [1979 - Dracula series #3 - Mentioned in Paperbacks From Hell]

The Children [1982 - Mentioned in Paperbacks From Hell]

Dominion [1982- Dracula series #5]

Spectre [1988]

Demon Within [1988]

 

 Fiends [1990]

 Billy [1990]

Candlenight [1991]

Twisted [1992]

Cutting Edge [1986]

 

The Perfume [1992]

Trapped: Cages of Mind and Body [1998]

The Accident [1991]

Don't Look Behind You [1989]

The Twisted Window [1987]

Stranger With My Face [1981 - Mentioned in Paperbacks From Hell]

 

 

The Dreamer [1996]

Humor - Horror - and the Supernatural [1968]

The Stepdaughter [1993]

Midnight Fright [1980]

My True Love Gave To Me [1993 - Scream series #5 (stand-alone series)]

The Scariest Stories You've Ever Heard Part 3 [1990]

 

 

The Immortal [1993]

The Party [1988 - Final Friends #1]

The Dance [1988 - Final Friends #2]

 

 

Mary Anne's Book [1996 - The Babysitters Club Portrait Collection]

Logan Bruno, Boy Baby-sitter [1991 - The Babysitters Club Special Edition]

Claudia's Book [1995 - The Babysitters Club Portrait Collection]

Sideways Stories from Wayside School [1978 - Wayside #1]

Sunny, Diary Two [1998 - California Diaries #6]

Wayside School is Falling Down [1989 - Wayside #2]

 

 

The Stranger I Left Behind [1989]

A Taste Of Smoke [1993]

The Secret Secret Passage [1992 - Clue #2]

The Whipping Boy [1986]

 

 

The Ghostmobile [1987]

Fourth-Graders Don't Believe In Witches [1989]

Secret Agents Four [1967]

Mystery of the Secret Dolls [1993]

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-13 00:04
What the hell did I just read?
The Devil at Saxon Wall - Gladys Mitchell

This was my second Mrs. Bradley mystery, after The Saltmarsh Mystery, and I think that I can say at this point that Mrs. Bradley is quite unlike any of the other golden age mystery series that I’ve read so far. The book begins with a long preliminary tale about the ill-fated Constance who marries the enigmatic, possibly psychotic, Hanley Middleton.

 

The first section of the book is identified as “First Manifestation: Domestic Interior,” which describes the abusive marriage of Constance and Hanley, and the ultimate death of Constance in child birth after she returns to her home in Saxon Wall, having previously fled back to her parents. Hanley follows Constance in death a short time later.

 

The second section of the book is titled “Second Manifestation: Conversation Piece“. I have no idea why it’s called this, actually, because there is precious little intelligent conversation in this book, and a whole lot of garbled confusion. At the beginning of the section, we are introduced to the main character of the book, one Hannibal Jones, described thus:

 

Hannibal Jones had earned a dishonest livelihood for seventeen years by writing sentimental novels. It was the less excusable in Jones to get his living this way in that he knew—none better, since he had lectured in Abnormal Psychology for a year or two in an American university before taking up his rather more nefarious career as author—that such novels as he wrote tended to encourage morbid daydreaming on the part of their readers, and that cooks and dressmakers, mothers of families, spinsters in all walks of life—even his own female relatives—were developing, because of him and his works, a Cinderella-complex of the most devitalising, time-consuming type.

 

Hannibal, who is quite rich as a result of his success as a writer, has some sort of a nervous breakdown when he accepts a large publishers advance for a book he doesn’t really want to write. He consults Mrs. Bradley, and she gives him advice to “get out your third-best car and travel until you find a sufficiently interesting and secluded village. Make yourself part of it. Study the people, but resolve never to write about them in a novel. Love them. Quarrel with them. Begin a lawsuit. Play village cricket.”

 

Somehow, he has the misfortune to end up in Saxon Wall, which must be the most terrible place in all of England, full of villagers who are downright creepy, baby-switchers, a psychotic vicar, and a drought which means that they are all, apparently, going to die of dehydration. Jones realizes that he is in the middle of some kind of devilish psychodrama and invites Mrs. Bradley in to help him solve the crimes, of which there are many.

 

The plot of this book made almost no sense. It was so convoluted that I couldn’t follow the thread at all, much less unravel it. Saxon Wall is a singularly horrible place, and the denizens of Saxon Wall are singularly horrible people. There wasn’t a single non-horrible person living there. Jones himself was confounding – why he didn’t just get in his car and drive the hell out of that place I cannot begin to imagine. Mitchell brings in witchcraft, folklore, and beer to add to the altogether strange tale. Mrs. Bradley shows up at about the 50% mark to untangle the skeins of the mystery, but even at the end I was left somewhat puzzled by everyone’s behavior.

 

“The temperament,” repeated Mrs. Bradley. “Yes, child. As good psychologists, we ought not to lose sight of that important item. The temperament for murder—an inexhaustibly interesting subject. I have it, you have it, the vicar has it. Mrs. Tebbutt has it, Doctor Mortmain has it. To how many other people in Saxon Wall would you say it has been vouchsafed?”

 

Everyone, dear reader. Everyone.

 

The third section contains some brief End Notes, which try to explain the book. They clear up a few things. But only a few things.

 

One of the most curious and interesting features of the general mentality, if such a term is permissible, of the inhabitants of Saxon Wall, was a noticeable inability to distinguish between essential good and essential evil.

 

I can’t say that I really enjoyed this book, but it did keep me interested, even if it was totally bananas.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-10-07 17:09
I got two awesome books that prove I'm a really eclectic reader!

I put in a special order at Barnes and Noble (because for some reason they didn't carry it in store!) for Paperbacks From Hell by Grady Hendrix and while I was at the store to pick it up, we had to go into the kids section to pick up a birthday gift for a 1-year-old.

 

I saw the Buffy the Vampire Slayer picture book based on the series created by Joss Whedon, with illustrations by Kim Smith. I had to have it! For me! I love horror, adult books, YA, middle grade and of course children books. I think even if my body breaks down over time, reading in this manner will help keep part of my mind young.

I'm such a dork. Both of these books are so cool!!

 

The back cover alone makes a Buffy fan happy! Look at the little attention to detail. When you read this, you have to remember it will be way different from the show. It has to be if they are marketing it for children.

I've only flipped through Paperbacks From Hell, but I've already seen some books I own or read, which is pretty neat!

Lupe by Gene Thompson is from 1977. I bought my copy in 2003 from a little used bookstore for $1. So I read it at 19 years old. From memory, this book freaked me out! I was pretty sheltered as a teen, even at 19, so this was probably considered a Taboo book to be reading with my relgious family. I imagine I hid it.

Creepy children...

My copy got a little beat up. I'm not too bothered by that. That just means this book has a history! Would I buy it again if I found a better copy of the first edition (and for cheap again... haha) I probably would if I read this again and still liked the story.

I tried to adjust the photo so you can see the faded text in the receipt! Not every day you find the original receipt tucked away.

 

As I read Paperbacks From Hell, I will keep track of which books I own, have owned and have read! (Oh, and of course the books I will want to hunt for and read! I know I will want to find the books with the covers the book shows, so my hunt might be harder.)

 

If you are a dork like me, you might look forward to my list, which I will share here. lol

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-10-07 13:50
Modern Masters
Legion: An Apocalyptic Horror Novel (Hell on Earth Book 2) - Iain Rob Wright

 

I got sucked into another series.

 

This one is a little repetitive, as most of it is the same story as the previous book except told from a different characters point of view.  Tedious in some cases, like the ship captains, interesting in others, as in the case of Vamps and his buddies.

 

New information is added as well from other characters so it's not a complete re-telling, as well as a GLARING contradiction from Daniel.

 

In book one, unless I'm mis-remembering (which is possible as numbers have a tendency to be floaty unless I wrestle them down and chain them up), there were 6,000 gates scattered across the world.  According to THE SAME GUY, there are 666 to correspond with the Adversaries of God, which have nothing to do with the angels that were banned from heaven. 

 

We'll see if the number changes in book 3.

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-10-05 16:38
Day 5 Books In The Freezer Readathon!

It is day 5 of the Books in The Freezer readathon. 5 challenges, 1 down, 1 halfway down.

 

I have read Frankenstein, the original 1818 text by Mary Shelly. Third time reading it. Still a 4 star rating. I have feelings, but I can't get a proper review down for this book. I will say, I am more on the "Monster's" side, though of course I don't agree some of the stuff he did, part of me can understand why he did those things, though.

27996082

 

I am 50% into The Woman in Black by Susan Hill

9825955

[I usually hate movie covers, and it is weird to have "Harry Potter's" face plastered on the cover, but I kinda like this cover.]

 

Next book on the agenda is Ordinary Souls by J.S. Bailey.

31127088

 

---

 

I'm really excited about the idea of reading spooky books during October. I say I love horror books, but my Goodreads would suggest otherwise because it is probably the genre I read the least. I want to broaden my horizons and read more horror and other books I don't automatically reach for.

 

Not related to this readathon, but my copy of Paperbacks from Hell is in at Barnes and Noble. I'm excited to buy it!

33670466

[How many books will this book make me put on my TBR?]

 

About the readathon:

Books in the Freezer is a podcast celebrating their 1 year anniversary.

 

A podcast discussing the deliciously disturbing world of horror fiction!

 

Owners of podcast (from their website)

Stephanie lives in Pittsburgh, PA with her husband, son, Beagle and cat. When she’s not working on the podcast, she makes YouTube videos, and watches horror movies (as research for the podcast of course!)

 

Rachel lives in Canada with her husband and hedgehog, Vegeta. She makes YouTube videos on her channel TheShadesofOrange where she reviews horror, thrillers, and sci-fi books.

 

---

 

Books In The Freezer Readathon - Oct 1-15th

 

  1. Read a horror book by a female author

[Frankenstein by Mary Shelley]

 

  1. Read a horror anthology or short story collection

[Ordinary Souls by J.S. Bailey]

 

  1. Read a horror book featuring or by an POC or LGBTQ+ person

[Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde]

 

  1. Read a horror book that has a movie adaptation

[The Women in Black by Susan Hill]

 

  1. Read a book we’ve recommended on the podcast

[The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson]

(spoiler show)

 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?