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review 2017-10-22 01:54
Hot Steamy Glasses (manga) by Tatsumi Kaiya, translated by Sachiko Sato
Hot Steamy Glasses (Yaoi) - Tatsumi Kaiya

Hot Steamy Glasses features two stories, although the second one is extremely short, more of an extra than anything. Most of the volume is devoted to the story of Takeo and Fumi. Takeo is the president of a successful I.T. company. He’s been in love with his friend Fumi for the past 17 years. He lives in hope that, despite being heterosexual, Fumi will one day agree to live with him and go on a date with him. Fumi’s younger brother, Shogo, is doubtful of this but does want something to change: either for Fumi to finally give Takeo a chance or for Takeo to move on and fall in love with someone who isn’t quite so mean to him.

Takeo’s an otaku, specifically one who’s into moe characters (romanized here as “moeh”), and Fumi isn’t shy about expressing his annoyance and disgust. Still, Takeo persists and does what he can to appeal to Fumi and make him happy.

I picked this one up after reading a review that described it as sweet and said that it contained surprisingly little sex. I hoped that this meant it’d be non-rapey.

Although Hot Steamy Glasses had quite a few amusing conversations and lines, it didn’t turn out to be the sweet and fun romance I’d hoped for. The first chapter was written from the perspective of Shogo, Fumi’s younger brother, and I was immediately convinced that the real romance would be between Takeo and Shogo. Shogo would finally convince Takeo to stop chasing after his brother, who’d repeatedly told Takeo that he wasn’t interested and who, to top it off, was also a bit of a jerk. Shogo would give Takeo a shoulder to cry on, and gradually the two of them would fall in love. That story would have been so much better than what actually happened.

The first half of the volume was okay, even after I realized, to my dismay, that Fumi really was the person the author planned to pair Takeo off with. The chapter where Fumi got sick had some nice funny moments, and I particularly liked Reiko, the secretary Takeo sent to take care of Fumi after he had to go back to work.

The volume took a sudden turn for the worse when Fumi finally agreed to be Takeo’s boyfriend. For one thing, Fumi’s change of heart came practically out of nowhere. He’d spent 17 years telling Takeo “no,” and here he was, changing his mind because of a few comments from Shogo and because Takeo reeeally loved him. Never mind that he’d repeatedly said he wasn’t gay and that Takeo had shown some tendencies towards controlling behavior, asking Fumi to quit his job and move in with him so that he could take care of him. Fumi’s response to Takeo telling him to quit his job was one of the few times I cheered for Fumi.

For another, there was the issue of sex. It strained my suspension of disbelief that Fumi had more of a problem with the lack of sex in their relationship than with the idea of having sex with a man for the first time. Again, he’d spent his entire life up to this point believing himself to be heterosexual, and there were no prior signs that he was interested in Takeo or other men. Even so, the only thing that bugged him was that his and Takeo’s relationship wasn’t much different after they officially became boyfriends than it was before. They didn’t really go out on dates, they didn’t kiss, and they didn’t have sex.

And boy did the lack of sex bother him. That’s when the volume got slightly rapey. Fumi decided that the two of them were finally going to have sex, and that was that: “Even if he resists, I’m gonna force him!” Thankfully, Fumi was gone when he got home, or it might have gone from slightly rapey to “this includes rape.”

Or maybe not. Their first sex scene was very sudden, and also initiated by Takeo. There was none of the awkwardness I would have expected, considering. Just BOOM, sex. Even Fumi found himself wondering why Takeo was so skillful and confident considering that he was probably a virgin.

Okay, let’s go back to the “Fumi really wants sex and isn’t getting any” stuff for a bit, so I can talk about something else that bugged me. I’m sure it was completely unintentional on the author’s part, but this part of the volume became a bit acephobic. As Fumi tried to feel his way around how to handle this part of their relationship, his frustrated thoughts included statements like “What is he, still a middle school student…?” and “I’m almost thirty years old! ‘Going together’ = ‘sex’ - I’m sure I’m not mistaken on that point.”

The implication was pretty clear: if Takeo really hadn’t been interested in having sex, Fumi couldn’t have handled it. And then the volume might have included rape instead of, say, the two of them talking through their differing needs and maybe breaking up if they couldn’t figure out a resolution that would work for both of them. The last time I had to deal with crap like this was in a book actually featuring an asexual character. This wasn’t quite as bad as that, but I still really could have done without it.

The volume’s ending was the one thing I’d agree was sweet. It took place several years after the events of the bulk of the story, showing how things were working out for Takeo, Fumi, Shogo, and Reiko. That said, it couldn’t make up for Takeo and Fumi’s shoddily constructed “romance.”

The volume ends with a short unrelated manga, “Young Love Graffiti.” Naomi fell in love with his tutor, Aki, when he was in junior high, but he didn’t realize it at the time and they both went their separate ways. He was excited to reconnect with Aki when they were both invited to the same wedding reception, but their relationship since then hasn’t been nearly as wonderful as Naomi could have wished. Naomi worries that he’s more in love with Aki than Aki is with him.

This story was so forgettable that I had to reread it before writing this review. It accomplished little more than adding to the volume’s page count, and I’ll probably forget it again in a few hours.

All in all, Hot Steamy Glasses wasn’t what I’d hoped it would be, and the artwork didn’t do much to make up for the story’s deficiencies - many of the male characters looked alike, and characters’ expressions could have been better.

Extras:

The volume includes a 2-page manga-style afterword by the author. The afterword was a little funny. Kaiya’s editor noticed that both of the stories contained characters with the same family name, and both of those characters looked kind of similar, so Kaiya came up with a quickie explanation that relied on both of the stories being set in the same world.

 

Rating Note:

 

I struggled with rating this. Parts of my review make this sound like a 1-star read, but I didn't hate it enough for that. I finally settled on 2 stars. Either way, it's going on my "offload to free up shelf space" pile.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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text 2017-10-15 19:26
Reading progress update: I've read 200 out of 200 pages.
Hot Steamy Glasses (Yaoi) - Tatsumi Kaiya

Well, that was disappointing. It gets points for having a few entertaining characters, and I liked that the best characters in the volume, Shogo (Fumi's brother) and Reiko (the secretary), ended up together, even though their relationship made no sense. Then again, very little in this made sense.

 

I don't think "not rape-y" is too much to ask, and yet even this volume couldn't quite manage it.

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text 2017-10-15 16:12
Reading progress update: I've read 50 out of 200 pages.
Hot Steamy Glasses (Yaoi) - Tatsumi Kaiya

Oh geez, I think Takeo and Fumi really are going to end up together. I was hoping Takeo would end up with Fumi's younger brother, who's nice and thinks Takeo is fine the way he is (aside from his inadvisable crush on Fumi).

 

Anyway, best convo yet, even though I'm a bit irked at the situation that led to it. Read the panel from right to left. For context, Fumi has the flu and Takeo was taking care of him. Takeo had to go to work, so he sent a secretary from his company to take care of Fumi (because Takeo's the CEO and the secretary has nothing better to do with her time *snort*). The first bubble is the secretary and the next one is Fumi. One thousand points to the secretary for not letting Fumi step on her and for establishing clear boundaries.

 

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text 2017-10-15 15:42
Reading progress update: I've read 20 out of 200 pages.
Hot Steamy Glasses (Yaoi) - Tatsumi Kaiya

I'm guessing on the page number.

 

I picked this up a while back because some reviewer said it was sweet, which I hoped meant that it was also non-rapey. The artwork isn't really to my taste, but so far it has some good lines.

 

 

 

I'm pretty sure the guy Takeo ends up with is not the guy he's initially in love with, because otherwise I don't see how the word "sweet" could ever be applied to this. Fumi sucks, and Takeo shouldn't have to remake himself from the ground up to win his affection and approval.

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2017-06-12 22:50
浴びる純情 [Abiru Junjou] - Yuzuha Ougi
Questo manga mi ha molto deluso. Ammetto che le aspettative non erano proprio altissime, la trama infatti è trita e ritrita, vista in milioni di Shonen e Shojo, il classico studentello che si innamora (ricambiato) del professore, semplice e chiaro, eppure la scelta di associare a un professore uno studente minorenne... mi aveva fatto sperare in qualcosa di più profondo e che potesse toccare temi importanti e delicati e invece...così non è stato o meglio... lo è stato solo in parte. Il problema principale di questo manga è che tira in ballo troppe cose, nel corso di circa 200 paginette (anche meno) vengono presentati un sacco di argomenti, uno più spinoso dell'altro per poi essere dimenticati o affrontati in modo superficiale. Primo fra tutti il rapporto tra un ventitreenne e un quindicenne... mi aspettavo che "l'amore" tra i due sarebbe scattato a poco a poco, magari grazie a momenti particolari, situazioni delicate invece... lo studente abbandonato a se stesso si incolla come una cozza al professore e bump, love story con il ragazzo cotto a puntino e il professore cotto anche lui dopo poche pagine. Momenti di riflessione? Di psicologia non, forse, da parte del quindicenne in preda agli ormoni ma almeno dal professore? Ovviamente no anche se era il MINIMO! Un minimo di introspezione del tipo "è sbagliato portarmi a letto un mio studente?!" lo pretendevo. Invece nulla e tutta la storiella nasce banalmente, senza riflessioni di sorta. Questo punto già dovrebbe bastare a far capire tutto il potenziale sprecato e invece... non basta. Vengono citati argomenti importantissimi lanciati e dimenticati ad esempio, si parla di tentato stupro, il giovane è stato vittima di un tentativo di violenza da parte di... un professore! WOW... questa cosa dovrebbe portare a uno sconvolgimento emotivo?! Una riflessione profonda su come un giovane quasi abusato possa stare male ad avere rapporti intimi con un altro professore? Il giovane si ritrova sconvolto da un tentativo di approccio sessuale? Ma ovviamente no! Tutto dimenticato!
Si parla di suicidio o meglio tentato suicidio del professore maniaco...se ne parla? NO! Si accenna e basta
Il protagonista è stato abbandonato dalla madre, c'è un confronto straziante tra madre e figlio che porta magari a una riconciliazione o anche solo un momento intimo tra la coppia? NO! Viene tirata in ballo la madre che dice "Eh.... ero egoista" e stop...vuole vedere o parlare con il figlio? Ma anche no, chissene di sto povero Cristo, tanto è già sfigato di suo...
Viene tirato in ballo prepotentemente il bullismo, Yuka è infatti vittima di bullismo feroce da parte delle compagne di classe, questo  porta conseguenze? Ci sono momenti drammatici/introspettivi? Il ragazzo soffre per questo bullismo tanto da avere problemi di salute o "mentali"? NO, come se nulla fosse, la vive bene e neanche ne parla con il fidanzato, ci sono due o tre atti, tra cui uno in cui una dolce fanciulla intaglia la parola Muori sul banco del ragazzo ma tutto finisce lì... i professori se ne accorgono? Ovviamente si visto che dicono che è vittima di bullismo da tempo e bla bla bla
Fanno qualcosa? Ma nooo... è solo uno studente! Perchè punirne mille per salvarne uno? Non serve... no? 
Avviene un rapporto sessuale tra i due... c'è una prima volta coinvolgente emotivamente e fisicamente tra i due con eventuale riflessioni del tipo "Ho appena fatto sesso con un minorenne e finirò in carcere"? NO, è tutto... semplice... "Ti ho mentito... facciamolo".... ok....
Il protagonista è abbandonato a se stesso quando la nonna viene portata in ospedale, a parte il fidanzato/professore qualcuno se ne accorge o frega? Degli assistenti sociali o simili si preoccupano di aiutare un MINORENNE a cavarsela da solo? Ovviamente no!
C'è un giovane interessato al protagonista, si crea anche solo un piccolo triangolo che porta a riflessioni profonde o anche solo riflessioni del tipo "Quel ragazzo minorenne sarebbe un compagno migliore rispetto a me, professore ventitreenne?"? NO
Muore la nonna, qualcuno se ne frega? NO! 
Insomma... per capirci questo libro è un grande NO... a leggerlo sembra di vivere su Marte,i protagonisti sono piatti, per nulla caratterizzati e la società in cui vivono è... grottesca perchè in quale MONDO un quindicenne viene lasciato solo a scazzo con il professore maniaco? In nessuno credo (e spero) 
Vengono tirati in ballo argomenti importanti che vengono banalizzati o lasciati al caso ed è proprio questo che mi ha fatto infuriare come una iena. Ci sono stati in passato manga o romanzi che trattavano relazioni tra adulti e minorenni ma almeno cercavano di essere delicati e dove non era possibile non citavano a caso mille possibili drammi, se si voleva e non si sapeva fare si poteva evitare, se non si voleva magari dividere la storia in due volumi così da approfondire il tutto come si deve invece di citare suicidio, bullismo, stupro e company.. ci si poteva tenere sul romance, senza impegni così da creare un storia puramente fluff & smutt così da andare sul sicuro... così invece...ci si sotterra con le proprie mani. Sono rimasta quindi molto delusa ed è un vero peccato perchè lo stile dell'autrice mi piace molto e rovinare tutto con una "non storia" è un peccato
Francamente non mi sento di consigliarlo, ci sono storie più interessanti, delicate e coinvolgenti
 
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