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review 2017-10-16 02:52
The Girl in the Tower
The Girl in the Tower - Katherine Arden

Katherine Arden does not disappoint with this second installment of her Winternight Trilogy. It seamlessly continues the story of Vasilisa as she strives to find a place for herself in a world that does not take kindly towards change and independence, despite its desire to forget the unfathomable traditions of the past. While this is a book where the charm of magic and pagan mystery tries to maintain a steadfast hold, it also does not shy away from the very personal issues of identity and belonging, as well as delve into the broader concerns of power, politics and duty.

I think that duty becomes one of the main conflicts within this story, as the characters begin attempting to reconcile their sensibilities and personal wishes with the eventual need to follow through with the tasks and responsibilities they are expected to fulfill. This holds true for both women and men, as the reader witnesses with both Vasya and her brother Sasha, as well as many of the other characters met over the course of the novel. The reader is also presented with the alternative, the individuals who have already had to assume their respective roles, forced to learn to adapt and derive a sense of pleasure from the various situations within their control.

There is a lot of truth presented in this book, and Arden does not attempt to provide simple answers to many of the questions and issues that arise. Magic can only go so far in supporting the natural order of things.

This is truly an excellent work, and I personally can’t wait for the next installment.

Copy provided by NetGalley

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review 2017-10-13 10:52
Brief Rambles: The Murders in the Rue Morgue
Murders in the Rue Morgue, The: The Dupin Tales - Edgar Allan Poe

The Murders in the Rue Morgue

by Edgar Allan Poe
C. Auguste Dupin, #1 (short story)

 

 

**I read this short story as part of a collection, The Essential Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, that I picked up at a library sale months ago.  I'm kind of glad that I remembered I had it, because I couldn't quite figure out what to read for the 'Genre: Horror' square--although, I'm not entirely sure The Murders in the Rue Morgue seems very horror-like, even though it is tagged as such on Goodreads.

 

I might read another couple Poe short stories from this volume to make up for it if this particular one doesn't really ring as horror.

 

 

As for the story...


I'm going to be honest, I totally didn't see that one coming.

I have to admit, this is my first actual reading of a story by Poe, though I have read some of his poems.  Being that poems aren't really my thing, I'm ashamed to say that I never truly comprehended his work and kind of wrote him off as over-hyped, classical, high school required reading.

Truthfully, I found The Murders of the Rue Morgue extremely engaging.  The beginning was a bit slow to build up, but once Dupin began his deductions and analysis of the murders, I couldn't stop reading.  It was easy to follow where his deductions were heading, and when it "dinged" in my head, at the same time as it did for the unnamed narrator, I was, at first a bit taken aback... and then I didn't know what to think.

To be honest, the conclusion that Dupin comes to, as well as the final reveal, kind of requires quite a bit of suspension of disbelief.  It was a little over the top.

This short detective story was quite the experience and a nice read for Halloween Bingo.  I'd admit though, even though this book is tagged as horror, I don't know if it really feels like horror--though the murders were pretty gruesome.  There was quite a bit of detail and I might of made a face at the description of Madame L'Espanaye's... mutilated body.

On a side note, Dupin kind of reminds me of Sherlock Holmes (what little I've read of the famous detective), both in demeanor and arrogance.


***

 

Halloween Bingo 2017


This book would also count for:

  • Locked Room Mystery
  • Murder Most Foul
  • Amateur Sleuth
  • Classic Horror

 

 

Source: anicheungbookabyss.blogspot.com/2017/10/brief-ramble-murders-in-rue-morgue.html
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text 2017-10-11 12:35
Blog Tour: Tales From the Hollow by Cecile Teller and Fae Harlow with Excerpt and Giveaway

 

Today’s stop is for Cecile Teller and Fae Harlow’s Tales From the Hollow. We will have info about the book and author, and a great excerpt from the book, plus a great giveaway. Make sure to check everything out and enter the giveaway.

Happy Reading :) 


Tales from the Hollow is a collection of two novellas that take place in the town of Fey Hollow.

  Blood Falls by Fae Harlow Vampire Christopher Brandon keeps mortal Hazel Abbot at a comfortable distance. The accident-prone human is an unlikely potential, and while he can't allow her to come to harm, he's desperate to maintain the space between them. When danger begins to stalk Fey Hollow and Hazel appears to be at its center, they must trust in the bond they share or risk losing more than their lives.  

Blood, Skin, and Bones by Cecile Tellier Crow shifter Odoacer has spent the last twenty five years working and living in Fey Hollow. Despite the usual Vampire presence he has had no excitement other than collecting his valuable treasures. That is until he meets Sive during the Hollow's supernatural holiday gathering. Part Witch, Part Vampire, and all trouble she has come to town to celebrate and inadvertently may have brought chaos down on all Odoacer holds dear. Together they will work together to combat a darkness that is threatening to take over the town, and possibly find more than they bargained for in each other, if they can survive.

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Buy Link

Amazon

 

Excerpt from Blood, Skin, and Bones:

“Well that’s good, I don’t want to have raccoon breath after I break my rule.” She couldn’t resist any longer, the draw she felt to him was strong. Sliding her legs over his she sat on his lap straddling him. His cheeks warmed slightly and she could have sworn he blushed. “Which rule are you breaking? Not that I’m complaining.” His hands slid to her hips and squeezed gently. “My kissing on the first date rule, I’m going to grandfather this date in as the second date since I spent the night already.” Leaning forward she touched her lips to his softly and shivered at how something so simple could light up her senses. Acer’s mouth was instantly devouring hers. She felt his fingers tighten on her hips and moaned into his mouth. Acer took that opportunity to slide his tongue between her lips and swirl it against hers. The urge to press down against him was high and his encouraging groan as she did only increased the need. Acer broke the kiss and rested his forehead against hers. “I don’t know how many rules you are willing to break tonight, but if it is only the one I do not know that continuing this path is wise.” “You’re right, I’m sorry if I’m being a tease. I didn’t mean for things to go that far...though I don’t regret a moment.” She was seconds away from breaking every rule she had when it came to him. Sive knew that she had those rules in place for a reason though and didn’t want to deviate too much even if he was heat on two legs. “I do not regret, I can be patient.” He ran his nose against hers and kissed her lips gently, sipping at her bottom lip and nipping it lightly. The whimper that left her lips was neither dignified nor her usual controlled response. “I’m worried that I won’t be able to be. You’re too good at this, you ought to come with a warning label.”

 

 

Cecile Tellier holds Masters degrees in Special Education as well as Criminal Justice: Law. She lives in upstate NY with her husband and two children. She got her start in writing as early as high school and has been published in poetry anthologies and freelance erotica . Cecile is part of a wonderfully supportive critique group lovingly referred to as the Round Robbins. Cecile believes that everything in life that can be accomplished should and has endeavored to live up to this whether it was starting a flat track Roller Derby league or writing the next great romance novel.

Links

Website *** Facebook Personal *** Facebook *** Twitter *** Instagram *** Amazon *** Goodreads

 

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

Follow the tour HERE for exclusive excerpts, guest posts and a giveaway!

Source: snoopydoosbookreviews.com/blog-tour-tales-hollow-cecile-teller-fae-harlow-excerpt-giveaway
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text 2017-10-08 22:41
Detection Club Bingo: My Progress So Far
Murder of a Lady (British Library Crime Classics) - Anthony Wynne
The Tales of Max Carrados - Ernest Bramah,Stephen Fry
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books - Martin Edwards

 

Chapter 1, A New Era Dawns: Ernest Bramah - The Tales of Max Carrados

Chapter 5, Miraculous Mysteries: Anthony Wynne - Murder of a Lady

 

The book that started it all:

Martin Edwards - The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books

 

The Detection Club Reading Lists:
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: The "100 Books" Presented
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 1-5

The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 6 & 7
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 8-10
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 11-15
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 16-20
The story of Classic Crime in 100 Books: Other Books Mentioned, Chapters 21-24

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review 2017-10-08 22:21
A Blind Sherlock Holmes
The Tales of Max Carrados - Ernest Bramah,Stephen Fry

 

Ernest Bramah's tales of the independently wealthy, blind amateur detective Max Carrados were once featured in Strand Magazine alongside Arthur Conan Dolye's Sherlock Holmes stories, and jointly with those and R. Austin Freeman's Dr. Thorndyke narratives they carried the distinction of having been singled out by George Orwell as "the only detective stories since Poe that are worth rereading."  Yet, like so much of Golden Age crime fiction their reputation didn't survive their own time, and once more it is thanks to Martin Edwards that I have discovered them ... though a resounding shout-out is due to Person of Interest for pointing me to this delicious audio version narrated by Stephen Fry.

 

Carrados has lost his eyesight as a consequence of a riding accident; he is suffering from the type of blindness known as amaurosis, i.e., vision loss that occurs without an apparent lesion affecting the eye.  (And yes, I looked that one up.)  Due to this fact, and also because he has since trained his other senses to replace his lost visual faculties, Carrados's blindness is not always immediately spotted by his interlocutors, and Bramah has great fun setting up these types of situations over and over -- a bit too much fun for the sake of credibility, in fact:  Martin Edwards quotes Bramah as having intended to highlight the "extraordinary achievements of blind people over the years," making special note of the fact that "many of the realities of fact have been deemed too improbable to be transferred to fiction."  Yet, Bramah's intent was quite obviously also to create a blind "great detective" in the same league as Sherlock Holmes -- whose methods of detection and sudden pronouncements of a solution that has been obvious to him alone while everybody else is still (figuratively) groping about in the dark are strikingly similar to Carrados's ... or rather, vice versa -- and in his intent to combine detective superpowers with an apparently severely crippling impairment Bramah overshoots the mark occasionally.  Only rarely do we  experience Carrados as much at the mercy of his seeing opponents as in the last story contained in this collection, "The Missing Witness Sensation."

 

Nevertheless, Bramah's style is engaging and the stories, which in this collection range from 1914 -- the year of Carrados's first appearance -- into the 1920s, are great fun to follow along, particularly of course when narrated by the one and only Stephen Fry.  (If it hadn't been for him I'd have given this collection a 4-star rating, but that just simply wouldn't have done justice to Fry's reading.  So only a half-star reduction remains to mark the fact that Carrados's faculties on occasion strain credibility.)  Not all of the mysteries concern murder; again like Sherlock Holmes, Carrados -- who in addition to being a detective is also an expert in numismatics -- is also called upon in particularly devious instances of theft and fraud.  And once more like the denizen of 221b Baker Street, Carrados has his Watson, a disbarred-lawyer-turned-professional-private-detective named Carlyle (a former school fellow of Carrados's; they meet again in their respective changed circumstances in the very first story, "The Coin of Dionysus," where Carlyle consults Carrados in his numismatic capacity, only to briskly unveil the would-be-detective), as well as a valet and driver named Parkinson, who very helpfully has a photographic memory. -- The stories are told from a third person narrative perspective, however, and neither Carlyle nor Parkinson appear in every single one of them.

 

In the context of the Detection Club bingo based on Martin Edwards's Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books, this fulfills chapter / square 1, "A New Era Dawns."

 

In the context of the Halloween bingo, this would match the "Amateur Sleuth," "Murder Most Foul" and "Darkest London" squares; some of the stories would also qualify as "Locked Room Mysteries."

 

The Detection Club bingo card:

 

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