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review 2017-07-15 17:01
Review: "Road to the Sun" by Keira Andrews
Road to the Sun: May-December Gay Romance - Keira Andrews

 

~ 4.5 stars ~

 

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review 2017-06-30 14:39
Slow on the uptake
The Deadly 7 - Garth Jennings

Alright, I'll admit it. I'm often drawn to a book because of its cover. There's nothing wrong with that. Why else would they hire people to make them attractive and spend so much time designing them to be eye-catching? And then there's the blurb on the back of the book. These can range from evocative, cringeworthy, perplexing, or in some cases spoiler-y. Even after reading the back of the book jacket of today's book and seeing the title and looking at the cover image I was still surprised to discover just what this book was about. Maybe you're all smarter than me. Can you guess what Deadly 7 by Garth Jennings is about just from the name? What if I told you that it was about a little boy who had 7 little monsters accompanying him on a rescue mission and each of them had a very separate personality? The main character of Deadly 7 is Nelson who comes across a machine which creates 7 monsters that only he can see. One is always sleeping, one is angry about pretty much everything, one keeps stealing everything in sight...have you figured out what they are yet? I almost hope you haven't because then I won't feel like such a dolt. This is Garth's debut novel but he's no stranger to writing as he was the genius behind the movie Sing. However, this book is pretty much nothing like that movie. This story feels like it could be rooted in our present but with a decided twist. There's an ever-present feeling of dread while flipping the pages of this book which honestly I think that a lot of kids feel at this age. Remember the anxiety and fear when you realized that you were changing and you didn't know into what? Jennings taps into that and uses the monsters as a way to illustrate it which I think is rather brilliant. I have to say that the plot of this is kinda all over the place but the writing is solid so I have hope that further books by him will be tightened up and be even better. Nonetheless, it was a quick read and entertaining and I think it would be a good springboard for conversation. It's a solid 6/10.

 

PS Here's an article where Jennings talks about writing the book.

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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text 2017-06-02 01:46
Kiss the Girls
Kiss the Girls - James Patterson

So I'm already reading 3 other books but I randomly decided to read this one.  I couldn't sleep and reading didn't help.  I did learn something about the previous reader of this book though.  They must really like mustard because there are yellow fingerprints on several pages.  Thanks really.  

 

This book is pretty interesting so far and if I wasn't so tired I probably would have read the entire thing in one sitting.   

 

So how do people make a post that shows their reading progress?  I have seen several that show large letters at the top of the post that says where they are at in the book.  I thought when I updated and wrote a post that it would do it but it didn't.  That sucks.  I don't see magic buttons or switches etc. that look like they might be the ticket.  Someone tell me the magic words.

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text 2017-06-01 11:57
Book meme

I found this on Litsy and I can't get the photo that goes with the meme, even if Booklikes had let me post it, but I decided to do the meme anyway.

 

You've been kidnappted.

 

You can call on one fictional character to make a rescue attempt.

 

Who do you choose?

 

I choose Chrestomanci from Diana Wynne Jones' Chrestomanci series. Fortunately, I know how to call him. :)

 

In the comments on the Litsy post I found other great suggestions: The Doctor (I'd like to add Jack Harkness), Ranger from Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum books, Murtagh from the Outlander series (but I'd prefer Jamie, he would be great to look at too.)

 

 

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review 2017-05-03 00:08
Book 25/100: My Story by Elizabeth Smart
My Story - Elizabeth Smart,Chris Stewart

Like many of these, "I went through something harrowing" memoirs, this isn't something you read because you want great writing. The writing here is stilted and oftentimes repetitive, and I'm willing to be forgiving of that because it's important to tell the stories of regular, non-writer people who have been through extraordinary experiences, in as close to their own words as possible.

With that said, much of the storytelling in this recounting of the tale seemed to come from someone whose perception of the world had been stunted at the moment of her trauma -- not an unusual phenomenon, but one that Smart does not seem to acknowledge at all. She keeps referring to how she was "just a little girl" and "so innocent," which seems disingenuous to me since most teenagers don't actually think of themselves in those terms. She also seemed to hold on to a lot of very black-and-white thinking -- her captor, Mitchell, was "pure evil," while her family was seemingly perfect, nothing but loving and good all the time. There were also moments when she came across as somewhat self-righteous, but at the same time, I think it's the prerogative of a trauma survivor to hold onto some self-righteousness. It was clear that her faith in God and her beliefs about purity were deeply embedded parts of her psyche when she was kidnapped, so although it sometimes comes across as saccharine, I also felt that if this was true to her own experience of coping with the ordeal, it was appropriate to include.

I think that some people might be disappointed by how modest Smart was about the sexual stuff that took place while she was kidnapped -- she never goes into detail about the things that Mitchell did to her, made her do, or even the pornographic images he made her look at. I would say to those that are disappointed by the lack of detail in this regard should ask themselves why they are reading a book like this in the first place -- someone else's sexual exploitation should never be up for any onlooker to gawk at, and readers of this book are not "entitled" to peer in to every aspect of Smart's private hell. Instead, she went into great detail on many of the other aspects of living as a captive -- periods of starvation, conversations she had with her captors, stories they told her, all of which conveyed a clear enough picture of the desperation and hardship of her situation.

Although she insists again and again that she never developed any sort of feelings for her captives, it is interesting how Mitchell had brainwashed both Smart and his wife into total dependence on him. At one point he disappears for a week, and they go hungry during that time rather than venture into town on their own in search of food, even though nothing is really stopping them. (While Mitchell was around, he forbid them from going out in public, but he had such a hold on them that even while he was gone they obeyed this edict despite the fact that it could have literally killed them.)

The times when Smart comes close to being recognized or rescued only to remain in captivity are heartbreaking, and a good reminder to the rest of us to speak up or push back when she encounter something that seems "just not right." One of the best parts of this story, though, is that Smart plays a critical role in "saving herself" in the end. I wish all kidnapping stories could have endings that involve family reunions.

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