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text 2018-01-08 02:16
Reading progress update: I've read 250 out of 430 pages.
Truly Madly Guilty - Liane Moriarty

 

I was reading this book last night before bed. When I tried to sleep, I couldn't - probably due to that late afternoon espresso (not a good choice). But, as I was lying there trying to sleep, my mind wandered to the book. And suddenly I had an idea what happened at the barbecue. The clues are all there, but I'm not sure if I'm right yet.

 

This book is similar to Pretty Little Lies in that an event occurred and we hear about the characters lives before and after the event with little pieces of what actually happened that night sprinkled in between. 

 

It's a bit annoying because I really want to know what happened...

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review 2018-01-06 04:07
How to (Almost) Ruin Your Summer
How to (Almost) Ruin Your Summer - Taryn Souders

 

 

Someone once told me that money can't buy happiness. They obviously never had to ride a baby bike to the first day of middle school.

-opening lines

 

Chloe is determined to earn money this summer (maybe by babysitting). What she didn't plan for is her parents deciding to send her to career camp. There she will have the opportunity to see what it's like to be a cake decorator, athlete, scientist, or veterinarian. Well, Chloe knows for sure she doesn't get along with animals, by maybe she could work with the cake decorating thing. But, life has other plans... Between spiders, a goat named King Arthur, a rude girl named Victoria, and Director Mudwimple, Chloe's summer is looking ruined. But luckily Chloe meets a friend, a bouncy girl named Paulie (who Chloe nicknames Pogo), and finds out two of her friends from home are also there, Nathan (her secret crush) and Sebastian.

 

The story is told through Chloe's experiences and nightly journal entries. Chloe is relatable and the drama seems pretty accurate for a bunch of middle school aged girls living in a cabin together. Chloe's friendship with Pogo and the difficulties with the bully Victoria seem to be accurate portrayals of middle school relationships. Chloe doesn't always make the right choice, but in the end, she does the right thing. I read this quickly in one sitting and I think 4th through 8th graders will enjoy it.

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review 2017-12-18 00:14
THE WIFE BETWEEN US BY: GREER HENDRICKS & SARAH PEKKANEN
The Wife Between Us - Greer Hendricks,Sarah Pekkanen
Well, I feel like the blurb totally called it. 
 
"When you read this book, you will make many assumptions."
 
 
 
I had a lot of assumptions at the beginning of this book, and only one thing turned out to be true. Which I kinda can't tell you, because it would spoil all the fun. I even heeded the warning like blurb. I went into this one totally suspicious of EVERYONE. In the end I think that actually made this whole story even more fun. I was juggling at least 4 different theories on what was ACTUALLY happening, and none of those was what it ended up being. This was one hell of a plot twist and I imagine it is going to knock a lot of socks off! It surely got me! 
 
 
Part one was a little slower going, but still interesting getting a thorough examination of the characters and a glimpse at their relationships. It painted a really full foundation in your mind that is inevitably rocked down to its core in part two. I feel like the full picture at the end of the book was much more comprehensive because of it. The last half of the book is unputdownable. Once everything starts to shift it is nearly impossible to put down until the very end. And the authors have more than one surprise up their sleeves in this tale, so this is the book that just keeps on giving. 
 
 
I really enjoyed The Wife Between Us, I hear it will be coming to the big screen too and I am looking forward to watching that when it comes out. I'll definitely be on the lookout for more from these authors. 
 
Many thanks to St. Martin's Press for an ARC of this book! 
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review 2017-12-01 22:42
nine, ten: A September 11th Story
Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story - Nora Raleigh Baskin

 

This book follows four children from diverse backgrounds in the days leading up to the attacks on September 11, 2001, their experiences that day, and where they are one year later. Rather than focusing on the horrific events of the day, the book instead focuses on the children's individual lives, dealing with everyday issues, including mourning the death of a parent, fitting in with peers, and moving to a new school. It is a good book to read aloud to a class to spark discussions of the events of the day and how they changed our world.

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review 2017-12-01 16:09
Little boys at war
The Red Badge of Courage - Stephen Crane,Alfred Kazin

Today's book is a classic that I have wanted to read for quite some time but never got around to...until now. Stephen Crane's The Red Badge of Courage covers the American Civil War from the point of view of a Union soldier. It's the gritty portrayal of life at the front and just what it's like to lay down your life for a cause that you don't fully understand. In fact, our protagonist has almost no clue what it is that he's fighting for or against. He joined up because it was the done thing which seems to be the case for the rest of his regiment as well. There are those that brag about their bravado but when the time comes for the bullets to fly they are the first to turn and run. At first, our soldier is condescending towards these 'cowards' as he sees them but he very quickly sees the futility of their regiment's actions as they seem to be merely feinting and arbitrarily gaining and losing ground. It is a gritty, raw description of battle and defeat which is undercut with confusion and fear. These are children playacting warfare but the injuries and death are very real. Crane's insistence on not holding back lends a realistic, deadening of the senses feel to what it's like on the battlefield when you are surrounded by death and horror at every turn. He was making a commentary on the futility of war and how those who are a part of the 'war machine' are generally lost as to the meaning of why and who they are fighting. I am immensely glad that I finally picked this book up and gave it a read. I encourage ya'll to do the same. It's a slim volume and will take no time at all (though I don't promise you'll want a break every now and again from the bloodshed). 9/10

 

Here are a few more covers which I thought were worth sharing because they tell slightly different stories (and illustrate the point that covers do matter):

 

This one screams patriotism. Source: Goodreads

 

 

Yes, that is a bald eagle. [Source: Waldina]

 

 

Just so you get the message. [Source: Goodreads]

 

 

And my fave because RAINBOW. [Source: Amazon]

 

What's Up Next: Science of the Magical: From the Holy Grail to Love Potions to Superpowers by Matt Kaplan

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Slightly Foxed: Issues 50-53

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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