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text 2017-07-20 07:56
East Van Saturday Night - submissions, round two

 

East Van Saturday - four short stories and a novella, has just been sent out to three more Canadian publishers.

 

The process began in November of last year when I decided that self-publishing another work (currently I've self-published eight novels and two plays) wasn't going to achieve what I wanted.

 

What do I want?

Critical, serious consideration for my writing and you're not likely going to receive that as an self-published author.

 

Why? Because it's now dead easy to self-publish and guess what, everybody's doing it. In 2015 alone, 625,327 ISBN numbers were issued for individual indie books.

 

In the past six months I've submitted to five publishers. If you think sending out submissions is easy, well, I guess it depends on what you're comparing it to.

 

Consider:

- publishers are obsessively specific about how your manuscript should be presented: what font style, what type size, margin widths, headers, etc.

- part of the submission package is to explain why you think your work is a good fit for them,

- you must provide details on how you're prepared to market your book,

- in most cases they will not accept simultaneous or multiple submissions,

- they won't let you know they received your submission,

- you are under no circumstances allowed to contact them in any way,

- they won't let you know if they reject your work, they'll just shred it, using "a secure process".

 

Okay, so it's not that difficult, it's just extremely annoying to have to deal with their arrogance - and that's without ever having the opportunity to speak with any of them.

 

To make it even more galling, in 2014-15 these guys (and gals) received $30 million dollars in Canadian government subsidies - that's my tax money.

 

And what exactly do they do for this money now that all the services: editing, cover design, production, marketing and distribution can be done by the author or purchased from experts relatively inexpensively?

 

One thing.

 

They're the gatekeepers to literary acceptance. If you're an indie author you're a joke, if your traditionally published you're accepted by the literati.

 

Not that I'll make any more money. Emerging authors are lucky to receive a fifteen percent royalty on traditionally published books.

So here we go again.

 

East Van Saturday Night - four short stories and a novella, are to some degree autobiographical and impart to the reader why you can take the boy out of East Van, but you'll never take East Van out of the boy.


Though the stories are all set in East Vancouver (with the exception of Hitchhike, which is a cross Canada misadventure during the "summer of love"), the themes have universal appeal and the music, the fashions and the culture are distinctly familiar to "boomers".

 

Stay calm, be brave, watch for the signs.

 

Amazon Author Page   https://www.amazon.com/-/e/B003DS6LEU

 

 

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-06-29 00:06
A Suitable Affair
A Suitable Affair (The Macalisters) - Erica Cameron-Taylor

My review contains spoilers and they're mostly my thoughts...

A Suitable Affair is Erica Taylor’s debut historical romance and book 1 of The Macalisters series. I do love well-written family sagas. When I went into this book, I didn’t know what to expect but glad to report that I emerged quite happy because the story and writing-wise, A Suitable Affair was wonderful.

In the beginning of the story, our H Ian and h Susanna met with quite a, uh, bang. Well, kind of a bang. She was strolling Hide Park with her soon-to-be fiancé Lord Riverton, while Ian was on the way to attend a meeting. And his horse almost collided with her, which could’ve been seriously bad but thankfully, it wasn’t. But it did introduce our H and h unofficially. Even from then I could tell these two are going to be a handful, their banters were already fun to read. True to that, I enjoyed most of Ian and Susanna’s banters to the fullest. After a while, you simply know these have to be together cause they’re going to have a lot of fun! :D

Susanna is one of the daughters of the Macalister family/Bradstone Dukedom, which somewhat reminded me of Julia Quinn’s Bridgertons. They have 10 siblings, now minus their eldest brother Sam, the heir to the Duke of Bradstone, who died in a carriage accident alongside their father. After Sam’s passing, the responsibilities of the Dukedom fell onto the next bother, Andrew, who wasn’t quite ready to shoulder it. This sudden and tragic transformation in their family took a toll on everyone, least of all Andrew, who had become distant and cold in the intervening years until he met Clara and fell in love. He’s now happily married to her. Susanna’s older sister, Sarah, was also married but now widowed. She’s got more brothers that I couldn’t keep a count on, 2 of them being overseas. Younger sister Norah has already had her come-out while the youngest, Mara is waiting. If all of them are getting a book each, we can safely say we’re in for quite a journey here!

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-06-10 00:22
The Ice Duchess
The Ice Duchess: Scandalous Regency Widows, Book 2 - Amy Rose Bennett

My review contains spoilers and they're mostly my thoughts...

This is what I thought in a nutshell. Looking at the reviews, I seem to be the minority here but it’s what it is. The Ice Duchess by Amy Rose Bennett wasn’t what I had anticipated it would be. I have been waiting for this one since I read book 1 of Scandalous Regency Widows, Lady Beauchamp’s Proposal. While I absolutely adored book 1, this did not hold my attentions for long.

Our h, Georgiana had a sad past, which made her so wary of men that she’d not fall in love or marry. Since she also didn’t want to spend her life as a spinster, Georgiana or Georgie as her family calls her, ended up marrying a good friend Teddy, who was also a Duke. But there was a secret to their marriage not everyone knew, and the few who did, never talked about it. Georgiana’s brother, Jonathan, is gay. And Teddy was his lover. With the taboo surrounding the whole thing, they had to find a way to continue on. Georgiana was eager to help too.

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text 2017-06-07 00:44
We want YOU! (not in a creepy way)

Would you like to be a judge for the prestigious 2017 RONE Awards? We have a few spots open! No need to write a review. Just read the books and score them. So much win! Make some indie authors happy. Come on, you know you want to! Apply HERE

 

Source: goo.gl/JXRfhB
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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-06-01 23:12
Ruining Miss Wrotham
Ruining Miss Wrotham (Baleful Godmother Historical Romance Series Book 5) - Emily Larkin

My review contains spoilers and they're mostly my thoughts...

I had been eagerly awaiting the 5th installment of Emily Larkin’s historical romance series, Baleful Godmother, titled Ruining Miss Wrotham for the past couple of months, and it was well worth the wait. For me, this has to be the best installment of this series! I had this feeling of profound happiness when it ended, that even with wanting to read a few more chapters, I was content with how it all played out.

The Baleful Godmother is a Regency-set series based on female characters who have special “gifts” or powers. But if you want to start from the very beginning, you can with The Fey Quartet. These are a set of novellas listed as “prologue” to this series. Set in Medieval-era England, the prologues explain exactly how our unique heroines come to

Books 1 and 2, Unmasking Miss Appleby and Resisting Miss Merryweather had something common in them apart from Baletongue, our dubious Fairy Godmother. Heroines of both of these books, Charlotte and Anne AKA Merry (respectively), were bestowed their gifts at the age of 25, which I thought was THE age they were supposed to have their wish fulfilled and 2. They were cousins so the stories were linked that way. However, the h of book 3 Trusting Miss Trentham, Letty, has had her wish fulfilled at 21. “Why” is explained in this installment as the h, Eleanor or Nelly, had her wish fulfilled at 23. The women, who were originally granted a wish each, were sisters, and our heroines simply descended from a different sister each, hence the age of their wish fulfillment differs from one another. Though Charlotte and Merry were cousins, Letty wasn’t even known to them at all. Same goes for Eleanor. Therein lies the uniqueness of this series, you never know to which direction the author is going to lead you. An element of surprise is always there.

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