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text 2018-12-10 15:19
24 Festive Tasks: Flap 16 -- Human Rights Day
Day 16 -- Human Rights Day
Task 1:  Book hunt for human rights:  Search your shelves for books with titles containing human rights words such as (but not limited to): hope, friendship, equality, justice, love, liberty, etc.  Put them in a stack and take a picture for posting.  (5 book minimum).
 
 
Task 2: Create a charter of reader’s rights, or post one of the charters floating around on the web (e.g., Daniel Pennac’s “Reader’s Bill of Rights”, or Steve Leveen’s “Top Ten Permissions of a Well-Read Life”).
 
Task 3: The symbol of Human Rights Day is the dove, which in its incarnation as a homing pigeon is also renowned for its navigational skills. – Tell us: Did you ever get so thoroughly lost (either in the days before GPS or because GPS, for whatever reason, was of no use to you) that you wished you had a homing pigeon to guide you?
 
Task 4: Human Rights Day was declared by the U.N. General Assembly, whose seat is in New York City. Treat yourself to a Manhattan (classic recipe: https://www.liquor.com/recipes/manhattan-2/ ; virgin [non-alcoholic] recipes: https://www.anallievent.com/virgin-manhattan/ , http://www.1001cocktails.com/recipes/mixed-drinks/800238/cocktail-virgin-manhattan.html and https://www.liquor.com/recipes/not-manhattan/ ) or to a bagel or pastrami sandwich and share a photo with us.
 
A lament: I would love a pastrami sandwich but I want it on the kind of rye bread that we used to be able to get when I was growing up. Before the advent of plastic bags, rye bread had a thick crust that near to broke your teeth and the heart of the loaf had a coarse texture that held together right through to the last bite -- all of this unlike the stuff they are trying to pass off as rye bread these days, which is closer to a loaf of Wonder bread. 
 
I would love a pastrami sandwich but I want it made with the kind of pastrami we got when I was growing up -- made from a brisket and not from the round or even worse, the pressed meats that are being passed off as deli meats. 
 
The nearest place for somewhat decent deli is outside of Hartford CT. But even there, the sandwiches are nothing near approaching what we once could get in any of the delis we regularly frequented in my younger days. I still dream of those loaves of rye with the paper sticker from Gold Medal Bakery baked right onto the loaf and sandwiches so big I could not even get my mouth around them. 
 
Book: Read any book with strong female characters, or written by an author from any minority group; any story about a minority overcoming their oppressors either individually or as a group. OR: A book set in New York City.
 
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text 2018-12-10 11:53
24 Festive Tasks, Door 16 - Human Rights Day
The Swan: The Seventh Day: The 12 Days of Christmas Mail Order Brides, #7 - Piper Huguley

Human Rights Day

 

Book: I chose to read The Swan: The Seventh Day (The 12 Brides of Christmas #7) by Piper Huguley. It's a romance set in Wyoming in the 1870s with a biracial heroine and the author is African-American woman. 

 

Task #1

 

From top to bottom:

Hope at Dawn by Stacey Henrie

The Audacity of Hope by Barack Obama

A Champion's Heart by Piper Huguley

An Extraordinary Union by Alyssa Cole

Our Endangered Values by Jimmy Carter

Love is Love: A Comic Book Anthology to Benefit Equality Florida by Various Authors

 

Task #2: Readers' Rights Charter

1. You have the right to read the last chapter first, especially if reading a romance. 

2. You have the right to read in any format (electronic, audio, hardcover, paperback, etc)and the right to combine those formats.

3. You have the right to read magazines, long-form journalism on the Internet, and newspapers and call it reading/call yourself a reader.

4. You have the right to read a book and not review it (unless contractually to do so). 

5. You have the right to DNF a book.

6. You have the right to read a book with either the original cover or the movie still cover.

7. You have the right to read proof-read books. 

8. Put public school librarians back into the schools. 

9. You have the right to never apologize for your reading tastes.

10. You have the right to have a virtual shelf of Authors Behaving Badly or a list of authors you would rather not buy/read/support. 

 

Task #3: 

I went camping once with a friend of my mom's and her daughter (the girl and I were like 11 years old). The daughter and I were quasi-friends, and we decided to take a walk around the lake near the campsite. I didn't know this area at all, but the other girl knew this area well, as this place was a frequent camping area that they camped at. So I followed her lead. Now I am horrible with directions and navigation, so my sanity was in this girl's hands. And she got us lost, so lost. I ended up sitting on a rock at one point and just crying my eyes out. I have a deep fear of being lost and do actually keep to the road most often traveled, the one with all the signs at even intervals pointing me in the right direction (oh the joys of traveling in the UK, where the signage is crap on the best roads and non-existent most of the time). Her mom finally came and got us, then had the gall to lecture me about getting lost and her having to come get us. I hated camping from then on and didn't socialize with either of them after that.

 

 

 

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text 2018-12-10 11:53
Door 16 Human rights day - Task 1, 2 and 3

Total points: 3 points

 

 

Tasks and Books

Human Rights Day

Task 1:  Book hunt for human rights:  Search your shelves for books with titles containing human rights words such as (but not limited to): hope, friendship, equality, justice, love, liberty, etc.  Put them in a stack and take a picture for posting.  (5 book minimum).

 

Easy. 

 

Small Acts of Resistance: How Courage, Tenacity, and Ingenuity Can Change the World - Steve Crawshaw,John Jackson,Václav Havel  Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict - Erica Chenoweth,Maria J. Stephan  Human Rights and Gender Violence: Translating International Law into Local Justice - Sally Engle Merry  A Theory of Justice - T.M. Scanlon,John Rawls  

  

You Can't Read This Book: Censorship in an Age of Freedom - Nick Cohen  The Price of Inequality: How Today's Divided Society Endangers Our Future - Joseph E. Stiglitz  The Spirit Level: Why Equality Is Better for Everyone - Kate E. Pickett,Richard G. Wilkinson  

 

Task 2: Create a charter of reader’s rights, or post one of the charters floating around on the web (e.g., Daniel Pennac’s “Reader’s Bill of Rights”, or Steve Leveen’s “Top Ten Permissions of a Well-Read Life”).

 

Reader's Bill of Rights 

 

Image result for Reader's Bill of Rights

 

Task 3: The symbol of Human Rights Day is the dove, which in its incarnation as a homing pigeon is also renowned for its navigational skills. – Tell us: Did you ever get so thoroughly lost (either in the days before GPS or because GPS, for whatever reason, was of no use to you) that you wished you had a homing pigeon to guide you?

 

All the time. I have very poor sense of direction especially when I'm thinking. Being lost is not that bad as long as your are at a safe place. 

 

I got lost one time after a conference when I walked in the wrong station and took the train in the wrong direction. Discovered it after one station and took the train back. 

 

Task 4: Human Rights Day was declared by the U.N. General Assembly, whose seat is in New York City. Treat yourself to a Manhattan (classic recipe: https://www.liquor.com/recipes/manhattan-2/ ; virgin [non-alcoholic] recipes: https://www.anallievent.com/virgin-manhattan/ , http://www.1001cocktails.com/recipes/mixed-drinks/800238/cocktail-virgin-manhattan.html and https://www.liquor.com/recipes/not-manhattan/ ) or to a bagel or pastrami sandwich and share a photo with us.

 

Later. I like this. 

 

Book: Read any book with strong female characters, or written by an author from any minority group; any story about a minority overcoming their oppressors either individually or as a group. OR: A book set in New York City.

 

OK. Let me think. Later. 

 

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text 2018-12-10 10:40
24 Festive Tasks: Door 16, Human Rights Day

 


<!--row 1-->
Human Rights Day

Guy Fawks Night
Russian Mother's Day
<!--row 2-->
veteran's and armistace day

Diwali
Penance Day
<!--row3-->
Bon om Touk

Hanukkah
dio de los meurtos
<!--row 4-->
International Day of Tolerance
St. Andrew's Day
Thanksgiving

<!--row 5-->
Sinterklaas / St. Nicholas Day

Melbourne Cup Day
<!-- row 6 -->

Advent
Mawlid

 

"Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home -- so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. [...] Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world." -- Eleanor Roosevelt

 

Human Rights Day is observed every year on 10 December – the day the United Nations General Assembly adopted, in 1948, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This year, Human Rights Day marks the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a milestone document that proclaimed the inalienable rights which everyone is inherently entitled to as a human being -- regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. It is the most translated document in the world, available in more than 500 languages.   (from http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/)

 

Tasks and Books

Human Rights Day

Task 1:  Book hunt for human rights:  Search your shelves for books with titles containing human rights words such as (but not limited to): hope, friendship, equality, justice, love, liberty, etc.  Put them in a stack and take a picture for posting.  (5 book minimum).

 

Task 2: Create a charter of reader’s rights, or post one of the charters floating around on the web (e.g., Daniel Pennac’s “Reader’s Bill of Rights”, or Steve Leveen’s “Top Ten Permissions of a Well-Read Life”).

 

Task 3: The symbol of Human Rights Day is the dove, which in its incarnation as a homing pigeon is also renowned for its navigational skills. – Tell us: Did you ever get so thoroughly lost (either in the days before GPS or because GPS, for whatever reason, was of no use to you) that you wished you had a homing pigeon to guide you?

 

Task 4: Human Rights Day was declared by the U.N. General Assembly, whose seat is in New York City. Treat yourself to a Manhattan (classic recipe: https://www.liquor.com/recipes/manhattan-2/ ; virgin [non-alcoholic] recipes: https://www.anallievent.com/virgin-manhattan/ , http://www.1001cocktails.com/recipes/mixed-drinks/800238/cocktail-virgin-manhattan.html and https://www.liquor.com/recipes/not-manhattan/ ) or to a bagel or pastrami sandwich and share a photo with us.

 

Book: Read any book with strong female characters, or written by an author from any minority group; any story about a minority overcoming their oppressors either individually or as a group. OR: A book set in New York City.

 

 

(Click "Read More" for the previous days' tasks and books.)

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review 2018-12-10 00:16
24 Festive Tasks: Door 7 - Mawlid, Book
Candy Cane Murder - Leslie Meier,Laura Levine,Joanne Fluke,Suzanne Toren

Well, let's just say that none of these three ladies is anywhere near Donna Andrews's league when it comes to cozy mysteries, plotting, character creation, dialogue, and a writer's craft in general.  And if I thought Joanna Fluke's entry was disappointing (mediocre plotting and dialogue, character responses that felt forced / didn't make sense, and one of my no-go TSTL behavior tropes as the "big reveal" cue (though I have to hand it to Fluke, the setting and overall scene of the final confrontation with the murderer was inspired)), I'm sorry to have to say that Leslie Meier's contribution did even less for me -- you could scratch off the Hallmark sugar coating with a shovel, virtually NONE of the characters' actions and responses bore even the slightest semblance of realism,  and she managed to make 1980s rural Maine come across as more backward than it probably was even in the 1940s and 1950s (while also looking more dripping-with-saccharine-style-homely than any Norman Rockwell picture -- and for the record, I like Norman Rockwell.  Or at least I like his Christmas pictures.)

 

Laura Levine's entry fared a bit better (I'd call it the book's highlight if such a term were appropriate for a muted glow in the midst of two seriously dulled lights); at least she took me right back to L.A. inside my head and the plotting was halfway decent.  But her story seriously suffered from an overabundance of quirky characters, not-very-subtle hints at the MC's padded waistline and her resolutions to do something about it (in which she predictably fails on every single occasion -- and yes, I know this actually is an L.A. thing; been there and would have bought the T-shirt, too, if I'd found it funny then, but the last thing I want is to have this sort of fad jammed up my nose with a sledgehammer in a book) -- and an equal overabundance of wannabe hipster slang and coloquialisms ... everything from repeated exclamations like "ugh!", "oh golly!" and "drat!" to "bet my bottom cupcake" (and yes, even there she goes again with the calorie stuff).  Oh, and the MC's conversations with her cat and said cat's female-Garfield act got old pretty soon as well.

 

Oh well.  If nothing else, this has made me appreciate the consistently high quality of Donna Andrews's writing even more -- I'll happily be returning to her for my cozy contemporary Christmas mysteries (I just hope she'll reliably continue to produce them for the foreseeable future).

 

I may try some of the recipes included in this book eventually, though.

 

Since the audiobook I listened to has a green cover, I'll be using this as my book for the Mawlid square.

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