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text 2016-05-02 13:00
April Wrap-Up & May Reading List
A Ghost In The Machine - Caroline Graham
The Nine Tailors - Dorothy L. Sayers
Murder in Baker Street: New Tales of Sherlock Holmes - Jon Lellenberg,Martin H. Greenberg,Daniel Stashower
The Black Country - Alex Grecian
For Dead Men Only: An Alexandra Gladstone Mystery - Paula Paul
NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity - Steve Silberman
The World's Finest Mystery and Crime Stories: 4: Fourth Annual Collection - Ed Gorman
Infinite Jest - David Foster Wallace
Lord of Chaos - Robert Jordan
Wish You Well - David Baldacci

April Wrap-Up

 

I completed eight books in April. Here's the breakdown:

 

5 stars: 1

The Annotated Sherlock Holmes Volume II by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

4 stars: 0

 

3 stars: 5

Death of a Hollow Man by Caroline Graham

The Secret of High  Eldersham by Miles Burton

The Yard by Alex Grecian

The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett

The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett

 

2 stars: 2

Death in Disguise by Caroline Graham

Veronica's Grave by Barbara Bracht Donsky

 

Reviews: 8

 

I participated in Dewey's 24 Hour Readathon this month and managed to read 2 1/2 books during the 24 hours. I also finally finished adding all my books to Leafmarks.

 

May Reading List

 

I'm treating May as my cleanup month. The books that I didn't get to in March and April are on my reading list this month.

 

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text 2016-04-28 12:11
Steve Silberman Endorsement – The Eagle Tree

 

“The Eagle Tree is a gorgeously written novel that features one of the most accurate, finely drawn and memorable autistic protagonists in literature. The hero of the book is like a 14-year-old Walt Whitman with autism, seeking communion with the ancient magnificent beings that tower over the landscape around Olympia, Washington. Ned Hayes plays with the conventions of the unreliable narrator so that you end up feeling like March is a very reliable narrator of glorious and terrifying aspects of the world that neurotypicals can’t see. Credible, authentic, powerful. A must-read.”

 

Steve Silberman, New York Times bestselling author of NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity, winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction.

Source: theeagletree.com
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text 2016-04-04 14:28
March Wrap-Up & April Reading List
Death In Disguise - Caroline Graham
A Ghost In The Machine - Caroline Graham
The Nine Tailors - Dorothy L. Sayers
Murder in Baker Street: New Tales of Sherlock Holmes - Jon Lellenberg,Martin H. Greenberg,Daniel Stashower
The Yard - Alex Grecian
The Black Country - Alex Grecian
The Secret of High Eldersham - Miles Burton
For Dead Men Only: An Alexandra Gladstone Mystery - Paula Paul
NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity - Steve Silberman
The World's Finest Mystery and Crime Stories: 4: Fourth Annual Collection - Ed Gorman

 

March Wrap-Up

 

March wasn’t as a great a month as I thought it would be -- too much overtime, too little sleep. I read nine books in March and here's the breakdown:

 

5 Stars: 1

Sherlock: Chronicles by Steve Tribe

 

4 Stars: 2

The Killings at Badger's Drift by Caroline Graham

Death in the Tunnel by Miles Burton

 

3 Stars: 4

Death of a Hollow Man by Caroline Graham

The Dragon Throne by Chrys Cymri

Relativity by James Swallow

Superman: Secret Identity by Kurt Busiek, Stuart Immonen

 

2 Stars: 1

The Force Awakens by Alan Dean Foster

 

1 Star: 1

The Apple Tart of Hope by Sarah Moore Fitzgerald - I'm still kind of angry about this one.

 

Reviews: 9

 

DNF: 1.5

Planet X - This is already in a pile ready to be donated or passed off to my nieces if they want it.

The Indomitable Ten - I plan on giving this book one more chance before writing it off. I might start on the short stories in the back and work my way forward.

 

I didn’t get to Lord of Chaos in The Wheel of Time series. I had planned on reading it toward the end of the month, but I made the mistake of picking up The Indomitable Ten first and it kind of killed my desire to read anything too intense or long, ditto for Infinite Jest. I did not complete the second volume of The Annotated Sherlock Holmes -- I have a little more than 200 pages left to go. I’ve also been slowly duplicating my library and reviews on Leafmarks based on the recommendations from both Murder by Death and Bookstooge’s Reviews on Board. Thanks guys!

 

 

April Reading List

 

My reading list for April isn’t too set in stone. I'm in the mood for Mystery right now, so most of my TBR is made up of that genre. Of course based on previous experiences, I'll plow through 5 or 6 books and then decide I need some Fantasy or Sci-Fi. Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon is April 23rd (two days before my birthday) and I have a tentative list, but that might change once again, depending on whether or not I burn out on Mystery earlier in the month.

 

 

 

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review 2015-09-02 00:00
NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity
NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity - Steve Silberman "Parenthood" the TV show shed more light on ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder which includes Asperger) than this very long book did. If your interested in ASD, I would recommend that show instead. Max, the Asperger character on the show, demonstrates more about life on the Spectrum than this book does. I remember the scene where Max is running for class president and his sister tells him why he is so special, along the lines that he is totally focused, sees the world differently and never needs to get along just in order to get along. Also, Max and his interaction with Hank (played by Ray Ramono), the photographer, and how the photographer knows how to interact instinctively with Max because Hank obviously is on the spectrum too.

As for this book, the author gives the history of the Disorder and our understanding by putting the events into the context of the time, but doesn't really relate them to our current understanding. For example, he brings up someone named Jenny McCarthy early in the book, somebody like most Americans I had never heard about before she started linking Autism with vaccines. I for one, think that Dante should put into his Eighth circle of hell (Fraud) people like Jenny McCarthy (and by extension Jim Carrey) because that's were they belong for the misery they bring to the world for the fraud they are perpetrating upon us. The author does reject the anti-vaccine idiots in the later part of the book, but I don't think he mentioned Jenny McCarthy (may she greet other vaccine deniers in the eighth circle of hell) by name in the later part of the book.

The author spends a lot of time on the pseudo-scientific Freudian like psychoanalysis that led to things such as "refrigerator moms" causing Autism (always blame the victim, or if you can't blame them, blame the mother). I really enjoyed the book, "Shrinks: The Untold Story of Psychiatry". There's a lot of overlap between these two books. Except "Shrinks" would relate what was historically being done wrong to what was finally being done right. This book doesn't do that.

The author also had a long section on how Engineers, Sci-Fi enthusiast, nerds in general are almost always people on the spectrum and how fortunate they are to be on the spectrum (as for me, I don't believe those kind of people are almost always on the spectrum, but I could be convinced with data but none was provided). The book does point out that neuro-typicals can be considered a Disorder just as easily. After all, who wants to always want to be conforming for the sake of conforming, valuing social interaction over ones own company, or never being able to understand the details that make up the whole. All in contrast to the neuro-diverse who don't fully understand the rules of the game for conforming, get their strength while being alone, and are able to understand the details and logically pull apart the pieces that make up the whole, but there is a price to be paid to be a nerd on the spectrum especially when you are young, and for the young conformity is everything and to think different(ly) makes you not fit in and later on that emotionally oriented thinking process that you possess limits you to understanding emotions only by clues you see in the physical world not from the internal states of others or yourself.

I thought "Shrink" covered how psychiatry corrected itself better than this book covered how the science of autism corrected itself. There is a lot of overlap between the two in the sense that both books show how American Psychiatry (and Psychology) got off the rails with psychoanalysis (Freudian thought) and ended up correcting themselves by changing the paradigms they were using. When a science such as psychology doesn't relate their paradigms to the real world, the science ends up becoming a pseudo-science. That's what happened with the science of Autism (and psycho-analysis). The problem with this book is it dealt mostly with the false paradigms and didn't dwell enough on how the science has corrected itself. Watch "Parenthood" instead.
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review 2010-12-15 00:00
NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity
NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity - Steve Silberman library copy
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