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text 2017-11-30 13:15
Surprise, Surprise Bonus Joker #2: The Cuckoo Egg

THE SOLUTION:

 

It's World Peace Day (square 10) ... which isn't on December 21, but on September 21 of each year.

 

Congrats to everybody who messaged us with the correct answer -- that's one bonus point for each of you!

 

 


 

 

 

We're almost halfway into the 16 Tasks of the Festive Season, and it's time for another bonus joker ... and for 'fessing up: because we've put one over on you. 

 

Yes, that's right, one of the 32 holidays we've included in the game isn't actually set in December but ... well, when exactly, and of course which holiday it is, will be for you to find out.

 

We'll give you two hints:

 

(1) It's not one of the holidays that we've already passed, and

 

(2) It's not one of the holidays that are based on a different calendar than the Gregorian calendar, so that they could be on certain dates in November or December in one year and on other dates the next year.

 

(Oh, and it isn't Christmas.  But you'll have suspected that.)

 

Since we'd like to give as many people as possible the chance to earn a bonus point for this one, we'd ask you to PM Murder by Death or Themis-Athena your answers so the beans don't get spilled too early.

 

The joker is good from right now until 12 midnight (EST) on November 29, 2017.

 

Happy hunting!

 

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text 2017-11-06 18:04
16 Tasks of the Festive Season - Task 10 - World Peace Day & Pancha Ganapati
The Tokyo Zodiac Murders - Ross MacKenzie,Soji Shimada,Shika MacKenzie
Y is for Yesterday (A Kinsey Millhone Novel) - Sue Grafton
In the Woods - Tana French
The Hate U Give - Angie Thomas
A Crown of Wishes - Roshani Chokshi

Doing two tasks in this combined post!

 

World Peace Day-

 

If I had wings like a dove I would love to fly to Montreal or Toronto. I really want to explore Canada more and since it's so close (I live in the D.C. area) I think I would be able to go for a week or longer and just explore. I think that either in spring 2018 or maybe summer I am going to aim to take a trip up north and go exploring. If I don't go to those cities, I did hear about cool things that I can do though that I would love. When I was in Ecuador two Canadian tourists were on the trip with our excursion and they enthused about so many things and showed me videos. 

 

Image result for canada montreal

 

Montreal

 

I know that I want to tour Niagara Falls, but I have heard about walking tours of Old Montreal and I could do a private tour of Prince Edward Island (home of the fictional Anne of Green Gables). 

 

Tasks for World Peace Day: Cook something involving olives or olive oil. Share the results and/or recipe with us. –OR–

Tell us: If you had wings (like a dove), where would you want to fly?

 

Pancha Ganapati:

 

My 5 favorite books of this year was hard to narrow down. I decided to pick the top five that I have already read more than once this year and of course that I read/reviewed for the first time this year. I just included excerpts from my full reviews so you can see why they are my favorite books for this year. 

 

The Tokyo Zodiac Murders-Wow all I have to say is that this book was great. More than anything I love clever books like this, and this was definitely very clever. I honestly was a bit worried for a couple of minutes that maybe I wouldn't be able to get the book since the setting is in Japan. But wow the author Soji Shimada is able to pretty much show you that murder is murder no matter where it takes place.

 

 

Y is for Yesterday- I have to say that I love the fact that even though this book takes place in 1989 there's definitely some similarities to what's going on in the world today in this book. There's the question of rape, there's the question of getting consent, there's the question of violence against women and what do women do in order to fight back against that. I feel like all of those are discussion topics that are very relevant in today's world. 

 

I've really hated how isolated Kinsey felt to me in the past few books was just her interacting with Henry and Rosie. But this one definitely showcases how many people are connected to Kinsey, and how many people just love her.

I was really glad to finally see it seem to laying to rest her whole relationship with the missing Robert Dietz. And I think I see a game plan coming with regards to Cheney Phillips. It was good to read what was going on with him and finally having me not wanting to kick the crap out of him based on what I thought was going on with this character.

 

 

In the Woods- What a compelling read. I finished this thing in about a day and a half. I will say that at first I found myself somewhat bored. But this book ends up being a nice slow burn of a read. I wanted even more by the time I got to the end. I already put a hold on the second book in the series. I have to say that I am really glad that French didn't try to solve the overarching mystery for the main character, Rob Ryan. I know that some readers ended up loving this character and I had to say that in the end, I didn't feel love, but just outright pity for him.

 

 

The Hate U Give-I got so many feels while reading this book.

Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, Thomas takes a look at a teenage black girl who is trying her best to be Starr back home in Garden Heights and Starr at her suburban prep school.

 

Thomas doesn't just make this a YA book, she makes this a YA book accurately showing the struggle for black Americans, for black men, black women, interracial relationships, the pain that we feel when we move away into what is considered "good areas", etc.

Thomas is able to show you so many layers to Starr and the other characters in this book that is becomes mesmerizing to read. Even with the subject matter, I loved that Thomas was able to inject humor and show how for many black Americans that tragedy does not define us, that you still keep going as much as you can, as long as you can. Heck, Thomas even shows you how much simmering anger is under the skin for many black Americans in the U.S. right now, and how those that people screech about as "thugs" and "monsters" can finally just have enough and yes start rioting.

 

 

A Crown of Wishes-  I needed a fantastic book and I savored this one for two days though I wanted to swallow it whole at times. It lingered with me in my sleep and I smiled when I woke up because I was so happy to just keep reading this book. Chokshi includes Indian myths and also just really great characters that you want to keep reading about. We also get appearances from characters from the last book that I was sad to see go when we finished. I often worry when authors start writing a YA book and write a sequel or decide it will be a trilogy. That's only because not many have held up. This one holds up. I highly recommend.

 

Tasks for Pancha Ganapati: Post about your 5 favourite books this year and why you appreciated them so much. –OR–

Take a shelfie / stack picture of the above-mentioned 5 favorite books.  (Feel free to combine these tasks into 1!

 

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text 2014-03-04 22:38
Read in February Part Two
Dominion - Bentley Little
Old Flames - Jack Ketchum
Ugly As Sin - 'James Newman', 'Shock Totem'
Six Dead Spots - Gregor Xane
Peace in Amber: The World of Kurt Vonnegut - Hugh Howey
When Crickets Cry - Charles Martin
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review 2014-02-25 05:32
PEACE IN AMBER Review
Peace in Amber: The World of Kurt Vonnegut - Hugh Howey

I'm twenty-one years old. With no home to call my own, I'm currently sleeping on my sister's couch. I've recently returned from a trip to California to see my father because he lied and said he was dying so that I would sit on a Greyhound bus for 1800 miles and come visit him. I spent the last money I had in this world to do so. I cannot afford rent, so when I return to Alabama, I'm evicted. I'm not in a chipper mood.

 

The front door flies open and my sister comes barreling into the living room. I come awake instantly at the discordant symphony that is her entrance. She shoves my legs off the couch and flops down beside me. The remote is in her hand, and she's frantically flipping channels. Doesn't matter though, because every station is playing the same disaster movie. Or is it a war movie? Some kind of alternate history thing, like RED DAWN, where some country's military has breached America's borders, has dared step a foot down on our soil with violent intent... But these aren't movie networks my sister's scrolling through. These are news outlets. CNN. FOX. MSNBC... Local stations...

 

We all know where we were the day those planes flew into the towers, and most of us do not want to be reminded of that day other than to remember the slain, and author Hugh Howey seems to get that. He doesn't dwell on the carnage, and when he must broach the topic, he does so tactfully. In this short piece, Howey channels Vonnegut to perfection. If Vonnegut weren't gone from this world, I'd have thought he wrote this. So it goes.

 

Slaughterhouse Five is one of my all time favorite works of fiction based on war. Vonnegut's novel moved me and molded me into the individual I am today: a peaceful soul that respects life. This is not to say that I am anti-war or anti-military or any other such nonsense. It's only to say that I don't like death and destruction, whether it be large-scale or intimate, and think that any loss of life is a tragedy. Funny thing for a horror writer to say, but it's the truth.

 

This is the first thing from Hugh Howey that I've read all the way through. I couldn't get into the WOOL books, or Silo Saga, or whatever they're called, and I believe my enjoyment of this novelette stemmed from my love of Vonnegut style and not Howey's. Howey does a spot on impersonation, and, for that reason alone, I tip my nonexistent hat to him.

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review 2014-02-25 00:00
Peace in Amber: The World of Kurt Vonnegut
Peace in Amber: The World of Kurt Vonnegut - Hugh Howey I'm twenty-one years old. With no home to call my own, I'm currently sleeping on my sister's couch. I've recently returned from a trip to California to see my father because he lied and said he was dying so that I would sit on a Greyhound bus for 1800 miles and come visit him. I spent the last money I had in this world to do so. I cannot afford rent, so when I return to Alabama, I'm evicted. I'm not in a chipper mood.

The front door flies open and my sister comes barreling into the living room. I come awake instantly at the discordant symphany that is her entrance. She shoves my legs off the couch and flops down beside me. The remote is in her hand, and she's frantically flipping channels. Doesn't matter though, because every station is playing the same disaster movie. Or is it a war movie? Some kind of alternate history thing, like RED DAWN, where some country's military has breached America's borders, has dared step a foot down on our soil with violent intent... But these aren't movie networks my sister's scrolling through. These are news outlets. CNN. FOX. MSNBC... Local stations...

We all know where we were the day those planes flew into the towers, and most of us do not want to be reminded of that day other than to remember the slain, and author Hugh Howey seems to get that. He doesn't dwell on the carnage, and when he must broach the topic, he does so tactfully. In this short piece, Howey channels Vonnegut to perfection. If Vonnegut weren't gone from this world, I'd have thought he wrote this. So it goes.

Slaughterhouse Five is one of my all time favorite works of fiction based on war. Vonnegut's novel moved me and molded me into the individual I am today: a peaceful soul that respects life. This is not to say that I am anti-war or anti-military or any other such nonsense. It's only to say that I don't like death and destruction, whether it be large-scale or intimate, and think that any loss of life is a tragedy. Funny thing for a horror writer to say, but it's the truth.

This is the first thing from Hugh Howey that I've read all the way through. I couldn't get into the WOOL books, or Silo Saga, or whatever they're called, and I believe my enjoyment of this novelette stemmed from my love of Vonnegut style and not Howey's. Howey does a spot on impersonation, and, for that reason alone, I tip my nonexistent hat to him.
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