logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: women-writers-bingo
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-16 03:43
Light on romance, heavy on mystery
The Red Carnelian - Phyllis A. Whitney

I'm going to use this one for the "W" square in the Women Writer's Bingo Project. Originally published in 1969, this is a fairly early effort in Whitney's transition away from juvenile fiction into adult gothic style romance. It's set in a Chicago Department Store during the glory days of the window display industry. One of my favorite aspects of the book was this deep dive into the narrow historical moment during which window displays in department stores were a place for copywriters and artists to get paying work that got a lot of attention.

 

The main character, Linell, is a copywriter at Cunningham's, a Chicago Department Store. I pictured the old fashioned, multi-story department store, like Macy's, that took up a whole city block. Linell's former fiance, Michael Montgomery, who goes by Monty, is returning from a honeymoon with a different woman, after basically dumping Linell and running away. The book opens to the heroine trying to figure out how best to deal with the fact that the two of them, and his new wife, are all going to be working at Cunningham's.

 

It quickly becomes clear that there is trouble in paradise between Monty and his new bride, and by about page 35, someone has taken a golf club to Monty's head. I certainly can't say that he didn't deserve it, because he was clearly a total d-bag. 

 

This is really a closed circle mystery. It's well plotted, and there is a romantic sub-plot involving Linell and another young male employee at Cunningham's that isn't particularly convincing. There is one pretty solid suspenseful scene that occurs when Linnel is wandering around the mannequin storage area. 

 

At this point, I think that Open Road has reissued most, if not all, of her adult gothics. I found this one fairly enjoyable, but I think I'd like to dip my toe in one of her historicals next - I'm thinking Skye Cameron or Thunder Heights.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-01-15 23:35
Women Writers Bingo / Project: Tracking Post

 

Read:

A - Margery Allingham: The Crime at Black Dudley, Mystery Mile, Look to the Lady, Police at the Funeral, Sweet Danger, Death of a Ghost, Flowers for the Judge, The Case of the Late Pig, Dancers in Mourning, The Fashion in Shrouds, Traitor's Purse, and The Tiger in the Smoke (all new)

B -

C - Agatha Christie: The Moving Finger (revisited on audio)

D -

E -

F -

G -

H -

I -

J -

K -

L -

M - Ngaio Marsh: Death in a White Tie (revisited on audio)

N -

O -

P -

Q -

R -

S -

T -

U -

V -

W - Ethel Lina White: The Lady Vanishes (aka The Spinning Wheel) and The Spiral Staircase (aka Some Must Watch) (new)

X -

Y -

Z -

 

Free / center square:

 

On the card, I am only tracking new reads, not rereads.

 

Read, to date in 2018:

Female authors: 16

- new: 14

- rereads: 2

 

Male authors: 2

- new: 2

- rereads:

 

F & M mixed teams / anthologies:

- new:

- rereads:

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-14 22:42
Well, I can see the appeal to movie directors ...
The Lady Vanishes & the Spiral Staircase (Wordsworth Classics) - Ethel Lina White,Keith Carabine
The Lady Vanishes - Ethel Lina White
Some Must Watch - Ethel Lina White

... but in written form, this isn't really my cup of tea.  Which isn't necessarily the fault of White's writing is such -- she has a fine eye (and ear) for characterization and language -- but rather, of her chosen topic.  I've never been much of a fan of "women in peril" stories; they tend to be replete with fevered agitation and hyperbole, and however understandable the protagonists' fear and excitement may be in a given situation, the situation as such is almost invariably so unrealistic as to be the literary equivalent of "B movie" material.

 

That being said, Hitchcock definitely milked The Lady Vanishes (which was originally published as The Wheel Spins) for all it was worth and then some -- in fact, this is one of the rare examples where I decidedly prefer the movie over the book: not only because Hitch gave the story a spin that isn't present in the literary original at all (even if that doesn't make the story one iota more realistic -- it's just plainly more fun), but chiefly, because Michael Redgrave's version of Iris's (the heroine's) knight in shining armour is decidedly more likeable than the character from the book, who -- even though he's meant to be likeable -- to me just comes across as one hugely condescending a$$hole, hardly any better than the professor in whose company he travels.  Similarly, Iris herself is more likeable as portrayed by Margaret Lockwood in the movie: whereas there, I am genuinely sympathetic to her strange plight, the book mostly elicited my rage at her fellow passengers' reactions -- however not on Iris's behalf specifically but on behalf of womanhood generally, against a society that automatically disbelieved and put down as hallucinations and figments of an overactive imagination any woman's assertions that weren't supported -- or that were even directly contradicted -- by other witnesses, especially men and / or figures of authority.  (In fact, if I hadn't read Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper, biographical background information included, I'd have dismissed the whole premise of The Lady Vanishes as wildly improbable.  Sadly, at the time of its writing, it wasn't.)

 

The Spiral Staircase (originally published as Some Must Watch) combines a remote country house setting on the Welsh border with a serial killer story; and if the isolation of the house and the prowling maniac weren't enough in and of themselves, the whole action takes place over the course of somewhat less than 12 hours, mostly after nightfall.  I haven't seen any of the several movie adaptations of this story, but I can see how a clever director would be able to ratchet up the tension quite skillfully here, what with the dwindling down of effective defenses against the maniac and a cast of fairly outlandish (and unlikeable) characters inside the house -- if you buy into the premonition that this house is where the serial killer is headed next, and that he is after the book's heroine, to begin with.

 

I liked The Spiral Staircase a bit better than The Lady Vanishes -- 3 1/2 vs. 2 1/2 stars, respectively, which averages out to 3 stars for both together.

 

The Spiral Staircase (under its original title Some Must Watch) is mentioned as an example of a country house mystery in Martin Edwards's The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books, so I'll be counting that towards the corresponding square of my Detection Club bingo card, and both books, in addition, also towards the Women Writers Bingo.

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-10 21:00
Mr. Campion of 17A Bottle Street, Piccadilly, London
The Tiger in the Smoke - Margery Allingham,David Thorpe
The Fashion in Shrouds - Margery Allingham,Francis Matthews
Flowers for the Judge - Margery Allingham
Sweet Danger - Margery Allingham
Mystery Mile - Margery Allingham
Dancers in Mourning (Albert Campion Mystery #8) - Margery Allingham
Police at the Funeral - Margery Allingham
Death of a Ghost - Margery Allingham
The Case of the Late Pig - Margery Allingham
Look to the Lady - Margery Allingham

I started the new year with a minor Allingham binge and, having now read a fair number of her Campion mysteries (12, i.e. 2/3 of the 18 novels that she herself completed), I think I can safely say that while I won't ever like this series as much as I do those of Christie, Sayers, and Marsh, when Allingham is good, she is really good and can easily measure up to the other Golden Age "Queens of Crime."

 

Campion starts out as a fairly thinly-drawn cipher in The Crime at Black Dudley, but that is due to the fact that Allingham wasn't initially intending to make him her main detective: he was her publisher's preference over the character that Allingham herself had had in mind as the lead.  So, in the following novels, she willy-nilly had to put some more flesh onto his hitherto meager bones, and pronto.  Unfortunately, she didn't do likewise for the plots (nor for her books' other characters), which in books 2 and 3 (Mystery Mile and Look to the Lady) remain variations on the same theme -- a treasure hunt with murder interlude, complete with an international crime syndicate led by a master criminal, various abduction schemes, and supporting characters so unrealistic and twodimensionally cardboard they'd go up in flames if you only held a lighter vaguely in their direction. 

 

That said, in book 2 (Mystery Mile) already Allingham did come up with one of the greatest sidekicks ever in the history of mystery writing -- Campion's "gentleman's gentleman" Maggersfontein Lugg, who (being an ex-burglar) is anything but gentlemanlike -- and even by the time she wrote this book, she had already made great strides towards finding her style, and she'd definitely also learned a thing or two about tightening up a meandering plot.

 

The first one of her books that I really enjoyed (or had, on an earlier occasion, even though I didn't revisit it for this particular exercise) is book 4, Police at the Funeral: There still is a bit too much of a "woman in distress" element for my liking at the very beginning of this book, but essentially it's a classic country house mystery with a clever plot and a cast of unusual characters that are definitely showing signs of being more rounded than their confrères of the earlier novels -- the whole thing could easily give Agatha Christie a run for her money (even though the solution won't surprise anyone who knows their Conan Doyle and Christie tolerably well).

 

With book 5, Sweet Danger, we're back, alas, to the "treasure hunt with murder interlude and crime syndicate led by a master criminal" plot phenomenon, this time even with one of the Golden Age's most overused tropes thrown in (a tiny fictitious principality in the Balkans as the origin of the unsavory doings on British soil), all of which by this point had me thorougly gritting my teeth.  What elevates this book (somewhat) above its earlier predecessors, however, are its characters; first and foremost, then-17-year-old Lady Amanda Fitton, who even at that age is completely Campion's equal and manages to bowl him over completely in no time at all.  (She'd return in several subsequent novels and eventually end up as his wife; not without first having taken up a careers as a mechanic engineer.)

 

Book 6, Death of a Ghost, is based on an ingenious idea, set in the arts world, featuring a range of fairly over the top (although not necessarily always likeable) characters and, though Campion tumbles to "whodunnit" fairly early on, the "howdunit" and "whydunit" are far less clear.  One of my favorite installments from the bunch that I've read so far (albeit speaking from memory -- I haven't revisited this one recently, either ... I probably should).

 

Book 7, Flowers for the Judge, begins like a classic Golden Age locked room mystery set in the world of publishing: halfway into the story it becomes clear we're on a sort of treasure hunt yet again (or rather, on the hunt for a manuscript that may or may not exist and provide a vital clue to the murder), but it's clear here that the manuscript is merely a tool and Allingham's chief interest is in the characters -- one in particular --, so I'm willing to forgive Allingham for (semi-)falling back on her favorite ploy here.  (Also, I really like the ending, which provides a twist that rather made me smile, and which for a Golden Age mystery is anything but P.C.)

 

Book 8, The Case of the Late Pig, is an oddity in that it's told from Campion's point of view -- what with its distinctly outlandish plotline and the exchanges between Campion and Lugg it reads like Allingham's take on Jeeves and Wooster (though it's less clear who is supposed to be who), with another locked room puzzle thrown in for good measure and, like in Death of a Ghost, some monkey business associated with a (not-so) dear departed.  I rather liked its twists when I first read it; I've only ever revisited it on screen since, though, where the different narrative point of view isn't as apparent as in print.  Probably I should reread it at some point to see whether the first person narrative voice bothers me more now that I've read more books of the series overall.

 

Book 9, Dancers in Mourning, is Allingham's visit to classic Ngaio Marsh territory -- the world of the London stage --, combined once more with a country house setting.  At this point Allingham is very assured in creating interesting characters and a plot that holds together (also, this book is firmly within established Golden Age traditions), all of which makes for a rather enjoyable read. -- Side note: This is also the last book in which Campion is shown as unlucky in love with one of the story's female characters; in this particular instance, a married woman, which makes for quite a bit more depth than his previous forays into the territory of romance, mostly with the sisters and daughters of his friends and / or clients.

 

Book 10, The Fashion in Shrouds, sees Campion reunited -- of sorts -- with Amanda Fitton, who is now working as an engineer: what starts as a (purported) ploy of Amanda's designed to disentagnle her employer from the married star actress he has fallen in love with ends up with Campion and Amanda taking the first steps towards a bona fide union.  Topically, this is Allingham's take on career women; besides Amanda and the aforementioned vampish actress, the third woman on whom the story focuses is is Campion's sister Valerie, co-owner and chief designer of a fashion house.  In approach and execution, this novel is nowhere near as accomplished as Dorothy L. Sayers's Harriet Vane novels (particularly Gaudy Night, which was published three years before The Fashion in Shrouds) -- and the only truly independent and self-assured female character is Amanda, as well as Campion and Valerie's "Tante Marthe", the co-owner of the fashion house -- but I suppose given its publication date, it's worth mentioning that Allingham is placing career women center stage in a (mostly) favorable light at all.

 

Book 11, Traitor's Purse, to me is a hot mess; a fallback of the worst kind into Allingham's early "treasure hunt with assorted villainy" plotlines, replete with incomprehensible decisions on Campion's part that not even a head injury can satisfactorily explain away (in fact, in light of that head injury they're even more inexplicable), cipher characters, and a thoroughly implausible plot.  Seems Allingham, like Christie, got caught up in the "5th column" / "enemy at home" noise echoing through Britain (like through most, if not all European countries) in WWII, when this book was published; and again like Christie, she just simply didn't know enough about the world of espionage to pull it off convincingly.

 

Books 12 and 13 (Coroner's Pidgin and More Work for the Undertaker) are, as yet, on my TBR -- I don't know when I'll get around to them, but after this recent little binge, I doubt it will be anytime soon.

 

Which finally brings us to Book 14, The Tiger in the Smoke; in terms of characterization and atmosphere undoubtedly one of Allingham's strongest -- at least of the first 14 Campion novels.  Yet again we find about halfway through the book that we are on a treasure hunt, but for once even the villains -- and we know who they are almost from the get-go -- are fully rounded characters with an inner life and both a past and a present (albeit not much of a future if it's down to Campion and the police).  Campion's Scotland Yard sidekick of the earlier books, Stanislaus Oates, has climbed the career ladder all the way to the top, so the day to day police work is now being done by a very sympathetically drawn and, again, fully rounded new character, D.C.I. Charles Luke (side note: like Amanda's path from teenager to career woman to (now) Campion's wife and equal opportunity "lieutenant", another instance showing that unlike Christie, Allingham allowed her characters to age in real time).  And towards the end of the book, just before the final resolution, we even get a finely-drawn downright Dostoevskyan exchange between a priest and the worst of the bad guys that a younger Allingham might have given her eye teeth to write, but would not have been able to pull off anywhere near as accomplished. What's not to like?!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-11-29 22:30
Women Writers Bingo: Tentative Reading List

 

OK, this is basically an extract from my bookshelves (both TBR and read -- "read" where I've already read other books by the same author and am interested in further exploring her work), with the addition of some more or less iconic women authors who have so far escaped my notice.  This ought to keep me busy for the next couple of years, I think ...

 

A

  • Alice Adams
  • Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  • Louisa May Alcott
  • Tasha Alexander
  • Isabel Allende
  • Margery Allingham
  • Julia Alvarez
  • Jessica Anderson
  • Donna Andrews
  • Mary Kay Andrews
  • Maya Angelou
  • Hanna Arendt
  • Elizabeth von Arnim
  • Mary Astell
  • Thea Astley
  • Kate Atkinson
  • Margaret Atwood
  • Jane Austen

 

B

  • Beryl Bainbridge
  • Pamela Ball
  • Sandra Balzo
  • Chitra Banerjee Divakarumi
  • Muriel Barbery
  • Pat Barker
  • Djuna Barnes
  • Linda Barnes
  • Nevada Barr
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  • Vicki Baum
  • Simone de Beauvoir
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • Aphra Behn
  • Lauren Belfer
  • Josephine Bell
  • Gioconda Belli
  • Marie Belloc Lowndes
  • Carol Lea Benjamin
  • Margot Bennet
  • Isabelle Berrubey
  • Barbara Beuys
  • Victoria Blake
  • Enid Blyton
  • Margaret Bourke-White
  • Elizabeth Bowen
  • Dorothy Bowers
  • Pamela Branch
  • Christianna Brand
  • Charlotte, Emily & Anne Brontë
  • Geraldine Brooks
  • Nancy Marie Brown
  • Pearl S. Buck
  • Fanny Burney
  • Jessie Burton
  • A.S. Byatt
     

C

  • Margaret Campbell Barnes
  • Dorothy Canfield
  • Joanna Cannan
  • Charity Cannon Willard
  • Angela Carter
  • Miranda Carter
  • Vera Caspary
  • Helen Castor
  • Willa Cather
  • Catherine of Siena
  • Eleanor Catton
  • Suzanne Chazin
  • Andrée Chedid
  • Tracy Chevalier
  • Marjorie Chibnall
  • Laura Childs
  • Kate Chopin
  • Agatha Christie
  • Marchette Chute
  • Sandra Cisneros
  • Susanna Clarke
  • Ann Cleeves
  • Barbara Cleverly
  • Colette
  • Artemis Cooper
  • Mairead Corrigan Maguire
  • Hannah Crafts
  • Marie & Eve Curie
  • Helen Czerski
     

D

  • Elizabeth Daly
  • Clemence Dane
  • Tsitsi Dangarembga
  • Edwidge Danticat
  • Alexandra David-Neel
  • Diane Mott Davidson
  • Lindsey Davis
  • Natalie Zemon Davis
  • Barbara Demick
  • Anita Desai
  • Emily Dickinson
  • E.M. Delafield
  • Joan Didion
  • Isak Dinesen (Karen / Tania Blixen)
  • Emma Donoghue
  • H.D. (Hilda Doolittle)
  • Susan Doran
  • Kirstin Downey
  • Ruth Downie
  • Evelyn Doyle
  • Margaret Drabble
  • Sarah Dunant
  • Dorothy Dunnett
  • Marguerite Duras

 

E

  • Maria Edgeworth
  • Jennifer Egan
  • George Eliot
  • Anne Enright
  • Nora Ephron
  • Louise Erdrich
  • Jenny Erpenbeck
  • Margaret Erskine
  • María Amparo Escandón
  • Laura Esquivel
  • Janet Evanovich

 

F

  • Lygia Fagundes Telles
  • Linda Fairstein
  • Anne Fadiman
  • Jerrilyn Farmer
  • Elena Ferrante
  • Rosario Ferré
  • Helen Fielding
  • Erica Fischer
  • Fannie Flagg
  • Judith Flanders
  • Jane Fletcher Geniesse
  • Gillian Flynn
  • Moderata Fonte
  • Sarah Foot
  • Amanda Foreman
  • Earlene Fowler
  • Anne Frank
  • Lois P. Frankel
  • Ariana Franklin
  • Antonia Fraser
  • Marilyn French
  • Tana French
  • Esther Freud
  • Alexandra Fuller
  • Margaret Fuller
  • Anna Funder
     

G

  • Diana Gabbaldon
  • Mavis Gallant
  • Janice Galloway
  • Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Elizabeth George
  • Stella Gibbons
  • Frances Gies
  • Anthony Gilbert (Lucy Beatrice Malleson)
  • Janet Gleeson
  • Kristin Gleeson & Moonyeen Blakey
  • Molly Gloss
  • Lisa Goldstein
  • Carol Goodman
  • Nadine Gordimer
  • Charlotte Gordon
  • Sue Grafton
  • Caroline Graham
  • Anna Katherine Green
  • Kerry Greenwood
  • Germaine Greer
  • Lady Augusta Gregory
  • Susanna Gregory
  • Kate Grenville
  • Aceituna Griffin
  • Nicola Griffith
  • Martha Grimes
  • Sarah Gristwood
  • Judith Guest
  • Ursula K. Le Guin
     

H

  • Brigitte Hamann
  • Barbara Hambly
  • Denise Hamilton
  • Edith Hamilton
  • Sheila Hancock
  • Helene Hanff
  • Lorraine Hansberry
  • Kathryn Harkup
  • Joanne Harris
  • Cynthia Harrod-Eagles
  • Mavis Doriel Hay
  • Eliza Haywood
  • Anne Hébert
  • Elke Heidenreich
  • Lillian Hellman
  • Kristien Hemmerechts
  • Amy Hempel
  • Sandra Hempel
  • Jennifer Morag Henderson
  • Christine Heppermann
  • Georgette Heyer
  • Susan Higginbotham
  • Mary Higgins Clark
  • Patricia Highsmith
  • Hildegard von Bingen
  • Susan Hill
  • Laura Hillenbrand
  • Lisa Hilton
  • Tami Hoag
  • Antonia Hodgson
  • Frances Hodgson Burnett
  • Beatrice Hohenegger
  • Renate Holland-Moritz
  • Susan Howatch
  • Zora Neale Hurston
  • Siri Hustvedt
  • Elspeth Huxley
  • Hypathia of Alexandria
     

I

  • Laura Ingalls Wilder
  • Susan Isaacs
  • Molly Ivins

 

J

  • Shirley Jackson
  • Lilian Jackson Braun
  • Miranda James
  • P.D. James
  • J.A. Jance
  • Tove Jansson
  • Lisa Jardine
  • Inge Jens
  • Ianthe Jerrold
  • Sarah Orne Jewett
  • Elizabeth Jolley
  • Erica Jong
  • Rachel Joyce
  • Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz
  • Julian of Norwich
     

K

  • Frida Kahlo
  • Ellis Kaut
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin
  • Susanna Kearsley
  • Helen Keller
  • Faye Kellerman
  • Margery Kempe
  • Christine Kenneally
  • Hannah Kent
  • Jamaica Kincaid
  • Laurie R. King
  • Barbara Kingsolver
  • Helen J. Knowles
  • Rachel Knowles
  • Clea Koff
  • Elizabeth Kostova
  • Nicole Krauss
  • Aug San Suu Kyi

 

L

  • Marie Laberge
  • Mary Ladd Gavell
  • Carmen Laforet
  • Selma Lagerlöf
  • Jhumpa Lahiri
  • Lorna Landvik
  • Nella Larsen
  • Carole Lawrence
  • Camara Laye
  • Laurie Lee
  • Tanith Lee
  • Charlotte Lennox
  • Donna Leon
  • Doris Lessing
  • Andrea Levy
  • Marina Lewycka
  • Amy Licence
  • Astrid Lindgren
  • Leanda de Lisle
  • Clarice Lispector
  • Elizabeth Little
  • Ivy Litvinov
  • Norah Lofts

 

M

  • Sharon Maas
  • Margaret MacMillan
  • Karen Maitland
  • Abby Mann
  • Erika Mann
  • Katia Mann
  • Elisabeth Mann-Borghese
  • Olivia Manning
  • Katherine Mansfield
  • Hilary Mantel
  • Beryl Markham
  • Monika Maron
  • Ngaio Marsh
  • Megan Marshall
  • Sujata Massey
  • Doris Maurer
  • Daphne du Maurier
  • Margaret Mazzantini
  • Mari McAuliffe
  • Susan Carol McCarthy
  • Helen McCloy
  • Sharyn McCrumb
  • Carson McCullers
  • Colleen McCullough
  • Val McDermid
  • Alison McGhee
  • Maureen F. McHugh
  • Pat McIntosh
  • Shirley McKay
  • Patricia McKillip
  • Paula McLain
  • Catherine Meadows
  • Lise Meitner
  • Rigoberta Menchú
  • Anne Meredith
  • Claire Messud
  • Anne Michaels
  • Rosalind Miles
  • Margaret Millar
  • Marja Mills
  • Anchee Min
  • Denise Mina
  • Gladys Mitchell
  • Margaret Mitchell
  • Nancy Mitford
  • Miyuki Miyabe
  • Theresa Monsour
  • Rosa Montero
  • Lucy Maud Montgomery
  • Anne-Marie-Louise D'Orleans Montpensier
  • Lorrie Moore
  • Susanna Moore
  • Wendy Moore
  • Elsa Morante
  • Toni Morrison
  • Toni Mount
  • Bárbara Mujica
  • Alice Munro
  • Lady Murasaki Shikubu
  • Iris Murdoch
  • Tamar Myers

 

N

  • Barbara Nadel
  • Meera Nair
  • Sylvia Nasar
  • Shizuko Natsuki
  • Marguerite de Navarre
  • Irène Némirovsky
  • Katherine Neville
  • Anaïs Nin
  • Ingrid Noll
  • Elizabeth Norton
  • Amélie Nothomb
  • Mary Novik
  • Frances Noyes Hart
  • Tiina Nunnally

 

O

  • Joyce Carol Oates
  • Tea Obreht
  • Edna O'Brien
  • Carol O'Connell
  • Flannery O'Connor
  • Sandra Day O'Connor
  • Nuala O'Faolain
  • Margaret Oliphant
  • Emmuska Orczy
  • Mary Orr
  • Anna Maria Ortese
  • Perri O'Shaughnessy
  • Elsa Osorio
  • Isabel Ostrander
  • Helen Oyeyemi
  • Ruth Ozeki
  • Cynthia Ozick

 

P

  • Tina Packer
  • Sara Paretsky
  • Sandra Paretti
  • Dorothy Parker
  • I.J. Parker
  • S.J. Parris
  • Rachel Pastan
  • Ann Patchett
  • Jill Paton Walsh
  • Renee Patrick
  • Sharon Kay Penman
  • Louise Penny
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  • Régine Pernoud
  • Anne Perry
  • Ellis Peters / Edith Pargeter
  • Nancy Pickard
  • Jodi Picoult
  • Hazel Pierce
  • Tamora Pierce
  • Marge Piercy
  • Christine de Pizan
  • Jean Plaidy
  • Sylvia Plath
  • Sarah B. Pomeroy
  • Elena Poniatowska
  • Katherine Anne Porter
  • Linda Porter
  • Beatrix Potter
  • Susan Power
  • Helen Prejean
  • Annie Proulx
  • Barbara Pym
     

Q

  • Anna Quindlen

 

R

  • Lea Rabin
  • Ann Radcliffe
  • Carol Daugherty Rasnic
  • Pauline Réage
  • Kathy Reichs
  • Ruth Rendell
  • Barbara Reynolds
  • Lucy Ribchester
  • Dorothy Richardson
  • Henry Handel Richardson (Ethel Florence Lindesay Richardson)
  • Brenda Rickman Vantrease
  • Stella Rimington
  • Margaret Rivers Larminie
  • Candace Robb
  • J.D. Robb
  • Mary Roberts Rinehart
  • Marilynne Robinson
  • Roxana Robinson
  • Judith Rock
  • Hilary Rodham Clinton
  • Katrin Rohde
  • Nelly Rosario
  • Colette Rossant
  • Christina Rossetti
  • Roswitha von Gandersheim
  • Laura Joh Rowland
  • J.K. Rowling
  • Arundhati Roy
  • Gabrielle Roy
  • Priscilla Royal
  • Joanna Russ
  • Harriet Rutland
  • Sofie Ryan
     

S

  • Vita Sackville-West
  • Jehan Sadat
  • Françoise Sagan
  • Angela Saini
  • George Sand
  • Cora Sandel
  • Elisabeth Sanxay Holding
  • Sappho
  • Beth Saulnier
  • Dorothy L. Sayers
  • Andrea Schacht
  • Harriet Scott Chessman
  • Lisa Scottoline
  • Alice Sebold
  • Anna Seghers
  • Annemarie Selinko
  • Barbara Seranella
  • Anna Sewell
  • Beth Shapiro
  • Mary Shelley
  • Carol Shields
  • Katharine Sim
  • Helen Simonson
  • Helen Simpson
  • Mary Sinclair
  • Maj Sjöwall (& Per Wahlöö)
  • Margaret Skea
  • Karin Slaughter
  • Ali Smith
  • Julie Smith
  • Shelley Smith
  • Zadie Smith
  • Susan Sontag
  • Sonia Sotomayor
  • Diana Souhami
  • Muriel Spark
  • Johanna Spyri
  • Freya Stark
  • Gertrude Stein
  • Gloria Steinem
  • Carola Stern
  • Amy Stewart
  • Mary Stewart
  • Rebecca Stott
  • Edna St. Vincent Millay
  • Kate Summerscale
  • Beverly Swerling
  • S.D. Sykes

 

T

  • Lalita Tademy
  • Amy Tan
  • Donna Tartt
  • Mary Taylor Simeti
  • F. Tennyson Jesse
  • Sheri S. Tepper
  • Mother Teresa
  • Josephine Tey
  • Grace Tiffany
  • James Tiptree Jr. (Alice Bradley Sheldon)
  • Claire Tomalin
  • Jean Toomer
  • Lillian de la Torre
  • Stella Tower
  • Sylvia Townsend Warner
  • Rose Tremain
  • Joanna Trollope
  • Gail Tsukiyama
  • Janette Turner Hospital
  • Helene Tursten
  • Joyce Tyldesley
  • Anne Tyler
     

U

  • Jenny Uglow
  • Sigrid Undset
  • Else Ury

 

V

  • Barbara Vine
  • Serena Vitale
  • Susan Vreeland

 

W

  • Alice Walker
  • Amy Wallace
  • Maureen Waller
  • Harriet Walter
  • Minette Walters
  • Evangeline Walton
  • Sarah Waters
  • Winifred Watson
  • Tiffany Watt Smith
  • Betty Webb
  • Alison Weir
  • Eudora Welty
  • Patricia Wentworth
  • Debbie Lee Wesselmann
  • Rebecca West
  • Susan Wittig Albert
  • Edith Wharton
  • Phillis Wheatley
  • Sara Wheeler
  • Ethel Lina White
  • Samantha Wilcoxson
  • Margery Williams
  • Jeanette Winterson
  • Margaret Wise Brown
  • Christa Wolf
  • Mary Wollstonecraft
  • Faith Wolseley
  • Barbara Wood
  • Paula L. Woods
  • Virginia Woolf
  • Jennifer Worth
  • Mary Wortley Montagu
  • Andrea Wulf
     

X

  • Xuē Xīnrán

 

Y

  • Tiphanie Yanique
  • Jane Yolen
  • Banana Yoshimoto
  • Marguerite Youcenar
     

Z

Julie Zeh

Xianliang Zhang

Edith M. Ziegler

Stefanie Zweig

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?