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Search tags: 2.5-stars
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review 2019-02-19 14:35
Dancing Men (Hunt&Cam4Ever #3)
Dancing Men - Adira August

Hunter decided heaven was being eternally in the moment of waking naturally next to someone you wanted to see when you opened your eyes.

 

Phew.

 

Love it when the relationship and the mystery are done in a way they work together. Nothing drives me more crazy than a mystery that almost acts as a page filler. I find myself either bored with the mystery or bored with the couple. Here they worked unbelievably well as a cohesive story. Absolutely loving the development of these characters and how different they are from every other couple I have ever read about.

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review 2019-02-18 20:38
Sea Of Stars
Sea of Stars (The Kricket Series Book 2) - Amy A. Bartol

It's been a while since I read the first book in the series, so some of the details were a bit blurry when I started Sea of Stars. Kricket, the main character with the most *uhm* special name and also her very special character of course, has found her way up in the stars between two (or possibly more) warring alien species/gangs. (I say alien because that is what they say in the book, and they make tiny, stupid human jokes. However, the physical appearance of said aliens is like humans, but ultimately better, obviously).

Where in the first book I was mainly annoyed by A) annoying Kricket and B) the human-like, human-feeling aliens, this time around there was little time for any of that as the story is immediately in full swing. Jumping around from one fight to the next while all that she wants to do is bunk down with her (new?) (insta?) love interest (I seriously can't remember him from the first book, if he was in there). Near the end, the typical end of the second book in a series great revelation is revealed, which will carry the story to the concluding book, which I will probably read sometime soon.

Now, this was actually kind of a nice read, all things considered. It was an easy read, and the things that bothered my in the first book, didn't bother me so much any more. While I had the feeling not a lot happened in the book, it was exciting enough for me to keep reading. It was an easy and quick read and sometimes these are just what you need.

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

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review 2019-02-18 08:28
Under The Stars (Iron Orchids Book 6) by Danielle Norman
Under The Stars (Iron Orchids #6) - Danielle Norman

 

 

The Christakos family hold a special place in my heart. So when I found out George and Christine were getting their own story I couldn't wait. Under the Stars is the beginning of what love is. George is as rambunctious as his offspring. He acts first and is forced to think it through later. Must be a family thing, but even at his most rebellious, he shows glimpses of the patriach we all know and love. Christine is not without a hint of that fire that shines through her children. She speaks her mind, knows her heart and in George she finds her soul. Norman has created a family that knows how to be a family. What a great legacy. One click all the way.

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review 2019-02-14 19:39
Carmela by Amalia Decker Marquez
Carmela (Spanish Edition) - Amalia Decker Marquez

I wasn’t sure about this book, which is long, little-known, and apparently only available in the original Spanish. But it presents an interesting story, if a meandering one; it’s semi-autobiographical, and more fictionalized biography than tightly-plotted novel. Carmela Macker is born into a well-off socialist family in Cochabamba in the the mid 20th century, becomes a guerrillera as a teenager, experiences love and tragedy, has several lovers and two daughters, becomes a journalist, runs for political office, and goes into and out of exile in a variety of Latin American countries as Bolivia goes through periods of dictatorship and democracy. The book’s timeline starts out scattered – going right from Carmela’s birth to the abrupt departure of her partner of many years in middle age – but around 50 pages in, it settles into a chronological structure that persists for the rest of the book.

It’s an interesting story, consisting primarily of short chapters, and with a lot of ground to cover the plot doesn’t ever linger for long in one place. It’s primarily told from Carmela’s third-person perspective, though on a couple of occasions it tells the stories of other guerrilleras whose connection to Carmela is tenuous, but whose capture by the military government exposes them to horrors that Carmela herself never experiences. There’s not a lot of physical action – situations that would have been milked for additional drama in a purely imaginative drama resolve themselves more quietly here – but there’s always a lot going on in Carmela’s life and the political realm in which she operates. I learned a fair bit about Bolivian history, though the author is perhaps not an entirely objective source; while Carmela ultimately leaves partisan politics, there were a few passages that made me wonder, such as the view of food rationing as a necessary sacrifice for the greater good during her time in exile in Cuba.

Even so, I was glad to read this book; Bolivia is a fascinating country about which not much has been written, and although this presents only one economically privileged perspective, it was still great to get an insider’s view of the country. I didn’t always like Carmela or agree with her choices – in particular, her embarking on an affair with a married playboy when she has a partner and young daughter at home, all presented as if she were powerless to stop herself from giving in and falling in love – but I found it to be a lively, readable story, full of political and personal reversals and characters who, one way or another, are always able to adapt. It’s too bad this hasn’t been translated to English, but for those who are able to find and read it I think it is worth the effort.

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review 2019-02-12 19:43
Review: "Blaze" (Unbreakable Bonds, #5) by Jocelynn Drake & Rinda Elliott
Blaze - Rinda Elliott,Jocelynn Drake

For the first time in this series I had some minor issues regarding the story.

 

For example, I HATE it when a character doesn’t want any children and explicitly says so, and yet his partner tries to convince him otherwise. Some people/couples just really, truly don’t want any children and like it that way, authors.

 

 

I also wasn’t very enthusiastic about that storyline with Lucas’ sister Nicole. I found his strong reaction towards her a little weird and also out of character. I didn’t get why he still held such a huge grudge against her after all these years for something she said to him when she was 14 (!) years old and basically still a child.

 

But this is just small stuff. Because when this series shines, it shines. And it never shines brighter than when (any) two characters have a heart to heart (Lucas and Snow!). Those are the moments that make this series.

 

Oh, and that wedding of course. That was everything one could wish for.

 

 

~ 4 stars ~

 

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