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text 2019-01-17 19:25
TBR Thursday: January 17, 2019

I'm behind on my reviews and blogging, but here we are for TBR Thursday!

 

Last week, I read:

 

Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy Sayers; The Picnic at Hanging Rock by Joan Lindsey; Arrow's Flight and Arrow's Fall by Mercedes Lackey, The Chinese Shawl by Patricia Wentworth, both A Wrinkle in Time and A Wind in the Door by Madeleine L'Engle, and The Pale Horse by Agatha Christie. (No wonder I am behind in my posts - that's 8 books. Holy cow).

 

This week's plans:

 

Partners in Crime: A Tommy and Tuppence Collection - Agatha Christie  N or M? - Agatha Christie 

 

Looking ahead to next week, I am planning to work on the Tommy and Tuppence books that I've not read: Partners in Crime and N or M. I'm not psyched about these, mostly because I think that Christie's "thrillers" are her weakest books and these are both within that general wheelhouse. But, I'm going to complete her backlist, so here we go!

 

Our Spoons Came from Woolworths - Emily Gould,Barbara Comyns  Death of an Airman - Christopher St. John Sprigg 

 

I also have a couple of library books that I plan to read, including Our Spoons Came from Woolworths by Barbara Comyns, which is next up, and Death of Airman by Christopher Sprigg, from the BLCC series.

 

The Franchise Affair - Josephine Tey  Fortunes of War: The Balkan Trilogy - Rachel Cusk,Olivia Manning 

 

Finally, I'm putting The Franchise Affair by Josephine Tey and The Balkan Trilogy by Olivia Manning on my list of immediate reads! I already own both of them. The Balkan Trilogy is (obviously) a three book bundle published by NYRB classics - I own the kindle edition (it's over 900 pages long). And I have an old edition of The Franchise Affair that I picked up at the UBS with a different cover - I'll post a picture at some point.

 

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym has been pushed back to next week, for a BL buddy read! Join us if you can - use the tag pymalong!

 

I've also started working on my first Project Night Night charity quilt, and I should have a finished quilt to show you next week. For now, here's a preview!

 

The fabric pull:

 

 

The pieced & basted quilt:

 

 

Happy reading, everyone!

 

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text 2019-01-11 19:34
Proposed buddy read
Excellent Women - Barbara Pym

Themis-Athena, Murder By Death & I are planning a Buddy Read of Barbara Pym's Excellent Women to tentatively begin on Friday, January 25.

 

Plot summary: 

 

Excellent Women is one of Barbara Pym's richest and most amusing high comedies. Mildred Lathbury is a clergyman's daughter and a mild-mannered spinster in 1950s England. She is one of those "excellent women," the smart, supportive, repressed women who men take for granted. As Mildred gets embroiled in the lives of her new neighbors--anthropologist Helena Napier and her handsome, dashing husband, Rocky, and Julian Malory, the vicar next door--the novel presents a series of snapshots of human life as actually, and pluckily, lived in a vanishing world of manners and repressed desires.

 

Barbara Pym was born in 1913 and died of breast cancer in 1980 and Excellent Women was originally published in 1952.

 

According to Wikipedia:

 

"several strong themes link the works in the Pym canon, which are more notable for their style and characterisation than for their plots. A superficial reading gives the impression that they are sketches of village or suburban life, and comedies of manners, studying the social activities connected with the Anglican church (Anglo-Catholic parishes in particular.) (Pym attended several churches during her lifetime, including St Michael and All Angels, Barnes, where she served on the Parish Church Council.)

 

Pym closely examines many aspects of women's and men's relations, including unrequited feelings of women for men, based on her own experience. Pym was also one of the first popular novelists to write sympathetically about unambiguously gay characters (most notably in A Glass of Blessings).  She portrayed the layers of community and figures in the church seen through church functions. The dialogue is often deeply ironic. A tragic undercurrent runs through some of the later novels, especially Quartet in Autumn and The Sweet Dove Died."

 

In 2013, The Telegraph published an interesting piece for Pym's centenary, which can be found here.

 

If any of this sounds interesting, feel free to join us!

 

Participants (so far):

 

Moonlight Reader

Themis-Athena

Murder By Death

BrokenTune

Lillelara

The Better To See You My Dear

Person of Interest

Peregrinations

 

Honorary participate: Mike Finn

 

Let's use "pymalong" and "excellent women" to tag our posts!

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