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review 2017-12-08 15:47
Mennyms in the Wilderness, Mennyms # 2 by Sylvia Waugh
Mennyms in the Wilderness - Sylvia Waugh,Patrick Benson
A recent trip to Philadelphia brought me to a wonderful small bookstore where I found a complete set of The Mennyms in hardcover! So I got to read the rest of their story much sooner than I anticipated.

The Mennyms had weathered the (false) alarm of a visit from Aunt Kate's nephew, in fact Magnus and receiving a life-interest in their long-time home. but it is soon followed by a much more distinct threat to their safety: the wrecking ball. They receive a notice that their house, their whole quiet street in fact, must make way for a new road.

Help arrives, with a supernatural nudge, in the form of a relative of Aunt Kate's: Albert. Albert, a young man, is drawn into the Mennym's small world and becomes enchanted by them. He initiates a plan to help save their home, and when the outside world's curiosity threatens them, he brings them to a remote country house.

What really impresses me about this series is that Waugh really gave a lot of thought to the many complications that a living doll family could face. The simple solutions to their problems always have a catch that get picked up on. There are thorny issues like a modern bureaucracy catching on to the fact that the same 'man' has leased a property for 60+ years, for example.

The psychology of the Mennyms is complex as well. Its pointed out that for years, decades, at a time the Mennyms follow the little patterns of their pretends. They area static, but then a single change in their daily lives leads to experience and 'growing' up. Appleby and Pilbeam in particular face all of the pangs of being on the cusp of adulthood, forever. The danger of Albert, a person, being involved in the life of the Mennyms after the crisis of the outside world ends, leads to the inevitable conclusion.

Previous: The Mennyms

Next: Mennyms Under Siege
 
 
 
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text 2017-12-05 17:34
Exciting December Releases! (TBR)
The Girl in the Tower - Katherine Arden
The House on Foster Hill - Jaime Jo Wright
The Ladies of Ivy Cottage (Tales from Ivy Hill) - Julie Klassen
Bad Behavior - Kiki Swinson,Noire
Ziegfeld Girls - Sarah Barthel
His Secret Son (The Westmoreland Legacy) - Brenda Jackson

Very excited for these December releases. Almost all of these books are by authors I have read and enjoyed their work. Considering it is December, I think I will be able to get all six books read. The Girl in the Tower is book two in The Winternight Trilogy so, I will need to read The Bear and the Nightingale first.

 

 

 

December 5

 

 

The Ladies of Ivy Cottage (Tales from Ivy Hill #2) by Julie Klassen

 

The Girl in the Tower (The Winternight Trilogy #2) by Katherine Arden

 

His Secret Son (The Westmoreland Legacy) by Brenda Jackson

 

House on Foster Hill by Jaime Jo Wright

 

 

December 26

 

 

Bad Behavior by Kiki Swinson and Noire

 

Ziegfeld Girls by Sarah Barthel

 

 

 

If at all possible I will try to read books in my personal library that are 150 pages or less. Have an awesome reading month friends and Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah and Happy Kwanzaa.

 

 

 

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review 2017-12-04 23:46
Strange but True Tales of Car Collecting - Keith Martin,Linda Clark,SportsCarMarket.com

A fun book. Can you imagine, inheriting some property from a relative, opening the garage door and finding an old car worth millions of dollars? This book has that story, plus many, many others that are just plain fun to read.
I would suggest this book for serious car buffs. There is a lot of detail that just plain went over my head.
My only complaint on the book is the lack of good photographs. Perhaps it is because I received it as an ebook from NetGalley, and future hard copies of the actual book will have them?

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review 2017-12-03 02:19
Fresh familiar and lesser-known fairytale retellings with a focus on interiority
Brave Red, Smart Frog: A New Book of Old Tales - Rohan Daniel Eason,Emily Jenkins

Disclaimer: reviewing an uncorrected proof/eARC via NetGalley.

This covers some well-known (Little Red Riding Hood, Hansel & Gretel, Snow White) and lesser-known fairytales with the author's unique spin and a sketched piece of artwork heading each tale. The author's notes suggest that she focused on motivation, which jives with my impression that these retellings are a little more focused on character motivation and interiority than some traditional versions, with perhaps a splash of feminism/female initiative. I did enjoy them, but placed alongside recent retellings-with-a-twist/twisted fairytales like Ransom Riggs's and Leigh Bardugo's, they come across a little bland. The language is not particularly gripping or lyrical (not picture-book style), and with one illustration heading each tale, it's not a child's bedtime book. However, as kids lit/MG, they're a nicely rounded-out variation.

I'd have liked to see more of a storybook-format with more illustrations for child readers (& those of us who just enjoy the pictures~~), but generally a nice edition.

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review 2017-11-29 10:15
Through the Woods by Emily Carroll
Through the Woods - Emily Carroll

I think I found a new favorite book. No, really! I meant to read this graphic novel during Halloween since I heard from many people that it's quite the spooky read. Unfortunately, Life happened and I didn't get around to reading it until now. And I am so glad I did! It's everything I love in a horror graphic novel and more! I stood up till five in the morning reading this and I was quite spooked, especially with that last story!

 

Through the Woods is a collection of five horror stories accompanied by grotesque art to add to the scary elements, and it works great together. Emily Carroll did a fantastic job of keeping each story straight to the point and the reader always on the edge of their seat. Each story takes some inspiration from fairy tales and the true horrors each one contains. I will not tell you anything about the stories themselves because it's supposed to be scary. If I tell you anything about them then that gives away the suspense factor. Horror is a genre best going in blind so trust me when I say that there's something spooky in here for everyone to enjoy. The last story really made my skin crawl. *BA DUM TSSS*

 

The art is fantastic! I've already touched on this a little bit, but if you are someone who likes their horror more visual, then read this book. Carroll's artwork is beautiful but when it comes to creeping out the reader, she is not afraid to enter into the world of the macabre. There's blood and murder and grotesqueness all over this book so if you are squeamish,  you might want to skip this one. But if the violence doesn't bother you, then I highly recommend you read this book!

 

It's fast, action-packed, beautiful, and horrifying. If you love reading horror, then I think you should pick up this graphic novel. It's perfect for the dark and colder nights this time of year! I hope you enjoy this story collection as much as I did!

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