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review 2020-04-05 10:44
Trivia, or The Art of Walking The Streets of London
Trivia or the Art of Walking the Streets of London (1922) - John Gay,William H. Williams

Two stars only, despite the fact that the subject is London and I would really like to go there this summer but with Corona, it is unsure whether this will be possible!

To me, this felt like John Gay wanted to write an epic tale about, walking through London. There is loads of references to Greek Mythology and a lot of places in London are mentioned, but it is all rather random. Besides, the rhyming scheme felt forced, and although I am sure it is not easy to do, it did not feel right.

Not my style.

~Little Black Classics #107~

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review 2020-04-03 14:33
Seven Hanged
The Seven Who Were Hanged - Leonid Andreyev

Seven Hanged was exactly why I like the Little Black Classics! I had never even heard of the author, and the subject of the book was so dark (the final weeks/days of seven people condemned to death) but I really liked it.

Russian books always have this kind of depressing atmosphere, and Seven Hanged even more, but it really worked well for me. It was very interesting and also very sad, especially the end.

Recommended - but maybe not a good read at this time because it is slightly depressing.

~Little Black Classics #104~

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review 2020-04-02 09:44
Oroonoko
Oroonoko - Aphra Behn,Janet Todd

What I like about the Little Black Classics is that you are reading so many different authors, including ones that you had never heard of before encountering them in this series. Aphra Behn was one of those, and to be honest, reading about her was the most interesting part of this classic for me.

Aphra Behn was a woman far ahead of her time in the sense that she led a very interesting and independent life as -among others- a spy and wrote novels by the end of the 17th Century. So, Hooray for that!

Oroonoko is the story of an African prince (with a lot of European features it must be said) who is sold into slavery out of jealousy. While I thought the beginning of the novel was very good and interesting, it lost me half way. But nevertheless, I am glad I got to learn about Aphra Behn.

~Little Black Classics #105~

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review 2020-03-31 08:21
O Frabjous Day!
O Frabjous Day! - Lewis Carroll

I am not overly familiar with Lewis Carroll's work since I never liked Alice in Wonderland too much (the movies, never read the books). His poetry was completely new to me, but after I recently read Edward Lear's nonsense poetry (which was being compared as similar to Lewis Carroll) I was not looking forward to reading O Frabjous Day!. But, every week a Little Black Classics means reading one every week, so here we are.

My expectations were really low for this one, but I found it made at least way more sense than the Lear poems. Some of them still didn't resonance with me at all. But the hunting of the Snark was kind of nice, even though the rhyming was very nursery rhyme-y.

~Little Black Classics #106~

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review 2020-03-30 09:17
Nonsense
Nonsense - Edward Lear

This was utter nonsense!

I guess the title should have given fair warning, but I was still surprised at it. Maybe I was missing a lot, but I could not get anything out of these poems and was just hoping the book would finish quickly.

Really not my cup of tea.

~Little Black Classics 100~

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